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    1. Rebecca
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    2. To Kill a Mockingbird
    $34.95 list($14.95)
    3. Sliver
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    4. Laura
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    5. Hush ... Hush, Sweet Charlotte
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    6. The Godfather, Part II
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    7. Lifeboat
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    8. To Kill a Mockingbird
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    9. The Birds
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    10. Night of the Twisters
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    11. Madame X
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    12. Witness
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    13. The Sting
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    14. What Ever Happened to Baby Jane?
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    15. Fried Green Tomatoes
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    16. Duel
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    17. Play Time
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    18. A Time to Kill
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    19. Separate But Equal
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    20. The Crucible

    1. Rebecca
    Director: Alfred Hitchcock
    list price: $14.98
    our price: $14.98
    (price subject to change: see help)
    Asin: 6301670140
    Catlog: Video
    Sales Rank: 774
    Average Customer Review: 4.65 out of 5 stars
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    Amazon.com essential video

    Rebecca is an ageless, timeless adult movie about a woman who marries a widower but fears she lives in the shadow of her predecessor. This was Hitchcock's first American feature, and it garnered the Best Picture statue at the 1941 Academy Awards. In today's films, most twists and surprises are ridiculous or just gratuitous, so it's sobering to look back on this film where every revelation not only shocks, but makes organic sense with the story line. Laurence Olivier is dashing and weak, fierce and cowed. Joan Fontaine is strong yet submissive, defiant yet accommodating. There isn't a false moment or misstep, but the film must have killed the employment outlook of any women named Danvers for about 20 years. Brilliant stuff. --Keith Simanton ... Read more

    Reviews (115)

    5-0 out of 5 stars Gothic Greatness
    From the opening shots and line about dreaming of a visit to Manderly again, to the final shots of Mrs. Danvers and the flames, Alfred Hitchcock creates a dark, eerie atmosphere that will remain with the viewer every time you see the film. Although Rebecca is never seen, her presence is felt throughout the entire movie. Laurence Olivier, as the late Rebecca's tortured husband is good, although I think his moods and personal torture are played too strongly. Joan Fontaine, never an actress I have especially admired, is surprisingly excellent as Olivier's new, unnamed, naive wife, thrust into a world she is unprepared to deal with. But the greatest performance of the film belongs to Judith Anderson as Mrs. Danvers, Rebecca's housekeeper, and consequently, Fontaine's nemesis. With her daunting profile and posture, and her chilling delivery of lines, she creates one of the most memorable film characters I have ever seen. With its winding plot, terrific performances, and the direction of Alfred Hitchcock creating tension and atmosphere on a Gothic scale, Rebecca is one of the greater suspense films I have ever seen.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Classic Suspense
    The Best Picture in 1940 and an adaptation of Daphne du Maurier's famous novel. It is not at all surprising this movie won two Academy Awards and nine other nominations. Through the masterful direction of Alfred Hitchcock, you will be kept in complete suspense. The newly restored version from the original negatives is presented full-frame and has been digitally mastered for optimum picture and sound. The result is a sumptuous black-and-white film that is better than I have ever seen it before. They do say this movie gets better each time you watch it, and I must agree.

    The opening scenes convince you that this is going to be quite a forbidding story. A meandering path overgrown with foliage and a ghostly manor (Manderley) appears out of the Cornwall, England mist. The gothic quality is only the stage for a love story haunted by the memory of Rebecca. While this is mostly filled with suspense and mystery, there are a few moments of humor.

    While a young woman (Joan Fontaine) is vacationing in the South of France as a ladies companion, she meets a wealthy widower Maxim de Winter (Lawrence Olivier). His wife, Rebecca is said to have died in a boating accident. They fall in love, marry and then he takes her home to Manderley. She is ill prepared for such a position in society and stumbles through her days trying to adapt as best she can.

    "Rebecca" is the theme of this movie, yet the heroine is the second rather timid Mrs. de Winter when she rises to the occasion and takes on this ghost who haunts her husband. Mrs. Danvers (Judith Anderson) manages the manor and seeks to keep the first Mrs. de Winter's memory alive in an almost obsessive way. She is cold and has no regard for Maxim's new wife's feelings. Judith Anderson is just magnificent in her role and her character is in a way is Rebecca's ghost personified.

    The conclusion is surprising as we find out how Maxim really feels and the story unfolds one detail at a time to finish with a satisfying conclusion. You will never once think these characters are actors, they are their characters from start to finish.

    You must watch this movie in complete darkness with just a few candles burning for it to be just slightly scary. One of my all-time favorite movies. Definitely worth owning!

    5-0 out of 5 stars Yummy Classic Movie
    I have seen all of Hitchcock's American work. If you are familiar with his movies, you probably agree that, with the exception of "Family Plot", his films are delicious brain food! Rebecca is a beautiful, mysterious and tragic piece. Olivier and Fontaine are at the peak of their talent and beauty. By the way, if you like Joan Fontaine in this film, her performance is equally good in Hitchcock's Suspicion, with Cary Grant. Why aren't most modern actors this good, hmmm? Hey Mr. Soderbergh, please don't remake this one! There's a reason why we call them 'Classic'.

    5-0 out of 5 stars A classic shines.
    A stunning transfer from Criterion. "Rebecca" remains one of the finest films of the 1940's, and features Joan Fontaine as the second mistress of Manderley, forever living in the shadow of her mysterious predecessor. Lawrence Olivier is perhaps detached in his performance, but nevertheless embodies the master of Manderley as few others of his generation could. "Rebecca" also contains the paranoia, suspense, and dreamlike mood that would color much of director Alfred Hitchcock's later work. Criterion continues to put the major DVD distributors to shame with its transfers of old films, and once again proves that although higher in price, their DVD's are worth every penny.

    5-0 out of 5 stars "We can never go back to Manderley again"
    Joan Fontaine laments as she opens the film, obviously several years removed from her time at the lush, oversized estate, which recalls "Tara" from Gone With the Wind as a residence which is actually also a character in the movie. People remember the houses from these two films almost more than the characters. No coincidence that both films were produced by the ridiculously meticulous David O. Selznick. GWtW was of course the most popular film of all time, so Selznick figured he had the right idea about how to make a film. Details, right down to the last corner.

    Alfred Hitchcock had made a career in London making films with complete autonomy. He basically called all the shots. When he got to America, he signed a four movie deal with Selznick. Rebecca is the first and best of the three. (no, not a mistake, I'll explain later) Rebecca was the only film by Hitchcock to win best picture from the Academy, although Hitch did not win best director. The film was basically a tug of war between producer and director. Selznick wanted the book followed religiously, Hitch wanted to take the basic idea of the book and add his own touches. Selznick wouldn't allow it, so Hitch was forced to make the film exactly by the book.

    The film stars Fontaine as an unnamed young woman who while working as a paid companion for the unbearable Mrs. Van Hopper (Florence Bates), she meets and falls in love with the brooding Maxim de Winter (Lawrence Olivier). They marry after a quick courtship and go "home" to Manderley, Olivier's mammoth estate. Fontaine is very young and has no idea what she is getting into, especially when it dawns on her that Olivier's late first wife, Rebecca, still dominates the house. Her stationery, napkins, and rituals are still present, and Fontaine feels she has no chance against this woman.

    The other problem in the house is the housekeeper, Mrs. Danvers (Judith Anderson),who creeps around the house, showing up at any time to frighten Fontaine. She is still obsessed with Rebecca, still keeps Rebecca's old room the same way, hairbrush at the correct angle on the vanity. She makes Fontaine feel she will never measure up, will never be a great lady of Manderley, something that Mrs. Van Hopper tried to tell her as well. Everyone and everything in the house revolves around this dead Rebecca, so much so that Fontaine almost can't live through it.

    Rebecca never appears in the film, yet it is amazing how much of a character she is. When Fontaine tries to dress up for a ball, Danvers suggests a portrait on the wall which is supposed to be a long dead relative of Maxims. Of course, when Fontaine wears the dress, she realizes from Maxim's reaction that the woman and the dress were Rebecca and that she just reminded him of her.

    Eventually the film goes into Rebecca's death in some detail. We never know for sure that we know all the details of the death, but it doesn't really matter. By the end of the movie, all the major characters in the film will have been changed. Some will have been destroyed forever.

    Criterion has done a great job with this film, giving us a great transfer, as always, along with a superb commentary. The second disc features trailers, interviews with Fontaine and Anderson, making of featurettes, examples of Selznick's letters and his attention to detail, and how maddening it got for the master.

    By the way, Selznick got three films out of Hitchcock. They were Rebecca, Spellbound, and The Paradine Case. Well, he really got four, but he gave one of them to RKO studios because he was unhappy with the story and he thought it would interest no one. What was the film Selznick gave away? It was Hitch's best film of all time in my opinion--Notorious. What a waste it would have been had Selznick been allowed to ruin Hitch's masterpiece. ... Read more


    2. To Kill a Mockingbird
    Director: Robert Mulligan
    list price: $9.98
    (price subject to change: see help)
    Asin: 0783222955
    Catlog: Video
    Sales Rank: 4843
    Average Customer Review: 4.69 out of 5 stars
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    Amazon.com essential video

    Ranked 34 on the American Film Institute's list of the 100 Greatest American Films, To Kill a Mockingbird is quite simply one of the finest family-oriented dramas ever made. A beautiful and deeply affecting adaptation of the Pulitzer Prize-winning novel by Harper Lee, the film retains a timeless quality that transcends its historically dated subject matter (racism in the Depression-era South) and remains powerfully resonant in present-day America with its advocacy of tolerance, justice, integrity, and loving, responsible parenthood. It's tempting to call this an important "message" movie that should be required viewing for children and adults alike, but this riveting courtroom drama is anything but stodgy or pedantic. As Atticus Finch, the small-town Alabama lawyer and widower father of two, Gregory Peck gives one of his finest performances with his impassioned defense of a black man (Brock Peters) wrongfully accused of the rape and assault of a young white woman. While his children, Scout (Mary Badham) and Jem (Philip Alford), learn the realities of racial prejudice and irrational hatred, they also learn to overcome their fear of the unknown as personified by their mysterious, mostly unseen neighbor Boo Radley (Robert Duvall, in his brilliant, almost completely nonverbal screen debut). What emerges from this evocative, exquisitely filmed drama is a pure distillation of the themes of Harper Lee's enduring novel, a showcase for some of the finest American acting ever assembled in one film, and a rare quality of humanitarian artistry (including Horton Foote's splendid screenplay and Elmer Bernstein's outstanding score) that seems all but lost in the chaotic morass of modern cinema. --Jeff Shannon ... Read more

    Reviews (220)

    5-0 out of 5 stars EVERYONE SHOULD SEE THIS MOVIE
    Truman Capote's influence is felt everywhere in both the book and film versions of TO KILL A MOCKINGBIRD, Harper Lee's classic, beautifully haunting story of childhood, innocence lost, and of the cruelty that exists in people everywhere. Yes, Gregory Peck is Atticus Finch, and all of the players here inhabit their roles with grace, humor and gravity, but it is Mary Badham as Scout who steals the show, as it should be. The simplicity of a father's touch, of a rapist's grimace, of the wind gently blowing through the trees at dusk -- everything in this movie evokes, from Scout's point of view, a time we each have in our lives that transforms us into adults. There comes with it an aching sadness -- as if saying goodbye to a comforting old friend -- but the revelation carries with it a profound joy. Elmer Bernstein's score realizes each emotional chord of the film, and transports us without ever lambasting us -- it is the best kind of movie score. You will be hooked from the opening credits, which are creatively brilliant -- those crayons, the haunting and beguiling theme softly begins on the piano -- through to the closing credits, at which point there will be well-earned tears softly falling down your cheek.

    5-0 out of 5 stars The Summer We Discovered Life
    Every so often, as surely as night follows day, a film comes along that manages to transport us from our everyday lives and into a time and place that is recalled through memories of better and in a reversal of fortunes, turbulent times. To Kill A Mockingbird is such a film.

    In a Pulitzer Prize winning novel by Harper Lee, the small town of Macomb, Alabama is portrayed in the summer of 1932, during the deepest depression that the United States had ever experienced. Over the course of the next year and a half, events will burrow inside this sleepy southern town and the lives of its residents will be transported by actions, ideas, perceptions and convictions that will influence one and all in ways that will ring true for years to come.

    Atticus Finch (Gregory Peck) is a lawyer and widower, raising two small children, Scout (Mary Badham) and her older brother Jem (Phillip Alford). Into their lives enters a visitor, Dill (John Megna) from Meridian, Mississippi, come to spend two weeks with his Aunt Stephanie (Alice Ghostley). Macomb is a town with nothing to do and if there were, no money to spend on it. The stage is being set for a life shattering episode that will not go quietly into that good night.

    Childhood holds its fascinations, its myths, its coming of age and through the eyes of the three children, the audience is allowed to peer into the adult world around them as perceived through the minds and souls of innocence that will be all too easily shattered as time whistles down the track. One of the stories woven so masterfully within its covers is the local urban legend of bogeyman, Boo Radley (Robert Duval), who lives on the same block as the Finch family. In a narration, rather like playing telephone, his persona takes on all the familiar attributes of a raving lunatic, a monster out for blood. His aura becomes the end all for Scout, Jem and Dill as they seek to master the mystery surrounding Boo and the ability to live to tell the tale!

    Into this world of innocence, a shattering crescendo of complexity wraps itself in the lives of the townspeople in the form of an alleged rape of a white woman, Mayella Violet Ewell (Collin Wilcox) by a black man, Tom Robinson (Brock Peters). Atticus Finch is called upon to act as counsel for Robinson and in doing so, the stage has been set for a dance with race relations and the exemplary lengths that are gone to in order to allow justice to prevail in the face of malcontent.

    The performances throughout To Kill A Mockingbird are stunning. Gregory Peck, as the gentleman lawyer, mired in small town attitudes and thoughts that were so representational in the southern gothic sphere, has collected and held a restrained order to his character, and in the process, he has allowed us all to be on the receiving end of hate as conveyed through the actions of small minds and small people. The children, especially Mary Badham, are siblings of more than a movie making venture. They show the absence of preconceived notions, and the guile of beings before the actions of adults can render their world as lost and gone with the shedding of time.

    James Anderson as Tom Ewell is the complete representation of oily slime as Mayella's father. He embodies all of the hate and prejudice that continues to be harboured to this day in the souls of those who would attempt to wield their vision of the way things should and ought to be. He has a foul baseness that lingers like a bad rash as he attempts to invoke his arguments through drunken bullying and hatred. Collin Willcox as Mayella is excruciatingly convincing as the bored, housebound white woman who tries to tempt Tom Robinson into kissing her and through her actions sets in motion a rollercoaster of tragedy to come. Her speech to the assembled courtroom is superb and as the audience, you feel her anger and resentment at having to be put in such a position, having to lie to save face and what little position she has in the town. Brock Peters as the aforementioned Robinson is equally sure in the allotted time he spends on the screen. There is a noble demeanor to his bearing, and yet we are aware of the restrictions that blacks were held to in their relationships with whites at the time.

    Robert Mulligan, the director and Horton Foote, the screenwriter, have presented us with a look into our pasts and faithfully etched a portrait of quiet and artfully rendered proportions that draw us into the canvas and the lives of those assembled. We have walked a mile in their shoes and been under their skin. Foote worried about being able to do justice to Lee's novel, but he worried for nothing. He has completely evoked an era that now rests behind clouds of dust, blown by the winds of time into oblivion.

    The cinematography by Russell Harlan and the set decoration by Oliver Emert carry us back through the courtesy of black and white to a depiction seen only in old photographs and clouding memories of those who lived in those precarious times. Black and white films seem to have had a curse thrust upon them by the younger generation today, as boring and tedious, but through the courtesies extended by Harlan and Emert, we are richer for those perceptions that would harken back throughout the pages of history.

    Elmer Bernstein's film score carries us like an old friend and helps us to make our acquaintances with the characters held within this framework. He has achieved much with a simple theme and persuades us that said simplicity is fulfilled with less rather than more.

    To Kill A Mockingbird is beautifully haunting and having been made in the 60's, at the height of the Civil Rights movement, it garners our attention to stop and take the time to truly 'see' what the human race is all about and what it can and should be, if taken over the bumps in the road and onto a path of sincere honesty and purpose. No special effects were needed, no huge Hollywood budget, no splashing of a story that had a happy ending for everyone involved. It is an open book into the realities of a world tilting temporarily off its axis, and being brought back on track through the goodness that sits in the hearts, minds and souls of mankind, if given half a chance.

    See it and be amazed at what real moviemaking is all about.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Destruction of the innocent by the evils of the society
    Destruction of the innocent by the evils of the society
    Kuldip Kumar Garhwal

    "Mockingbirds don't do one thing but... sing their heart out for us. That's why it is a sin to kill a mockingbird." The movie 'To kill a mockingbird' depicts the destruction of the innocent by the evils of the society. Mockingbird is a symbol of innocence, characterized by Tom Robinson and Arthur Radley (Boo) where racial prejudice and ignorance are the symbol of evils in the society.

    Tom Robinson, an African-American is accused by Mayela, a white woman, of sexual molestation. Atticus, a prominent lawyer of the town Maycomb, has proved that Tom Robinson is innocent but still the "all-white jury" convicts Robinson of the guilt. Tom Robinson, a "quite humble respectable Negro", becomes the victim of racial prejudice. Arthur Radley (Boo) has been emotionally destroyed by his father, as his father did not let him step outside the house. Boo is one of the "mockingbirds" in the story, who is the victim of ignorance; evil of the society which is trying to kill the good. Boo had a deep affection for children, which is later displayed in the story, when Boo saves Jim and Scout from Bob Ewells.

    "There are some men in the world who are born to do unpleasant jobs for us; your father is one of them", said Maudie to Jim after his father (Atticus) lost the case of Tom Robinson. Atticus helped his children to learn values of life and he showed them how to live life by the values; preaching by practicing. Atticus allowed his children to call him by his name instead of 'father'. He wanted his children to explore freedom, but also taught them to stay in limits. Jim is brave, intelligent, and caring. He learns courage, dignity, and value of life from his father. He is transforming into adulthood.

    Scout is still a kid; she does not know anything about the existence of evil in the society. She is learning about evils from the real life example of the victims (Tom and Boo) of the evils in the society. By the end of the story Scout's perspective on life develops from that of an innocent child into that of a near grown up. "Mr. Tate was right", said Scout to Atticus, after Mr. Tate, the town Sheriff explained Atticus indirectly that whatever Boo did was correct and he is not supposed to be punished for that. "It would be like shooting the mockingbird, wouldn't it." Scout shows a high level of ability to comprehend at the age of five, and understands the whole situation and judges what is right and what is wrong.

    The Music Director of the movie has done an excellent job. Music plays an important role in the movie, by setting the mood for what is been screened. The movie starts with a musical note, which seems like it is played by a kid, one note at a time. The movie also has gothic music to create the horrifying or thrilling environment, when Jim and Scout were walking home after the Halloween Party and they had an encounter with Bob Ewells. Most of the places the movie has melancholy music to produce the feeling of thoughtful sadness. The pleasant arrangements of musical notes in the movie create an atmosphere where we feel that we are a part of the movie, and we go back into our nostalgic memories and look back into our childhood. The movie itself seems like a mockingbird song.

    My favorite scene in the movie is when Atticus is walking out of the courtroom after the trial is over and all the "colored" people sitting in the balcony stands up to pay respect to Atticus, a white man, who tried his level best to save a "Negro." The Reverend says to Scout who was sitting, "Stand up Jean Louise. Your father is passing." The scene says it all, there is not much dialogue but the expressions on the faces of the black people was marvelous, with a slow melancholy music at the background. As it this situation there is nothing left to say, because everyone knows in the courtroom that Tom Robinson is not guilty but still the jury has convicted him of the rape, just because of racial prejudice.

    _____________________________________________

    Kuldip Kumar Garhwal(...)

    5-0 out of 5 stars To Kill a Mockingbird is like a sin
    'To Kill A Mockingbird' is of course the movie adaptation of Harper Lee's movie with the same title. Gregory Peck is a lawyer in rural Mississippi who is asked to defend a black man accused of raping a white woman.

    The movie starts however with a seemingly unrelated event, the lives of Atticus Finch's two children. His daughter is a tomboy and his son is trying to keep her from getting into more trouble. The stumble upon some strange items and look at the house of a strange man called Boo Radley.

    Then the movie goes into the court case. It is of course very obvious that the black man is innocent, but this is 1930's South with an all white jury...

    Then the two parts of the movie come back together again...

    The acting in this movie (in black and white) is superb. I recall that Gregory Pecks perfomance was voted the best of the century. Even the little girl is superb, she even got a nominatation for an oscar. Boo Radley is played by Robert Duvall, though he says next to nothing and is only in the movie for a few minutes. He of course 10 years later would play Tom Hayden in The Godfather. For Star Trek fans: Tom Robinson, the black man accused, is Sisko's Father of DS9

    5-0 out of 5 stars Its children¿s world that evolves with racial prejudice
    We shall say "To kill a mockingbird" is a classic of the century that unfolds reality into film with profound simplicity. Its character development along with the approach of realism supersedes many contemporary works of literature and film. The historic flavor of the film creates an impression of a southern community of America during the great depression. Apparently the quintessential theme of the movie is the social stigma and prejudice. We see conflicts between the blacks and whites in the same community where justice has upheld my one of the central character called atticus.

    Tom Robinson, a black guy living in the same town called Mayconb was one of the central characters in the movie has been accused of raping a white woman. However, eventually he was convicted as guilty of charge and subjected to unfair justice system by the ignorant majority that have taken part in the jury. But there were other themes that also have significance to its crafts also. Its amazing reality of children's life that is so universal. It created a reality of vividing contention that helps the viewers to understand how the children see and think about the world. It also calls into attention of the activities that children by their vary nature involve in a family. For instance, Scout and Jem who are the central characters have enormous interests in scary yet joyful venture to Boo Radly's house even after being forbidden by their father. It was also important to observe how the children have collected gifts from the tree given by a isolated guy who they never been acquainted with.

    The phenomenal curiosity of children is almost inescapable from the viewer's notice in the movie. They were inquisitive in every detail of what has been happening around them. That gives us the idea of their emotional reopens to the world and family relationships. As you will see, if you watch the movie, their father atticuls who has been a significant moral authority to them. He has great influence on how they develop the ideas of people and differences of good and evil that remain in their fantasy world.

    The story of the movie has a unique way to tell you about a community and what is going on to its families. It takes us to the journey to reflect on our own childhood fantasy world and the adventures that still remains in our mind a thrill. ... Read more


    3. Sliver
    Director: Phillip Noyce
    list price: $14.95
    (price subject to change: see help)
    Asin: 6302909651
    Catlog: Video
    Sales Rank: 1326
    Average Customer Review: 3.89 out of 5 stars
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    Amazon.com

    After her success with Basic Instinct, Sharon Stone opted for familiar territory with this campfest that purports to be a sexualized thriller about voyeurism but in reality is more of an excuse to get Stone and costar William Baldwin out of their clothes. Rear Window it ain't. Stone plays it drab and quiet as a successful career woman on the rebound from a bad marriage who moves into a mysterious Manhattan high-rise. Once there, she discovers that she has a few admirers: a hunky and enigmatic neighbor (Baldwin), a popular writer of crime novels (Tom Berenger), and someone who seems to enjoy watching her every move on the building-wide surveillance system. And is one of them the serial killer who's stalking the comely female tenants? Scripted by the erstwhile Joe Eszterhas (Basic Instinct and Jagged Edge), Sliver follows the standard Eszterhas plot line of a protagonist suspecting that his or her lover may or may not be a vicious killer, the tension mounting as clue upon clue is discovered. Unlike both Instinct or Edge, though, Sliver delivers little suspense, thanks in part to a reshot ending that changed the original identity of the killer in the Ira Levin novel and confounded students of rational thought. However, if you're looking for an unintentionally funny thriller with loads of extraneous nudity, Sliver is an enjoyably huge hunk of cheese. --Mark Englehart ... Read more

    Reviews (36)

    2-0 out of 5 stars Stone in yet another over-charged sex-thriller.
    This super-sleazy sex-mystery features Sharon Stone as a lonely book editor who moves into a handsome, slender Manhattan apartment building(the "Sliver" of the title), and later learns that it is the scene of a series of brutal and unsolved murders. Unfortunately, this filmization of Ira Levin's reasonably suspenseful novel focuses more on Stone's steamy relationship with practicing voyeur William Baldwin rather than the mystery/suspense angle. This muddled mess was obviously an ill-fated attempt to cash in on the success of "Basic Instinct" and attract that same audience, but it was all for naught because "Sliver" still crashed and burned at the box-office. Admittedly, there are several hot and heavy sex scenes, but they would be more at home in a hardcore skin flick rather than a film like this that tries to pass itself off as a suspenseful murder mystery. The unrated version features several minutes worth of even more sexually explicit material. If you're going to buy it, get the unrated version since the few sex scenes are the film's only real virtue anyway.

    5-0 out of 5 stars SLIVER, WANNA WATCH?
    Sliver is a fantastic film. The best out of all the erotic thrillers filmed between the years of 1987-1995, preferably the time in which the Erotic Thriller genre was big. Ending with Eszterhas's JADE. Eszterhas (Basic Instinct, Jade, Jagged Egde) wrote Sliver. A film starring Sharon Stone as Carly Norris, stuck in this age of loneliness after coming out of a 7 year bad marriage. Moving into a slick and sleek sliver apartment building, she is warmly welcomed by all of it's tennants. Including, Vida Warren a woman with a dark double life. Gus Hale, a man that is willing to tell all dirty little secrets. Zeke Hawkins a handsome young man that takes a sexual interest in Carly, FAST. And Tom Berenger a classy writer, with a macho jerk attitude. When Carly gets involved, very involved, with Zeke she begins to learn that inside the walls of this building hides a secret that could reveal everything. With an ending so fast paced it will blow right by you, but a very satisfying ending if I do say so in the least. Again, buy SLIVER in the unrated version, sit down and relax in the darkness and remember that there is no place more frightening than home...

    3-0 out of 5 stars Very sexy but empty
    There was a time when movies were slicker than they are now, when they pushed the buttons of sexuality/abhorrent sex. This is a lot about voyeurism and the thrill of being stalked. Sharon Stone was of course capitalizing on the Basic Instinct success. Billy Baldwin is very attarctive and they make a sexy couple but it didn't make a good movie. The soundtrack is amazing though!

    5-0 out of 5 stars LONELINESS - exemplified !!!
    Few films have a matching soundtrack.This is one of those few.
    The script is strong.The pace is quick.Actors/Actresses have done a commendable job.It's all about people , who have made good money - stable lifestyle - those who are already out of the daily rat race - who now have time for some mischief & pleasure.And , a rare combination of Money & Loneliness formulates a unique approach to life.This is it.The best that the people of this status can do in life.The beginning is simply superb - mystery commences right from shot 1 - excellent dialogue quality - absolutely no useless chatter - just to the point action & dialogues.A great addition to the collection - for sure.

    1-0 out of 5 stars So much for the "erotic thriller" genre
    Sharon Stone is Carly Norris, one of those sucessful types who, in Hollywood's mind, must be tortured by insecurity and self-loathing. She's just moved into a new building which, for its stark loveliness, leaves her feeling even more unsettled than usual. (Because Joe Ezsterhaus perpetrated the script, the regular denizens of the building are into rough and otherwise generally unconventional intercourse. Closer to Carly are two suspicious admirers ' Lanford (Tom Berenger), a hardboiled crime novelist, and the building's owner, Zeke (Billy Baldwin). Lanford telegraphs his problems in the way he introduces himself ' running into people while jogging in Central Park. Zeke has a bigger problem ' he's wired the building for sight & sound, using a hidden control center stacked with monitors and recorders on which to view whatever's going on in his building (lover's pressuring their mates into rougher sex; parents molesting their children, women shaving, etc..) When suspicion exuded by the characters isn't enough to get the story going, a string of murderers is tossed in. ... Read more


    4. Laura
    Director: Rouben Mamoulian, Otto Preminger
    list price: $12.98
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    Asin: 630266232X
    Catlog: Video
    Sales Rank: 655
    Average Customer Review: 4.78 out of 5 stars
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    This silky smooth film noir pits gruff police detective Dana Andrews, stiff and blunt in his street-bred manners, against a cultured columnist and acidic wit (Clifton Webb at his prissiest) in a battle of wits during a murder investigation. The cop is a romantic hiding under a hard-boiled exterior who falls in love with the beautiful victim through the portrait that hangs in her apartment, when one lonely night he turns from the picture to see Laura walk through the door. It's not a ghost: both the cops and the killer mistook the mutilated corpse for the lady of the house. Gene Tierney, whose heart-shaped face mixes the exotic with the girl next door, brings the poise and calm of a model to her role as Laura, the object of every man's gaze and the target of a killer that missed once but is bound to try again. Laura, handsomely shot in dreamy black and white, is the first and best of Otto Preminger's cool, controlled murder mysteries. In the gritty world of film noir it remains the most refined and elegant example of the genre, but under the tasteful decor and high-society fashions lies a world seething in jealousy, passion, blackmail, and murder. Vincent Price costars as a blithe gigolo and David Raksin's lush theme has become a wistful romantic standard. --Sean Axmaker ... Read more

    Reviews (59)

    5-0 out of 5 stars COOL, ELEGANT FILM NOIR....
    Although toned down from Vera Caspary's novel, "Laura" is a classic example of sexual obssession in 40's film noir. Otto Preminger (with help from Rouben Mamoulian) created a masterpiece of a mystery film loaded with decadence and sexual tension. Tough streetwise police detective Mark McPherson (Dana Andrews) investigates the violent society murder of beautiful, enigmatic ad exec Laura Hunt (Gene Tierney) and enters the cold, calculating world of high society where everyone has dark secrets. He encounters a list of suspects including ascerbic Waldo Lydecker (superb Clifton Webb) as Laura's "benefactor" and companion who introduced her to the high end of advertising and her gigolo fiance' Shelby (Vincent Price) who is more or less kept by Laura's aunt (Judith Anderson). It is Lydecker who matches wits with Mark every step of the way. Mark has become obssessed with Laura's portrait, her perfume and letters and has obviously fallen in love with the "dead" Laura. The sexual obssession theme lies underneath the complicated relationships including Mark's fascination with Laura's relationships and her personal things and in the flashback sequences, it is clear that Lydecker fancied himself more than just Laura's "companion". He sought to possess her. But it gets stickier as it goes along when Laura turns up very much alive. There is so much to savor in this film along with the performances (especially Webb's) like the beautiful b&w photography that gives the film a dream like quality and the lovely "Laura" them by David Raskin that haunts the film and emphasizes the romantic longing Mark has for Laura and Laura's mysterious, paradoxical personality. Any way you slice it, "Laura" is a classic film heads up above the rest and needs to be available on DVD. It is not to be missed.

    5-0 out of 5 stars A MUST SEE
    I saw this movie at least ten times. First time was in my early teens, when it was shown on local TV. I never heard of Gene Tierney before, but after seeing this film, I knew I would never forget her. She was the most beautiful actress I ever saw and her mannerisms reveal a classy keen intelligence. Everything about this movie will haunt you--Tierney's beauty, the musical score by David Raksin, the portrait, and the ending.

    The film is about a woman who seemed to have everything--a successful career, beauty, brains, wealth--who is discovered murdered in her apartment. A detective, Mark McPherson, played by Dana Andrews investigates the case and starts questioning possible suspects. One is the Svengali-like Waldo Lydecker (Clifton Webb), a syndicated columnist and radio personality. Another is Shelby Carpenter, a smooth Southern gigolo played by Vincent Price (yes Vincent Price!). And there's Laura's middle-aged socialite aunt, Ann Treadwell, who was using Carpenter as her boy-toy until Carpenter meets Laura. Other possible suspect is Laura's maid, a feisty loyal Irishwoman.

    The film shows narrated flashbacks by Lydecker. He idolizes her and intercepts Laura's suitors, all of whom he considers beneath her. He couldn't intercept Carpenter who attracts Laura, and who Laura was supposed to marry the week she was found murdered. The first twist of the film is when McPherson falls in love with Laura, who's presumed dead. From reading her diary and letters and continuously seeing her portrait, he discovers she's the woman of his dreams, an unattainable goddess whose physical presence he can only imagine. So when twist number two happens, the murder investigation understandably becomes secondary to this gumshoe detective.

    This is the best film directed by Otto Preminger. I believe it's the first American film he directed, and his following films pale by comparison. Ironically, this is a film full of second choices. The lead was written with Jennifer Jones in mind, but she turned it down. It was then offered to Heddy Lamarr who also turned it down. Tierney claimed in her autobiography that she didn't want the role either and thought the film was going to bomb, due to the fact that many aspects of it were not prepared (the final script, the music) and that Dana Andrews (also a second choice) prior to this film never had a role as a leading man. The portrait that was originally intended for the film was painted by the wife of director Rouben Mamoulian, who was initially hired for the film but was fired by Preminger who was producing it. Paintings don't transcribe well to film so a touched-up photograph of Tierney was used as the portrait. Preminger took the directing himself. He wanted to use the song "Sophisticated Lady" by Duke Ellington as the musical score, but David Raksin made a deal with him, in which he would write a score Preminger would approve of in one weekend. Raksin claimed he kept looking at a photo of Tierney during the composition of the score and that she was his inspiration. Thus second choices made this movie a classic.

    The dialogue is witty and biting, particularly that of Lydecker. The film was nominated for Best Adapted Screenplay, Best Supporting Actor (Webb), Best Black and White Cinematography and Best Musical Score. It only won for Best Cinematography, and I'd like to learn what films aced it in the other categories. Although awards are not considered important by many film connoisserus, the winners are the ones recognized by the next generation. Thus "Laura" remains one of the most underrated films of all time.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Revised Release Date
    Fox now says Laura will be out November 04. We can just hope this is not just another tease after first announcing Sept 03. Are lawyers involved in this delay?

    5-0 out of 5 stars Release date
    The review from Utica is correct: Laura was supposed to be out 9/03. It's been on my wish list for almost a year. Maybe Fox should get Eisner to oversee releases (he must be looking for something to do).

    1-0 out of 5 stars Wasn't this supposed to be out on DVD last November?
    I ordered this DVD early LAST YEAR, and it is yet to be released. There are so many mediocre if not downright awful films that are always being released onto video and DVD, yet this film, which is truly one of the best classics of all time, is still not available. What is Fox doing? ... Read more


    5. Hush ... Hush, Sweet Charlotte
    Director: Robert Aldrich
    list price: $19.98
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    Asin: 6301798562
    Catlog: Video
    Sales Rank: 351
    Average Customer Review: 4.57 out of 5 stars
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    Poor Charlotte Hollis. She's been shunned by the community for decades, ever since the fateful night in 1927 when her lover was hacked apart with an axe. Her antebellum southern mansion is slated for the bulldozer, as it stands in the way of highway construction. Charlotte's only hope lies in her cousin Miriam (Olivia de Havilland), coming down from up north to help settle things. Miriam, however, has other designs. Together with her boyfriend Drew (Joseph Cotten), she embarks on a scheme to systematically drive Charlotte out of her mind (not a great leap) and get her mitts on the family fortune. From there, things only get more complicated. Charlotte puts the "gothic" in southern gothic, as a great showcase for completely bizarre, overwrought, and out-of-control performances from all involved. Agnes Moorehead plays Charlotte's loyal, disheveled housekeeper to the hilt, with an odd inflection that calls to mind Amos and Andy more than southern gentility. As the drunken, conniving Dr. Drew, Cotten's accent is indeterminate at times, and seems to come and go. As great as the supporting players are, though, the crown goes to Bette Davis as the shrieking Charlotte, a portrait of isolation and decay stuck in a world oftragic delusions inside her crumbling mansion. De Havilland is a close second as the scheming Miriam; the scene where she slaps the holy snot out of a hysterical Charlotte is itself worth the price of admission. Mary Astor (in her last role) and Cecil Kellaway (as a kindly Lloyd's of London adjuster) put in the only performances with any restraint, acting as counterweights for the rest of the cast. Besides, you'll never get another chance to see Joseph Cotten playing the harpsichord andsinging, or caked in mud and lily pads! With Robert Aldrich's claustrophobicdirection, Charlotte is as Southern as a field of kudzu, and as subduedas a train wreck. --Jerry Renshaw ... Read more

    Reviews (46)

    4-0 out of 5 stars Olivia De Havilland is the best part if this movie.
    This is a good, creepy horror movie, although the plot is a big old mess. Bette Davis is quite annoying-- she was so good in "Whatever Happened to Baby Jane?" that she almost seems over-confident here. She just hams it up, and it gets annoying. Olivia De Havilland, on the other hand, is brilliant. There's something incredibly engrossing-- almost amusing-- at how harsh and bitchy she is. What adds to the amusing quality of her character is the datedness of her hair and clothing (she's supposed to seem very chic and fashionable, but by 1965 standards). Anyway, I think Olivia proves to be just as good a villain as any woman in any movie-- she's convincingly vile. And as much as I like Joan Crawford, I don't think she would have done as good a job in the role. I remember seeing the film as a child and being freaked out when Miriam beats up Charlotte in the car. This was a VERY violent and harsh scene back in those days-- especially for a female role.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Davis dominates this southern fried chiller
    Bette Davis attacks the role of tarnished southern belle Charlotte Hollis, a woman who's been haunted by demons in her past.Hush... Hush allows Miss Davis to display her formidable talents as both vixen and victim. Charlotte believes she is responsible for the violent death of her lover. When her cousin Miriam comes a-calling Charlotte thinks Miriam's there to help her hang on to her decaying gothic mansion.Charlotte soon begins hearing and seeing ominous things, which doesn't improve her fragile state of mind.The cinematography, score, and performances give this unsettling thriller a real jolt.The scenes with Bette and Olivia de Havilland (Miriam) near the finale are fabulous. Better still is the scene with Bette getting a terrible fright at the top of Charlotte's staircase. Awesome film starring the most compelling and versatile actress ever on film!

    4-0 out of 5 stars Hush Hush Sweet Charlotte
    This is a great movie to watch on a windswept stormy night.

    I wish the DVD companies would get their act together so I don't have to keep making my own DVD's of these great film classics and creature feature movies.

    Would love to see this on DVD in Widescreen!!!

    4-0 out of 5 stars Campy Fun
    This movie is too over-the-top not to give it a full four stars (but not five--hey, it's not THAT good!). The movie was to be a "sort-of" sequel to Baby Jane, reuniting arch rivals Joan and Bette. But Joan (though I love her!) went a little too far for Aldrich, who canned her after she had spent weeks in the hospital feigning illness. However, Olivia diHavilland does a good job. Ultimately the movie is fun...yet oddly effective. And you'll be singing the theme song in your head for days!

    Some great insanity by Bette, some cheesy gore, and a few genuine thrills make for a piece of schlock that rocks!

    5-0 out of 5 stars Three Stars of Yesteryear In Terrific Gothic Thriller
    The 1960's decade saw alot of veteran performers who had their acting heyday in the 1930's and 40's moving into psychological thrillers and horror efforts as a way of continuing in lead roles. Some of these efforts were of very poor quality but once in a while a gem appeared that has stood the test of time. "Hush...Hush Sweet Charlotte", was such an effort and boasted the talents of three seasoned acting legends in the unstoppable Bette Davis, Olivia de Havilland and Joseph Cotton. Bette Davis indeed had one of her better later day roles in this film which followed on from her huge success in 1962's "Whatever Happened to Baby Jane". Contrary to popular belief however this film was not a sequel to that earlier success as it had an entirely different locale, story and set of characters. The film did not get off to a promising start production wise in that it was originally planned as a reteaming of Bette with rival Joan Crawford. The two had scored a total triumph with "Baby Jane", however due to a number of circumstances Crawford withdrew and after offering the role of Cousin Miriam to Vivien Leigh among others, director Robert Aldrich passed the role to a most reluctant de Havilland who didn't relish the chance to play the villianess of the piece.

    "Hush ...Hush Sweet Charlotte", takes place in the decaying Old South of the 1960's. Bette Davis plays reclusive Charlotte Hollis who lives on her own in her run down Southern mansion that many years before saw a ghastly murder take place that robbed her of her one chance at personal happiness with young married John Mayhew (Bruce Dern). His brutal murder by a meatcleaver is shown in a flash back sequence after which the story moves to the present where the unsettled Charlotte finds her formally grand Louisiana home under threat by the bulldozers. Failing to scare off the workmen with a shotgun Charlotte writes to her cousin, the worldly Miriam Deering to ask for help in saving her property. Childhood rivals for the attentions of Charlotte's father Big Sam Hollis (Victor Buono) at first Miriam seems sweet and kind and totally concerned for Charlotte's welfare however all is not what it seems especially when Miriam teams up with old beau Dr. Drew Bayliss (Joseph Cotton) to see what is in the estate for them. Before long Charlotte is literally being driven out of her mind as she experiences what she thinks are nightmarish visions of her dead lover reappearing minus his hand and head , heads rolling down the staircase, eeerie voices calling out to her in the night and finally a belief that she has actually shot Drew by mistake. As her mental state starts to crumble and she is the victim of some mind numbing drugs courtesy of Drew, the old housekeeper Velma (Agnes Moorehead in an Oscar nominated performance), begins to work out what the pair are up to. That knowledge however eventually costs her her life . While at the mercy of the scheming Drew and Miriam, Charlotte however is not defenceless and when she finally discovers the truth of what has been going on she enacts her own revenge that frees her of the pair forever. Only after the intervention of visiting writer Harry Willis (Cecil Kellaway)who had an enduring interest in Charlotte's case, does she finally learn (only as she leaves her home for the last time), the real truth behind who murdered her childhood beau all those years ago.

    The story of "Hush...Hush Sweet Charlotte", while fairly obvious does make riverting viewing and the large cast of veteran performers really show their expertise and years of experience in their parts. Bette Davis for once gets to play the potential victim of the piece and it is Olivia de Havilland, so often associated with kindly, sympathetic characters that really has a field day as the evil Miriam intent upon getting Charlotte's money for herself. These two women had worked together many times during their heyday at Warner Brothers but rarely has their screen work had the electricity that it does here. The scene where they supposedly dump Drew's body is sensational as Miriam for the first time really shows her evil menace and it is some of the best work that Olivia de Havilland did on screen. The supporting cast is top rate as well and full of wonderful character actors such as the already mentioned Agnes Morrehead who steals every scene she is in as the uncouth but devoted housekeeper. Cecil Kellaway, Victor Buono who had also been in Aldrich's previous "Baby Jane" effort and Ellen Corby all bring their special expertise to the large and small supporting roles and veteran Mary Astor makes a rare 1960's appearance in the important role of elderly Jewel Mayhew, John's jealous wife. Blessed with a much bigger budget than on his earlier "Baby Jane", project Aldrich was able to make good use of beautiful locations at a great old Southern Mansion in Baton Rouge. This really aids the spooky elements of this horror story and the stark black and white photography is a great asset in particular during Charlotte's ghostly nightmare sequences.

    For a trip down memory lane when veterans like Bette Davis and Olivia de Havilland still appeared in major productions with roles tailored to them, "Hush ...Hush Sweet Charlotte", is unsurpassed entertainment. Certainly the special effects may seem tame by today's standards but the joy here is to see two actress's giving these roles their all. Davis and de Havilland make a great screen team and compared to the other "monsters" she often played in the 1960's it's a joy to see Bette Davis playing a victim role for a change. Gothic melodrama of the first order perhaps but hugely entertaining and sure to create a few chills along the way. Highly recommended for all old style mystery lovers. ... Read more


    6. The Godfather, Part II
    Director: Francis Ford Coppola
    list price: $14.95
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    Asin: 630021639X
    Catlog: Video
    Sales Rank: 95
    Average Customer Review: 4.73 out of 5 stars
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    Francis Ford Coppola took some of the deep background from the life of Mafia chief Vito Corleone--the patriarch of Mario Puzo's bestselling novel The Godfather--and built around it a stunning sequel to his Oscar-winning, 1972 hit film. Robert De Niro plays Vito as a young Sicilian immigrant in turn-of-the-century New York City's Little Italy. Coppola weaves in and out of the story of Vito's transformation into a powerful crime figure, contrasting that evolution against efforts by son Michael Corleone to spread the family's business into pre-Castro Cuba. As memorable as the first film is, The Godfather II is an amazingly intricate, symmetrical tragedy that touches upon several chapters of 20th-century history and makes a strong case that our destinies are written long before we're born. This was De Niro's first introduction to a lot of filmgoers, and he makes an enormous impression. But even with him and a number of truly brilliant actors (including maestro Lee Strasberg), this is ultimately Pacino's film and a masterful performance. --Tom Keogh ... Read more

    Reviews (82)

    5-0 out of 5 stars I know it was you Fredo
    Director Francis Ford Coppola does the impossible with this film. He creates an original piece better than its wonderful predecessor! After the phenomenal success of the GODFATHER, Coppola didn't have the studio watching every move he made like a hawk, and the results are a better, more diverse film. He lifted a concept he was saving for another movie, one where a father's story and his son's story are intermingled, comparing them both at the same age. Robert DeNiro won an Oscar for his mostly silent portrayal of the soft-spoken Italian, Vito Corleone, played by Marlon Brando in the first film. This was the first time in history that two people were both given an Oscar for portraying the same character. Running parallel with Vito's story is the continuing saga of Michael Corleone, Al Pacino returning to play the crime boss. His Michael has grown into a man bent on his own fate, battling hubris like a Shakespeare character. The production design and music are once again wonderful, Vito's past is a gorgeous pastiche of immigrants at the turn of the previous century, while Michael now rules an empire that extended into the sleazy world of gambling. Coppola uses some of the same tricks as the first film (If it ain't broke...). The result is a three-hour plus tragedy that is sure to make a hit with you. The first 2 films together make for interesting viewing. On occasion, they have even been needlessly presented chronologically. Followed by an unfortunate third film.

    5-0 out of 5 stars The apex of American film making
    To call The Godfather 2 a sequal would be a travesty and an unfair conclusion on what a stunning achievement the film was. Not only is it the greatest sequal of all time (the only one to receive the best film oscar, at the expense of the brilliant Chinatown) but perhaps the greatest movie of all time.

    It's an even more towering achievement than it's predecessor with Coppola now telling in parallel the rise of Vito Corleone from a seemingly harmless kid fleeing Sicily at the turn of the century to a fully fledged Mafia Don(now De Niro)in his twenties, contrasted with his son Michael carrying on the Sicilian legacy in 1950s New York.

    The intricacy of the flashback sequences is suitably stunning as is the flawless design of both time periods, especially that of 1910s New York. The costume design and focus on detail are simply immaculate with De Niro delivering an electrifying portrayal of the young Vito(speaking Italian for much of his part) as he becomes a player with a gun wrapped under a towel and hoarsely imitates Brando at one stage "I'm gonna make him an offer he can't refuse."

    Both won Oscars for their portrayal of Vito but i believe it is De Niro who excels more, not relying on the heavy makeup Brando was employed with for the first film but again proving his versatility of being a method actor and a natural gift of playing gangsters. However, it is often argued that Panino tops De Niro's peformance. He delivers a masterfully cold and distant performance as Michael, carrying on the family business after his father's death (much to his brother Fredo's disapproval).

    He moves scrupulously and speaks with rivetting conviction as he attempts to protect his family from the corruption and threat of the era. While being corrupt himself, Michael is also a caring family figure, doing all he can to end this power struggle for the sake of protecting his children. At one stage his wife Kay Adams(Diane Keaton) threatens to take his children away from him but Pacino makes his feelings clear "You know that could never be possible. You know i would do anything in my power to stop that from happening."

    The supporting cast are also great, with maestro Lee Strasberg, Robert Duvall also picking up Oscar nominations. At 3 hours and 20 minutes the movie doesn't seem overlong at all. It's an emotional powerful study in family loyalty, betrayal, corruption and greed and the apex of American filmaking. Movies don't come more accomplished or perfect than The Godfather 2. An oustanding piece of showmanship and one of the most important forms of art in any medium.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Even better than the first!
    I watched this version first and I've always liked this movie more than the first because it ties up loose ends and it gives you a better understanding of who the family is, where they came from, the origin of the Corleone name (The family name is Andolini, the town he comes from is Corleone.), etc. I wished Richard Castellano was in this one (He wouldn't because of a contract dispute.). His replacements were classic. Michael V. Gazzo & Lee Strasberg give outstanding performances in their roles. This is an epic tale never to be forgotten.

    5-0 out of 5 stars A VERY AMAZING SEQUEL TO A VERY AMAZING MOVIE
    THE STORY CONTINUES AS MICHAEL CORLEONE [AL PACINO] CONTINUES HIS DECEASED FATHER'S BUSINESS. THIS SEQUEL SUCCEEDS IN BEING WHAT MANY OTHER SEQUELS COULD NEVER BE, A GOOD MOVIE, MATTER OF FACT, AN OUTSTANDING MOVIE. ALONG WITH ITS PREDECESSOR, THIS IS ONE OF THE GREATEST MOVIES OF ALL TIME. THIS SEQUEL IS VERY AMAZING, AND I RECCOMEND ALL GANGSTER MOVIE BUFFS GET THIS AND ITS PREDECESSOR ON TAPE OR DVD AS SOON AS POSSIBLE. LIKE THE 1ST MOVIE, THIS WON SEVERAL OSCARS, INCLUDING BEST PICTURE.

    5-0 out of 5 stars great character study, great acting
    I love this movie even more than Part I, because I love the way you can see Michael's character disintegrating over the course of the story. You watch him strip away all human connections in order to protect the "family." He finally asks his mother "Can you lose your family?" She doesn't understand the question, but of course Michael has lost his family, as well as his own soul. The paradox in this--killing your family in order to protect the "family"--is wonderful.
    As in Part I, Diane Keaton is kind of a weak link--just not a credible Mafia wife. De Niro gives one of the greatest performances ever--channeling Brando. I also love the young versions of Don Corleone's sidekicks when they first go into business doing things like stealing rugs. And Robert Duvall has had to work very hard ever since to equal this performance.
    The only disappointment is that we don't get to see Sonny (James Caan), since he was killed in Part I. His role was so wonderful that it's a pity Coppola couldn't work him into the flashbacks of Part II, except in the brief final scene. ... Read more


    7. Lifeboat
    Director: Alfred Hitchcock
    list price: $12.98
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    Asin: 6301798732
    Catlog: Video
    Sales Rank: 504
    Average Customer Review: 4.64 out of 5 stars
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    Part mystery, part wartime polemic, Lifeboat finds director Alfred Hitchcock tackling a cinematic challenge that foreshadows the self-imposed handicaps of Rope and Rear Window. As with those subsequent features, Hitchcock confines his action and characters to a single set, in this instance the lone surviving lifeboat from an Allied freighter sunk by a German U-boat in the North Atlantic. A less confident, ingenious filmmaker might have opened up John Steinbeck's dialogue-driven character study beyond the battered boat and its cargo of survivors, but Hitchcock instead revels in his predicament to exploit the enforced intimacy between his characters.

    Indeed, we never actually see the doomed freighter--the smoking ship's funnel beneath the credits simply sinks beneath the waves, and we're plunged into the escalating tensions between those who gradually find their way to the boat, a band of eight English and American passengers and crew, plus a German sailor (Walter Slezak) rescued from the U-boat, itself destroyed by the freighter's deck gun. Heading the cast and inevitably commanding their and our attention is the cello-voiced Tallulah Bankhead as Connie Porter, a cynical, sophisticated writer whose priorities seem to be hanging onto her mink and keeping her lipstick fresh. Gradually, the others find Porter and her lifeboat, forming a temporary community that inevitably suggests a careful cross section of archetypes, from wealthy industrialist (Henry Hull) to ship's boiler men (John Hodiak and William Bendix).

    Hitchcock juggles the interpersonal skirmishes between the boat's occupants with the mystery of their German prisoner, which itself becomes a meditation on the fine line between nationalism and morality, a line that Slezak walks delicately until his identity is resolved. Visually, Hitchcock transforms his back-lot set and its rear-projected cloudbanks into a desolate stretch of ocean, while capturing the horror of an amputation through an economical set of images culminating in an empty boot. --Sam Sutherland ... Read more

    Reviews (22)

    5-0 out of 5 stars A Forgotten Film From The Master Of Suspense
    Lifeboat where do i begin? well for starters i guess it would have to be that this is one of my all time favorite Films from Alfred Hitchcock. But to most people they have never heard of Lifeboat. Yeah it was one of his early works but one of his best. Most people when they think of Hitchcock they think of Psycho ans The Birds and Vertigo. But this is better than the birds. It has a human story and ever increasing the tension. In a by gone era of hollywood when movies were grand in spectical not budget.

    Lifeboat is about a freighter that is heading to New York. But is sunk by a German U-boat and in the opening scenes there is Tallulah Bankhead in a lifeboat all by herself with all of her belongings. Then one by one they pick up more survivors the tension increasing when they pick up a crewman of the U-boat. Only Hitchcock would make his backlot movie with fake clouds seem so real and make a the ocean look vast and barren. He also manages to elict good performances from Bankhead,Walter Slezak, Canada Lee and others.

    I would highly reccomend that you check out this film from the master of suspense. this is not to be missed of put of. It is very suspensful i mean would you come to expect less from Hitchcock.

    SEE THIS MOVIE I BEG YOU.

    4-0 out of 5 stars Lesser Known Hitchcock
    Lifeboat isn't as famous as some of Hitchcock's other films, but it deserves to be seen today. It's a chance to see Tallulah Bankhead, who if anything, had a very interesting screen presence. She was an original. It's also a chance to see a very human portrayal of an African American character (Canada Lee) at a time when Hollywood rarely did that. There is also a lot of commentary about the Germans and the war, which given the time when this film was made (during the war), makes it all the more fascinating. The performances are good (including a very young Hume Cronyn), and Hitchcock manages to keep the action moving despite having so limited a space in which to do so. If you like Alfred Hitchcock, this is one you should see.

    5-0 out of 5 stars BANKHEAD -- HITCHCOCK
    Tallulah Bankhead was one of the 20th century's best actresses, taking over from Ethel Barrymore as the Toast of Broadway and the London stage. She made few films, and this is her best role. (For a very long time the joke was that Bankhead's stage roles were taken over by and became film hits for Bette Davis. Certainly that's true with Hellman's THE LITTLE FOXES.) Here, one has the opportunity to observe how an actress of supreme talent, handles a role in which everything is shown; in which practically nothing can be hidden. Every would-be actress ought to study not only what she does, but more importantly, what she doesn't do, for as a stage acress par excellence all through her younger years, some movie people thought her too big for the screen. Probably she wasn't, but simply needed a good director. Here, she got the best in the business, and the results show.

    Hitchcock was fascinated with women, with actresses, and particularly beautiful ones. And, if Connie's beauty here, is not young, and fresh, it is nevertheless, compelling. She is like a thoroughbred mare among mules and cab nags in an auction pen of chance. She stands out because of her breeding. She has lines. Her costume? A white silk blouse, good nylons, a full-length mink coat, and a diamond bracelet. And, of course, that wonderful mane of hair.

    If you study Hitchcock, it would make a wonderful double bill to see LIFEBOAT and STAGE FRIGHT close together. Here, he studies Bankhead; in STAGEFRIGHT he studies Dietrich; two fair-haired actresses of wildly differing personal style, but of exceptional power and interest. And, what they have in common and what both display in these two films, is their unusual, and unusually expressive voices. Bankhead was a famous radio actress for many years, as well as a stage star. Dietrich too was a radio actress, and all her life was a singer and recording artist. The trick in working with an artist with an exceptional voice, is to carefully trim and arrange the dialogue in such a way as best to show off the voice's characteristics.

    Admirers of Lesbian Chic might want to imagine what Ann Sheridan, or Barbara Stanwick, Rosalind Russell, Ruth Hussey or Lizabeth Scott or any one of a number of others might have done with this "Contralto" role: You know, the wise-cracking, hard boiled newspaper dame. The role is a Type, very popular during the 30's, and with a lesser actress and a lesser director, we might have gotten a good movie out of the material, but not a black-and-white masterpiece, like this one. After all, what if CASABLANCA had been cast with Ronald Raegan and Heddy Lamarr?

    You can watch this movie over and over. A director's tour de force, the trick, I think, is to watch for Hitchcock's cutting sequences; the way he manipulated the editing around the actors' speeches within the episodes. Extremely clever. So good, the seams are nearly invisible.

    Its a great propaganda movie, but of an unusual kind; far subtler than most. Its a great Camp, or G/L movie, but again, far subtler than most. Its a great Murder movie too, etc., etc...

    5-0 out of 5 stars Great.
    'Lifeboat' is a great film by the late Alfred Hitchcock. He is really truly a master of filmmaking and very few directors could make such a fantastic story from such a limited setting. Not many people know of the film, but one should definately check it out.

    4-0 out of 5 stars Hitchcock in a Tank?
    A very nice ensemble cast delivers the claustrophobia in this
    "Lifeboat"

    Heather Angel and Henry Hull always seem to be least recognized in this drama although thw whole cast is seemless .

    Bill Bendix could walways play comedy or drama with equal terms.
    I think a Dick Cavett story on Bankhead and Chico Marx may be in order. " Chico said " I want to ... You" and Bankhead , always the wit said " and so you shall young man" !

    Slezak on the other hand was always an actor who used his rubber face to great effect. Watch out for waves and few script flaws but stay dry ! ... Read more


    8. To Kill a Mockingbird
    Director: Robert Mulligan
    list price: $14.98
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    Asin: B000005XKO
    Catlog: Video
    Sales Rank: 1363
    Average Customer Review: 4.69 out of 5 stars
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    Reviews (220)

    5-0 out of 5 stars EVERYONE SHOULD SEE THIS MOVIE
    Truman Capote's influence is felt everywhere in both the book and film versions of TO KILL A MOCKINGBIRD, Harper Lee's classic, beautifully haunting story of childhood, innocence lost, and of the cruelty that exists in people everywhere. Yes, Gregory Peck is Atticus Finch, and all of the players here inhabit their roles with grace, humor and gravity, but it is Mary Badham as Scout who steals the show, as it should be. The simplicity of a father's touch, of a rapist's grimace, of the wind gently blowing through the trees at dusk -- everything in this movie evokes, from Scout's point of view, a time we each have in our lives that transforms us into adults. There comes with it an aching sadness -- as if saying goodbye to a comforting old friend -- but the revelation carries with it a profound joy. Elmer Bernstein's score realizes each emotional chord of the film, and transports us without ever lambasting us -- it is the best kind of movie score. You will be hooked from the opening credits, which are creatively brilliant -- those crayons, the haunting and beguiling theme softly begins on the piano -- through to the closing credits, at which point there will be well-earned tears softly falling down your cheek.

    5-0 out of 5 stars The Summer We Discovered Life
    Every so often, as surely as night follows day, a film comes along that manages to transport us from our everyday lives and into a time and place that is recalled through memories of better and in a reversal of fortunes, turbulent times. To Kill A Mockingbird is such a film.

    In a Pulitzer Prize winning novel by Harper Lee, the small town of Macomb, Alabama is portrayed in the summer of 1932, during the deepest depression that the United States had ever experienced. Over the course of the next year and a half, events will burrow inside this sleepy southern town and the lives of its residents will be transported by actions, ideas, perceptions and convictions that will influence one and all in ways that will ring true for years to come.

    Atticus Finch (Gregory Peck) is a lawyer and widower, raising two small children, Scout (Mary Badham) and her older brother Jem (Phillip Alford). Into their lives enters a visitor, Dill (John Megna) from Meridian, Mississippi, come to spend two weeks with his Aunt Stephanie (Alice Ghostley). Macomb is a town with nothing to do and if there were, no money to spend on it. The stage is being set for a life shattering episode that will not go quietly into that good night.

    Childhood holds its fascinations, its myths, its coming of age and through the eyes of the three children, the audience is allowed to peer into the adult world around them as perceived through the minds and souls of innocence that will be all too easily shattered as time whistles down the track. One of the stories woven so masterfully within its covers is the local urban legend of bogeyman, Boo Radley (Robert Duval), who lives on the same block as the Finch family. In a narration, rather like playing telephone, his persona takes on all the familiar attributes of a raving lunatic, a monster out for blood. His aura becomes the end all for Scout, Jem and Dill as they seek to master the mystery surrounding Boo and the ability to live to tell the tale!

    Into this world of innocence, a shattering crescendo of complexity wraps itself in the lives of the townspeople in the form of an alleged rape of a white woman, Mayella Violet Ewell (Collin Wilcox) by a black man, Tom Robinson (Brock Peters). Atticus Finch is called upon to act as counsel for Robinson and in doing so, the stage has been set for a dance with race relations and the exemplary lengths that are gone to in order to allow justice to prevail in the face of malcontent.

    The performances throughout To Kill A Mockingbird are stunning. Gregory Peck, as the gentleman lawyer, mired in small town attitudes and thoughts that were so representational in the southern gothic sphere, has collected and held a restrained order to his character, and in the process, he has allowed us all to be on the receiving end of hate as conveyed through the actions of small minds and small people. The children, especially Mary Badham, are siblings of more than a movie making venture. They show the absence of preconceived notions, and the guile of beings before the actions of adults can render their world as lost and gone with the shedding of time.

    James Anderson as Tom Ewell is the complete representation of oily slime as Mayella's father. He embodies all of the hate and prejudice that continues to be harboured to this day in the souls of those who would attempt to wield their vision of the way things should and ought to be. He has a foul baseness that lingers like a bad rash as he attempts to invoke his arguments through drunken bullying and hatred. Collin Willcox as Mayella is excruciatingly convincing as the bored, housebound white woman who tries to tempt Tom Robinson into kissing her and through her actions sets in motion a rollercoaster of tragedy to come. Her speech to the assembled courtroom is superb and as the audience, you feel her anger and resentment at having to be put in such a position, having to lie to save face and what little position she has in the town. Brock Peters as the aforementioned Robinson is equally sure in the allotted time he spends on the screen. There is a noble demeanor to his bearing, and yet we are aware of the restrictions that blacks were held to in their relationships with whites at the time.

    Robert Mulligan, the director and Horton Foote, the screenwriter, have presented us with a look into our pasts and faithfully etched a portrait of quiet and artfully rendered proportions that draw us into the canvas and the lives of those assembled. We have walked a mile in their shoes and been under their skin. Foote worried about being able to do justice to Lee's novel, but he worried for nothing. He has completely evoked an era that now rests behind clouds of dust, blown by the winds of time into oblivion.

    The cinematography by Russell Harlan and the set decoration by Oliver Emert carry us back through the courtesy of black and white to a depiction seen only in old photographs and clouding memories of those who lived in those precarious times. Black and white films seem to have had a curse thrust upon them by the younger generation today, as boring and tedious, but through the courtesies extended by Harlan and Emert, we are richer for those perceptions that would harken back throughout the pages of history.

    Elmer Bernstein's film score carries us like an old friend and helps us to make our acquaintances with the characters held within this framework. He has achieved much with a simple theme and persuades us that said simplicity is fulfilled with less rather than more.

    To Kill A Mockingbird is beautifully haunting and having been made in the 60's, at the height of the Civil Rights movement, it garners our attention to stop and take the time to truly 'see' what the human race is all about and what it can and should be, if taken over the bumps in the road and onto a path of sincere honesty and purpose. No special effects were needed, no huge Hollywood budget, no splashing of a story that had a happy ending for everyone involved. It is an open book into the realities of a world tilting temporarily off its axis, and being brought back on track through the goodness that sits in the hearts, minds and souls of mankind, if given half a chance.

    See it and be amazed at what real moviemaking is all about.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Destruction of the innocent by the evils of the society
    Destruction of the innocent by the evils of the society
    Kuldip Kumar Garhwal

    "Mockingbirds don't do one thing but... sing their heart out for us. That's why it is a sin to kill a mockingbird." The movie 'To kill a mockingbird' depicts the destruction of the innocent by the evils of the society. Mockingbird is a symbol of innocence, characterized by Tom Robinson and Arthur Radley (Boo) where racial prejudice and ignorance are the symbol of evils in the society.

    Tom Robinson, an African-American is accused by Mayela, a white woman, of sexual molestation. Atticus, a prominent lawyer of the town Maycomb, has proved that Tom Robinson is innocent but still the "all-white jury" convicts Robinson of the guilt. Tom Robinson, a "quite humble respectable Negro", becomes the victim of racial prejudice. Arthur Radley (Boo) has been emotionally destroyed by his father, as his father did not let him step outside the house. Boo is one of the "mockingbirds" in the story, who is the victim of ignorance; evil of the society which is trying to kill the good. Boo had a deep affection for children, which is later displayed in the story, when Boo saves Jim and Scout from Bob Ewells.

    "There are some men in the world who are born to do unpleasant jobs for us; your father is one of them", said Maudie to Jim after his father (Atticus) lost the case of Tom Robinson. Atticus helped his children to learn values of life and he showed them how to live life by the values; preaching by practicing. Atticus allowed his children to call him by his name instead of 'father'. He wanted his children to explore freedom, but also taught them to stay in limits. Jim is brave, intelligent, and caring. He learns courage, dignity, and value of life from his father. He is transforming into adulthood.

    Scout is still a kid; she does not know anything about the existence of evil in the society. She is learning about evils from the real life example of the victims (Tom and Boo) of the evils in the society. By the end of the story Scout's perspective on life develops from that of an innocent child into that of a near grown up. "Mr. Tate was right", said Scout to Atticus, after Mr. Tate, the town Sheriff explained Atticus indirectly that whatever Boo did was correct and he is not supposed to be punished for that. "It would be like shooting the mockingbird, wouldn't it." Scout shows a high level of ability to comprehend at the age of five, and understands the whole situation and judges what is right and what is wrong.

    The Music Director of the movie has done an excellent job. Music plays an important role in the movie, by setting the mood for what is been screened. The movie starts with a musical note, which seems like it is played by a kid, one note at a time. The movie also has gothic music to create the horrifying or thrilling environment, when Jim and Scout were walking home after the Halloween Party and they had an encounter with Bob Ewells. Most of the places the movie has melancholy music to produce the feeling of thoughtful sadness. The pleasant arrangements of musical notes in the movie create an atmosphere where we feel that we are a part of the movie, and we go back into our nostalgic memories and look back into our childhood. The movie itself seems like a mockingbird song.

    My favorite scene in the movie is when Atticus is walking out of the courtroom after the trial is over and all the "colored" people sitting in the balcony stands up to pay respect to Atticus, a white man, who tried his level best to save a "Negro." The Reverend says to Scout who was sitting, "Stand up Jean Louise. Your father is passing." The scene says it all, there is not much dialogue but the expressions on the faces of the black people was marvelous, with a slow melancholy music at the background. As it this situation there is nothing left to say, because everyone knows in the courtroom that Tom Robinson is not guilty but still the jury has convicted him of the rape, just because of racial prejudice.

    _____________________________________________

    Kuldip Kumar Garhwal(...)

    5-0 out of 5 stars To Kill a Mockingbird is like a sin
    'To Kill A Mockingbird' is of course the movie adaptation of Harper Lee's movie with the same title. Gregory Peck is a lawyer in rural Mississippi who is asked to defend a black man accused of raping a white woman.

    The movie starts however with a seemingly unrelated event, the lives of Atticus Finch's two children. His daughter is a tomboy and his son is trying to keep her from getting into more trouble. The stumble upon some strange items and look at the house of a strange man called Boo Radley.

    Then the movie goes into the court case. It is of course very obvious that the black man is innocent, but this is 1930's South with an all white jury...

    Then the two parts of the movie come back together again...

    The acting in this movie (in black and white) is superb. I recall that Gregory Pecks perfomance was voted the best of the century. Even the little girl is superb, she even got a nominatation for an oscar. Boo Radley is played by Robert Duvall, though he says next to nothing and is only in the movie for a few minutes. He of course 10 years later would play Tom Hayden in The Godfather. For Star Trek fans: Tom Robinson, the black man accused, is Sisko's Father of DS9

    5-0 out of 5 stars Its children¿s world that evolves with racial prejudice
    We shall say "To kill a mockingbird" is a classic of the century that unfolds reality into film with profound simplicity. Its character development along with the approach of realism supersedes many contemporary works of literature and film. The historic flavor of the film creates an impression of a southern community of America during the great depression. Apparently the quintessential theme of the movie is the social stigma and prejudice. We see conflicts between the blacks and whites in the same community where justice has upheld my one of the central character called atticus.

    Tom Robinson, a black guy living in the same town called Mayconb was one of the central characters in the movie has been accused of raping a white woman. However, eventually he was convicted as guilty of charge and subjected to unfair justice system by the ignorant majority that have taken part in the jury. But there were other themes that also have significance to its crafts also. Its amazing reality of children's life that is so universal. It created a reality of vividing contention that helps the viewers to understand how the children see and think about the world. It also calls into attention of the activities that children by their vary nature involve in a family. For instance, Scout and Jem who are the central characters have enormous interests in scary yet joyful venture to Boo Radly's house even after being forbidden by their father. It was also important to observe how the children have collected gifts from the tree given by a isolated guy who they never been acquainted with.

    The phenomenal curiosity of children is almost inescapable from the viewer's notice in the movie. They were inquisitive in every detail of what has been happening around them. That gives us the idea of their emotional reopens to the world and family relationships. As you will see, if you watch the movie, their father atticuls who has been a significant moral authority to them. He has great influence on how they develop the ideas of people and differences of good and evil that remain in their fantasy world.

    The story of the movie has a unique way to tell you about a community and what is going on to its families. It takes us to the journey to reflect on our own childhood fantasy world and the adventures that still remains in our mind a thrill. ... Read more


    9. The Birds
    Director: Alfred Hitchcock
    list price: $9.98
    our price: $9.98
    (price subject to change: see help)
    Asin: 0783235666
    Catlog: Video
    Sales Rank: 432
    Average Customer Review: 4.12 out of 5 stars
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    Reviews (200)

    4-0 out of 5 stars One of the best classic horror films of all time.
    My opinion of this movie, The Birds, is that it is a masterpiece of it's own time. This was a great piece of classic horror; Alfred Hitchcock did a fantastic job. The special effects were very believeable, especially for coming from the early sixties. I still haven't figured out how they got all of those birds to attack, or if half of them were fake. Also, Hitchcock did a great job of showing blood and gore when it was qppropriate, like when Jessica Tandy as Lydia Brenner finds Lonny Chapman as Deke Carter with his eyes pecked out. The movie did, however, lack music so this made it kind of drag along. Music would have paced the movie, and also added suspense and other effects. Tippi Hedren as Melanie Daniels was a bad actress. She showed no real emotion and always seemed to be worried about her appearance instead of her acting. I really noticed this in the bedroom scene, when she was being attacked, and she didn't even scream. Rod Taylor, who played the role of Mitch Brenner, was a great actor. He seemed real and Believable. He showed emotion in every scene, and his overall performance was pleasant. Jessica Tandy is great in all the films she is in, and this one was no exception. As Lydia Brenner, she did a great job of acting rude and mean to Melanie Daniels through out the whole movie. I was, however, very annoyed with the young actress that played Cathy Brenner. She was a horrible actress with over-elaborate emotional breakouts, and when she cried after she was attacked, it was so annoying, I thought my ears were bleeding. The ending to the film was very bland. There should have been more closure to the whole situation instead of just making you wonder what happened to them. The Birds is nothing like modern day horror films. It takes a more believeable line to horror than most modern day films. Modern horror consists mostly of the supernatural or total carnage. Although I would still put The Birds into a category with any modern day horror flicks, I still believe that it is definitely classic horror.

    4-0 out of 5 stars A nightmare comes to life - thanks to Hitchcock!
    Although Alfred Hitchcock is widely regarded as the greatest director of suspense and "thriller" movies in Hollywood's long history, in his direction of "The Birds" (1963), he outdoes himself. Even more than "Psycho", which started the modern "slice-and-dice" genre of horror movies, "The Birds" is a truly disturbing and surreal experience - a nightmare which comes to life on film. In my opinion "The Birds" is unlike any other Hitchcock film - it actually comes closer to movies such as "The Sixth Sense" or even "The Matrix" in the way it takes the "real world" we are all familiar and comfortable with and turns it into something that will cause you to lose sleep at night. The film's plot is deceptively simple: Melanie Daniels (Tippi Hedren), a rich and rather spoiled young woman, meets Mitch Brenner (Rod Taylor), a handsome and rather mysterious man, in a pet store in San Francisco. She is intrigued enough to follow him to his home in Bodega Bay, a charming but isolated small fishing town on the northern California coast. There she meets the local schoolteacher, Annie Hayworth (Suzanne Pleshette), who once had a brief affair with Mitch. Annie takes an immediate dislike to Melanie and her interest in Annie's old boyfriend. Eventually Melanie meets Mitch's mother (Jessica Tandy), a high-strung and suspicious woman who leans upon her son for emotional support and stability. However, this soap-opera style plotline is simply the background for the REAL story in the movie: as the film progresses the birds in Bodega Bay and the surrounding countryside begin to act strangely - they suddenly attack humans for no apparent reason, and start gathering in large and ominous groups on power lines and rooftops. Eventually the birds become murderous - they kill a local farmer by crashing through his bedroom window and hacking out his eyes. Then they attack the schoolchildren and the townspeople in yet another of Hitchcock's famous film sequences. As the frightened and baffled townsfolk are hemmed into their homes and stores like "birds in a cage", they blame Melanie for bringing this terror into their once-peaceful little town. The film's famous climax occurs at the home of Mitch and his mother, as a massive flock of birds attacks the home at night and tries to get inside to kill our heroes. To make this film even more disturbing and bizzare, Hitchcock decided not to have a musical score, and there is no music whatsoever - only the terrifying screeching of the birds as they attack. What makes this film work is how Hitchcock deftly takes "everyday", normal things - such as sitting on a park bench and smoking a cigarette, and turns it into something bizarre, surreal, and truly frightening. Although some critics have refused to label this film as one of Hitchcock's best, it does rank as one of the scariest thrillers of all time. Beware of "The Birds"! (But you'll love the movie).

    5-0 out of 5 stars Beware THE BIRDS!!!
    The Birds is one of my favorite Alfred Hitchcock films. Perhaps that has a lot to do with the beautiful Tippi Hedren, who shines in everything she does. The gorgeous scenery, adorable costumes, and lavish colors also add to the surreal atmosphere, which quickly gets disrupted by a flock of killer birds. Like many firsts Hitchcock introduced with his films, this is the first "nature run amock" film, just like Psycho was the first "slasher" film. This Psycho follow-up was yet another ground-breaking addition to the horror genre and further revealed the master director's darker obsessions.

    Like Hitchcock's fabulous Rebecca and mediocre Jamaica Inn, this is based on a story by the extremely talented Daphne Du Maurier, but Hitchcock was left with the task of fleshing out the short story into a feature film. He did one hell of a job. Hitchcock and screenwriter Evan Hunter borrowed only the title and basic conceit of Daphne du Maurier's 1952 short story, "The Birds." Du Maurier's tale, conventional and utterly humorless, is a Cold War parable that uses the unexplained bird attacks as an apocalyptic metaphor for nature thrown out of balance by technology and warfare. It's told from the perspective of Nat Hocken, a disabled war veteran and farmhand living in a cottage with his family in the British Isles.

    The film version is set in Bodega Bay and follows bored, spoiled socialite Melanie Daniels (Hedren) as she romantically pursues dashing lawyer Mitch Brenner (Rod Taylor). Tension soon develops among Melanie, schoolteacher Annie Hayworth, Mitch's former flame (Suzanne Pleshette), and Mitch's domineering mother (Jessica Tandy). The emotional interplay is interrupted (and reflected) by the sudden and unexplained attack of thousands of birds on the area.

    Hailed as one of Hitchcock's masterpieces by some and despised by others, THE BIRDS is certainly among the director's more complex and fascinating works. Volumes have been written about the film, with each writer picking it apart scene by scene in order to prove his or her particular critical theory--mostly of the psychoanalytic variety. Be that as it may, even those who grow impatient with the slow build-up or occasional dramatic lapses cannot deny the terrifying power of many of the film's haunting images: the bird point-of-view shot of Bodega Bay, the birds slowly gathering on the playground monkey bars, the attack on the children's birthday party, Melanie trapped in the attic, and the final ambiguous shot of the defeated humans leaving Bodega Bay while the thousands of triumphant birds gathered on the ground watch them go.

    Eerie, scary, and suspenseful, this is a great film and classic Hitchcock, which highlights his genius. There is no sound track to cue the audience in as to when to be scared. And what other filmmaker could take the simple sound of wings fluttering in a house and turn it into the sheer sound of terror?

    5-0 out of 5 stars Hitchcook can make anything scary.
    Hitchcook can make anything scary, and this movie is profff, I don't no how fake birds can be scary but they are, in this film anyway.

    It all starts with an opener that's more like 2 people trying to play a joke on eatchother, and ends with a tailhanger ending, paked with scares and creeps this is a must see.

    4-0 out of 5 stars Tense thriller is a winner
    This eerie Hitchcock thriller doesn't have a shower scene but is has its fair share of suspense, dread and anticipation as to when the birds will attack. Filmed in color and without the accompaniment of music, the movie builds steadily towards tense and dangerous moments when hundreds of blackbirds swoop down on the human populace and scratch, peck and claw them to shreds without rhyme or reason. Even a lone seagull gets in its licks on Melanie Daniels who has followed Mitch Brenner to Bodega Bay to close in on the handsome fellow. The film has several attacks in which adults and school children are ravaged, and the air assaults are frightening to watch. The dangerous birds' unexplained sheer destructive force is displayed in the attack in a bedroom where the unfortunate Ms. Daniels is trapped, and their determination to destroy every human in their path is awful to behold. The movie's special effects are first-rate, and the gloomy, overcast skies of the Northern California coast add to the depressed mood of the film. The characters all seemed detached and distant from each other and although Ms. Daniels tries very hard to connect with Mr. Brenner, the romance angle is never developed. ... Read more


    10. Night of the Twisters
    Director: Timothy Bond
    list price: $7.95
    our price: $7.95
    (price subject to change: see help)
    Asin: 6304097808
    Catlog: Video
    Sales Rank: 1245
    Average Customer Review: 4.29 out of 5 stars
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    Reviews (17)

    5-0 out of 5 stars I personanlly think it's better Than Twister!
    Night of the Twisters a made for cable movie is a great movie and in my personal opinion it is better than Twister which was shown in movie theaters, I just think Night of the Twisters had a better plot and I liked the special effects better too and I really like all the actors but especially John Schneider. I haven't read the book that this movie was based on and I really didn't even know there was a book and all I know is that I just really liked the movie and I recommend it and I wish it would be put on DVD.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Brilliant!
    Night of the Twisters is one of the best films I've ever seen. The performance from the lovely Devon Sawa (Dan Hatch) is fantastic. My dad's not really one to actually sit and watch any film all the way through, but he did with this film which made my day! It's basically about a boy called Dan and his best friend Arthur (Amos Crawley) who get trapped inside Dan's house during a horrific tornado storm, and have to get Dan's baby brother and themselves to the safety of the basement. After the twister's over, Dan and Arthur set out on a journey to find Arthur's sisters and Dan's step-father, Jack (John Schneider), grandma and mother, and try and all get to the safety of a medical centre in the town before they get hit by another twister. If you can't buy this film, then I recommend you rent it a few times, cos this is one film with indredible effects which are worth seeing!

    5-0 out of 5 stars The night of the fricken Twisters
    The movie is awesome. I really enjoyed the ending where the family is in there 1980 dodge minivan and they are driving 200mph and just happen to always stay right ahead of the tornadoes.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Good!
    The night of the twisters is a very good movie, even for all ages. My mom and dad liked it, my kids liked it and, my wife and I liked it. It has many turns and twists, and is unperdictable like a tornado. This movie has plenty of suspence and has tons of action. This was a remarkable movie and that's why I give it 5 stars.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Good...Very Good.
    We watched this movie on TV one night when we couldn't find any thing else we wanted to watch so when someone changed the channels and came across Night of the Twisters I was at first reluctant to watch it because we had rented the theatrically released Twister when it came out on video and I just didn't like that movie at all and thought all the hype was not worth it and it just wasn't what it was all cracked up to be. I enjoyed Night of The Twisters though and thought it was way better, the special effects are just as good if even better and I have to agree that the story and dialogue are better in Night of the Twisters. I got this movie on video a few years and it is a used copy and a little worn out so I definitely have to agree that the movie would be best on DVD and I would very gladly replace my video with a sturdier DVD that will last longer and won't wear out as easily as a tape. Plus I just really recommend this movie, I like disater movies and Night of the Twisters is one of my favorites along with The Poseidon Adventure, The Towering Inferno and Earthquake. ... Read more


    11. Madame X
    Director: David Lowell Rich
    list price: $14.98
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    Asin: 6300183920
    Catlog: Video
    Sales Rank: 864
    Average Customer Review: 4.82 out of 5 stars
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    Reviews (17)

    2-0 out of 5 stars More Than A Few Holes
    Lana Turner stars as a woman who marries above herself into a powerful family, earning the dislike of her mother-in-law. When she becomes involved with a notorious playboy who dies accidentally, her mother-in-law uses it as an excuse to get rid of her, forcing her to leave the family and her child, assuming a different identity. Her life spirals downward out of control, until she ends up in jail, charged with murder and being defended by her now grown-up son. There are a lot of holes in this story which relies far too much on coincidence and the stupidity of its characters to advance the plot. Turner is the standout of the film, shedding her typical glamour as the character falls apart. She makes the most out of the role as its written. The supporting cast are given two-dimensional characters to impersonate. John Forsythe barely registers a performance, while the great Constance Bennett barks out her nasty character. The music telegraphs all the emotions at the start of every scene. I'm not a fan of soap opera, but I can watch it if it's handled with a subtle touch. Subtle wouldn't be the word for this movie. Think "heavy-handed and plastic".

    5-0 out of 5 stars Triumph to Tragedy
    There has never been, and will never be, a film that better depicts life's happiest and saddest events. The movie opens with ex-salesgirl, newlywed Holly Anderson (Lana Turner) being welcome to the Anderson mansion and meeting her live-in mother-in-law. Her husband, Clay Anderson (John Forsythe), is a rich, politician-on-the-rise. They live the life of the socially prominent, always mindful of their public images. Soon, an heir is born and Holly is a perfect mother. But to be successful, Clay must, and does, travel extensively. Lonely and bored, Holly succumbs to friends' urgings and fullfills her social obligations on the arm of a single, male friend. This causes a series of tragedies, culminating in a surprise twist, and an ending that only a rock could get through without crying. In her role as Holly Anderson, Lana Turner exposes the depths of a woman's soul and the expesses the breadth of a woman's love. If I could, I would give this movie ten stars.

    5-0 out of 5 stars soapy but riveting
    Lana Turner is terrific as the pawn of destiny in this elaborate soap opera; it's a plot that could fill five seasons of daytime drama, all wrapped up in one improbable but incredibly entertaining film. It isn't Shakespeare, but for suds, it's tops.
    Turner plays Holly Parker, the "little shop girl from San Francisco" who marries a man of immense wealth and ambition, and as a package deal, along with the mansion in Connecticut comes his implacable mother, who has plans for sonny boy, and tells Holly she should have "stayed on the other side of the counter".

    John Forsythe plays Holly's husband Clay Anderson with charm and elegance, and Keir Dullea is their grown son. Ricardo Montalban (who starred with Turner 13 years earlier in the charming comedy "Latin Lovers") is the man who tries to seduce her, and Estelle, the scheming mother, is played to the hilt by Constance Bennett, in what was to be her last film.
    Burgess Meredith does a marvelous turn as a slimy character Holly meets in a Mexican motel, and the way the rooms are decorated in these scenes is priceless; kudos also go to the make-up department in this section of the film, and Ms. Turner's ability to transform herself. This film proves that she was exceedingly underrated as an actress.

    Well paced direction by David Lowell Rich, a lovely score by Frank Skinner, and lavish gowns by Jean Louis make this a memorable melodrama, and save your biggest hanky for the end, which though contrived, is still good for many heartfelt sobs. Total running time is 100 minutes.

    5-0 out of 5 stars This is one of the best movies of all times
    How this video has not made it to DVD is a mystery to me. Lana Turner shines like she never has before in this depiction of Holly Anderson.

    I really hope that the movie distributers will look at this and put it on DVD ; as I know it will sell like hotcakes. I mean look at the VHS price 29.90 and up.!!

    5-0 out of 5 stars Real Classy entertainment
    Excellent drama which should have resulted in Turner winning an Oscar,shame though she didn't. There have been many so called attempts in the last 30 years to make romantic dramas popular again,granted there has been a a few but this version of Madame X is a bone fide tearjerker and first class movie. The VHS copy is very good,and hopefully it will soon get a much deserved DVD release ... Read more


    12. Witness
    Director: Peter Weir
    list price: $9.95
    our price: $9.95
    (price subject to change: see help)
    Asin: 6300214567
    Catlog: Video
    Sales Rank: 1668
    Average Customer Review: 4.42 out of 5 stars
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    Amazon.com essential video

    When Samuel (Lukas Haas), a young Amish boy traveling with his mother Rachel (Kelly McGillis), witnesses the murder of a police officer in a public restroom, he and his mother become the temporary wards of John Book (Harrison Ford), a detective who's been assigned to solve the crime. After suspect lineups and mug-shot books yield nothing, Samuel, in the most memorable scene of the film, recognizes the murderer as a narcotics agent whose picture he sees in the precinct. Once Book realizes that the police chief is in on it, too, he whisks Samuel and Rachel back home to Amish country, where he himself goes into hiding as a plain Amish man. The juxtaposition between the life of the Amish and the violence of inner-city police corruption work surprisingly well for the story, and Kelly McGillis as the falling in love widow gives an almost perfect performance. Directed by Peter Weir, the film is extremely successful in drawing the viewer into its world and, accordingly, is immensely entertaining. The only thing that mars its polish is the one-dimensional, almost cartoonish handling of the upper-echelon police corruption--a subtler, more realistic treatment of this aspect of the story would have rendered the film near perfect. --James McGrath ... Read more

    Reviews (62)

    5-0 out of 5 stars An extraordinarily good film ...
    At the end of a disappointing summer movie season, I've started watching some of my favorites on tape. This movie is near the top of my all-time list; here's why:

    ACTORS -- Most of the actors gave career-high performances in this movie. "Witness" helped establish Harrison Ford as a serious (i.e., non-Star Wars) action hero, and he demonstrates emotional range in this movie that doesn't show up very often in more recent films. Kelly McGillis is compelling, gradually and believably transforming from a shy widow out of her element to a strong, spirited member of her Amish community. Lukas Haas, who plays her son, offers a level of child acting that has only recently been matched by Haley Joel Osment. As other reviewers have noted, his wordless scene with Ford in the police station is a brilliant piece of acting -- an enormous amount of information and emotion is conveyed in complete silence. And Alexander Godunov brings a gentle grace to his role as the Amish farmer competing with Ford for McGillis' affections. It's sad that he didn't get more opportunities to demonstrate his acting ability before his death a few years later.

    CINEMATOGRAPHY/SCORE -- As with most of Peter Weir's films (cf. "Dead Poet's Society"), "Witness" is visually stunning. The shift from the gritty heart of Philadelphia to the rolling hills of Amish country is jarring, and leaves one with a palpable sense of longing. I think the barn-raising scene in the middle of the movie is one of the most beautiful scenes I've ever seen filmed, both visually and thematically. Underscored (so to speak) with music reminiscent of Copland's "Appalachian Spring," it drives home the value of community and shared endeavor. It's a marvelously uplifting segment.

    ROMANCE/EROTICISM -- The relationship between Ford and McGillis is very well done. The attraction that arises between them (driven in no small part, apparently, by Ford's kindness to the young boy) is constantly and realistically tempered by the awareness that they come from fundamentally different cultures. That slows the development of a relationship between them, which provides the movie with a delightful undercurrent of romantic tension. That tension reaches a peak in a powerful scene in which Ford sees McGillis giving herself a sponge bath. There is nudity in this scene (McGillis turns and shows herself, topless, to Ford), but it seems to be precisely the kind of nudity that, as actresses like to say, "is essential to the story." Given the way in which the Amish are portrayed in this film, McGillis' character is making a very bold (and risky) offer, and the difficulty of Ford's refusal is evident in his face. There certainly is a lot of gratuitous nudity in film, but "Witness" is not in that category.

    This movie is aging extremely well, in large part because of the sweep of its vision, the powerful simplicity of its story, and the skill of its execution. It is a terrific movie.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Impressive film!
    "Witness" is defineately one of the greatest thriller/romance movies ever made. Directed by Peter Weir, the plot concerns a yuong Amish boy (Lukas Haas) who witnesses a murder in a Philadelphia train station bathroom while traveling to the city with his mother Rachel (Kelly McGillis in her best performance). Detective John Book (Harrison Ford) is assigned to the case, and quickly discovers that a corrupt narcotics cop (Danny Glover) is the killer. After a close shave, Book, Rachel, and her son escape to Amish country, where Book hides out as an Amish farmer--while also protecting the witness and his mother.
    Of course, at the end there is one whopper of a scene when the corrupt cop & friends discover Book's safehouse.
    "Witness" received several Academy Award nominations including Best Picture, and won for Screenplay, Cinematography, Sound, and Film Editing.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Ford at the top of his game
    Some of the most powerful romances can spring up when both sides have to be restrained; here, the widowed Amish woman and the cop-in-hiding know that they come from different worlds, know that a relationship between them will not practically work, and so fill the screen with unresolved sexual and romantic tension.

    Woven into the more grisly details of murder and police corruption are scenes of humor and beauty. Dancing in the barn to "Don't Know Much About History". Having to wake up at 4 a.m. to milk the cows. It's funny to see how the cop, John Book, tries to fit himself into Amish life the best he can. And it's very moving to see his growing love for the Amish woman who nursed him through a bad gunshot wound and has enchanted him with her character and beauty. The movie's climax is also riveting; it's not often that one sees gunfighting at an Amish farm.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Great film, poor quality transfer
    "Witness" captures director Peter Weir's first exploration of the cultural clash between America's Amish community and modern society. We witness two worlds that collide and two people that can't bridge the gap between their two worlds despite their blossoming love for each other.

    The story revolves around Samuel a little boy who has witnessed the murder of an undercover police officer, his mother Rachel (McGillis)and John Book (Ford) who investigates the murder discovering corruption, deceit and a conspiracy at it the heart of his department. After he discovers that his witness isn't safe, Book whisks them back to their Amish farm where he's forced to hideout as well.

    One of Weir's finest films to focus on America, this so-so transfer looks grainy and has lots of compression issues. The transfer isn't a widescreen anamorphic transfer but is presented in that format (i.e., it's presented with the black bars at the top and bottom of the screen but the transfer isn't high definition). The picture occasionally comes across as soft and the rich use of color and light that vividly brought the film to life in theaters isn't well represented here. Hopefully Paramount will update this and remaster it the way it deserves to be done.

    The extras include an interview with Weir obviously done around the time the film was made or first appeared on video and the original theatrical trailer. I would have expected a commentary track but since Weir isn't all that big on them to begin with, that would be hoping for too much.

    A great film just a poor translation to DVD.

    3-0 out of 5 stars Comparing Witness: 1985 and 2004
    As I write my title, it is weird to think this film is nearly 20 years old! How time flies! Anyway...I first saw this film when it first came out and I remember I really really liked it. I was 23 years old and not a Christian at that time. Now, I am soon to be 42 and have been a Christian for over 18 years. For 10 years of my life, I lived as a Mennonite (like Amish in many ways, but we drove cars, had electricity, etc.) I am no longer a Mennonite, and now I watch films again. I appreciate classic cinema very much, but recently have wanted to watch Witness again, to see if I would like it as much as the first time, and to see if I thought they portrayed the Amish correctly.

    So, I watched it last night. It was interesting in that I remembered so much, even some small details about it. So it really did impress me that first time when I was young. This time, I enjoyed it, but I wouldn't say it is a film I would watch over and over again, as I watch some classic films. To see it once more was enough to just satisfy my curiosity about my memories of it.

    I did feel they portrayed the Amish quite well, with the clothes and such. What they did wrong about the portrayal was that in no way would it be allowed for an Amish woman to tend to a wounded man who wasn't her husband, by herself in a room alone with him. It just isn't proper, isn't done. In reality, a man would have done that, or an older woman would have done it, with another woman there. I think the movie allowed the Rachel character to have way more "access" to a man alone than would be allowed in a real Amish or Mennonite community. I doubt he would have really been allowed to stay in the house. In reality he would have been placed in a home with a family who had a bunch of boys and he would work with them and the father, and not have all that time alone with Rachel.

    I don't like violence...I knew that the bad part happened in the train station in the beginning, so we were able to fast forward that part. Also, we were able to fast forward the ending "shoot out" stuff. I didn't care for the bad language. The scene with Rachel taking her sponge bath, well when I was young and not a Christian, I found that very romantic. Now, I found it rather silly. A devout Amish girl/woman would not have just calmly turned around and let a man stare at her while unclothed. And later on, when she and he finally "meet" for the romantic moment, I found that sort of offensive. Why kiss out in the yard where anyone could see you? Eli could have easily looked out the window (a real Amish father would have kept better tabs on his daughter with a strange man around the place). I felt that scene was very much just an animal passion thing...sort of vulgar. Not at all romantic, truly loving or gentle. It seems people sure knew how to kiss and show romantic love a lot better in the old movies! And right before she went out there, she took her prayer veiling off. Which again, no Amish woman would do. But then she obviously was rebelling. There was that other time too, when she and John Book were in the barn listening to his radio, and she had it off then, and I am not sure why, for no Amish or Mennonite woman will go without it in front of people or outside the house.

    The ending left me wondering...would Rachel just go ahead and marry Daniel? Would she really be happy with him? She really would have to repent of her sins with John Book to be truly happy. I also noticed that the film never showed a church service. Also, none of the Amish folks never seemed to care to tell John Book how to be a Christian. But then there are many Amish who are not born- again Christians, but just are "culturally Amish"...they live the way they do because they have always done so. These must have been that type of Amish. It did seem that Grandfather knew the Bible...he quoted some good verses when talking to the boy about the gun. That was good to see, yet sad that such violence had to even be witnessed by this child.

    Oh, of course any film with Amish must have a barn raising scene, and this one did. Also, so many movies with cows mus have the scene where the city person doesn't know how to milk a cow. Of course John Book must learn. He makes a joke about "teats" in this scene, and grandfather Eli laughs at it, which again, I doubt a devout Amish man would do.

    Well, these are my thoughts. It was interesting to revisit this film again. In closing, I would say it is an okay film for adults but I would not recommend it for children. ... Read more


    13. The Sting
    Director: George Roy Hill
    list price: $9.98
    our price: $9.98
    (price subject to change: see help)
    Asin: 0783229100
    Catlog: Video
    Sales Rank: 1473
    Average Customer Review: 3.44 out of 5 stars
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    Reviews (119)

    5-0 out of 5 stars An great comedy thriller classic.
    When an ambitious Small Time Crook (Two Time Oscar-Winner:Robert Redford) steals $10,000 with his old age partner from an dangerous criminal (Robert Shaw), later on that day, The Crook discover his crime partner has been murder by the crime lord. Then The Crook meets his dead friend ex-partner a Veteran Con-Man (Three Time Oscar-Winner:Paul Newman), who seek revenge on the crime lord.

    Entertaining comedy is directed by George Roy Hill (Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid, Slap Shot) and Written by David S. Ward (The Program). Winner of Seven Academy Awards for Best Picture, Best Director, Best Art Direction/Set Decoration, Best Costume Design, Best Film Editing, Best Score and Best Original Screenplay. The Film recieve Three Oscar Nominations, Including:Best Actor:-Robert Redford, Best Cinematography and Best Sound. The Sting has the Greatest Double Crossing in a Movie History, Complete with an Surprise Ending. Great Fun. Better to Wait for the Special Edition DVD in a Widescreen Version, which it will be 30 Years, Next Year. Grade:A.

    5-0 out of 5 stars The Quintessential Caper Flick
    "The Sting" is an extremely well written story by David Ward ("Major League", "Sleepless in Seattle") and David Maurer about some smalltime grifters who attempt to swindle a mob boss. The film was nominated for ten Academy Awards in 1974 and won seven Oscars including Best Picture and Best Director. It reunited director George Roy Hill, Robert Redford and Paul Newman four years after their blockbuster, "Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid". Strangely, although Butch and Sundance made it to number 50 on AFI's top 100 of the century, this film did not make that list. This is even more surprising since "Butch" did not win the Oscar for Best Picture in 1970 ("Midnight Cowboy" won it that year).

    While I think "Butch" is funnier and more exciting, this film is more intriguing with interesting character studies and some unpredictable plot twists. Hill does a superb job of weaving the elements of the caper together and giving it a depression era feeling. The humor is more ironic than hilarious, but it fits the story well. The period props, locations, and sets are excellent, and the costumes are perfect. The costumes were done by the legendary Edith Head, who designed costumes for over 400 films in her 50-year career. She won an Oscar for best Costume Design for this film, which was one of eight she won in that category in a career marked by an astounding 34 Oscar nominations. The music by Scott Joplin and Marvin Hamlisch is also fabulous, bestowing an early twentieth century flavor on the film, and giving Hamlisch one of three Oscars he won that year (the other two were for "The Way We Were" also starring Redford).

    Where "Butch" was probably a little more Newman's film, this film clearly belonged to Redford. Redford, who was nominated for best actor for the role, is marvelous in the lead, giving his character a charming, lighthearted personality to go along with his scheming intellect. Newman plays almost a supporting role as the veteran conman Henry Gondorff, who assembles the team for the caper and oversees its execution. Despite the smaller part, Newman gives an electrifying performance with his conniving tough guy portrayal. Robert Shaw ("From Russia With Love", "A Man For All Seasons", "Jaws") is also terrific as mob boss Doyle Lonnegan. Charles Durning ("The Best Little Whorehouse in Texas"), Ray Walston (TV's "My Favorite Martian") and Eileen Brennan ("Private Benjamin") round out a splendid supporting cast with fantastic character portrayals.

    This film is entertaining and fun with a tight plot and wonderful period renderings. I rated it a 10/10. If you have never seen it, you are in for a treat.

    2-0 out of 5 stars THIS ONE REALLY STINGS!
    "The Sting" is a classic throwback to Hollywood's golden age: a fish out of water tale about a couple of con artists (Paul Newman and Robert Redford) who seemingly meet their match in a cheating mobster (Robert Shaw). As the police close in from one end and the Mafia from the other, the stakes become higher, the comedy more hilarious and the ultimate con, more rewarding. The supporting cast is a potpourri of stellar characters including Dana Elcar, Eileen Brennan, Ray Walston, Charles Durning, and Harold Gould. Marvin Hamlisch provides a sophisticated score buttressed by Scott Joplin's ragtime jazz.

    It is disheartening to see an Oscar wining Best Picture get so shabby a treatment on DVD. For starters, the film is presented in a full frame, pan and scan version only. The shortcomings of this format are that you are not seeing the film in a version director, George Roy Hill would have approved of. But apart from Universal's glaringly obvious oversight, the print quality of "The Sting" suffers from a poorly balanced color spectrum, age related artifacts, edge enhancement, shimmering of fine details and pixelization. Flesh tones are often weak and pasty. Blacks are rarely solid or deep. Fine grain can be excessive in spots. The audio is poorly mixed, sounding strident and tinny. There are no extra features.

    4-0 out of 5 stars Redford and Newman at it again
    I just rented this DVD and watched the whole thing, but I've seen this movie several times before.

    Johnny Hooker (Robert Redford) is a con artist who unknowingly swindles a lackey of crime boss Doyle Lonnegan (Robert Shaw). After Hooker's partner in the crime is killed, Hooker vows revenge against Lonnegan and seeks Henry Gondorff (Paul Newman), one of the best cons in the game to help in the big Sting. Hooker would love to do more than just hit Lonnegan for a lot of money, but "doesn't know enough about killin' to kill him."

    It's not easy separating a crime boss from his money, especially when he owns half the politicians and police. They have to take him without him even knowing he was taken. What follows is an exciting deception, carried out with professionalism and ingenuity.

    I don't think the chemistry between Newman and Redford is quite as good as Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid, but it's still pretty darn good. Lines like this:

    Redford (first seeing his arch-enemy): "He's not as tough as he thinks."
    Newman: "Neither are we"

    The story is classic. You don't exactly know who's who, and you wonder how they're going to pull it off in the end. Scott Joplin's ragtime music, although somewhat anachronistic, is effective at keeping the movie somewhat lighthearted. There are a couple of instances of swearing and a stripper with pasties on, which gives it a PG rating.

    The reason for four stars is the fact that the DVD has NO EXTRAS, and the only option is the full screen version, no widescreen. A movie as good as this deserves better, which is unfortunate.

    Overall, this is a great movie with great cinematography (transition wipe effects and some tracking shots) and phenomenal acting. Enjoy.

    1-0 out of 5 stars Widescreen?
    I love the film, but why is this not available in Widescreen on DVD? There's been a Widescreen VHS, and I've seen it in Widescreen on Turner Classic Movies. I know it was shot in Widescreen, so how about it, Universal? ... Read more


    14. What Ever Happened to Baby Jane?
    Director: Robert Aldrich
    list price: $14.95
    (price subject to change: see help)
    Asin: 6304359721
    Catlog: Video
    Sales Rank: 2621
    Average Customer Review: 4.67 out of 5 stars
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    Reviews (103)

    5-0 out of 5 stars But you are, Blanche. You ARE in that chair!
    This is one great movie! "What Ever Happened to BabyJane?" is, as stated in Amazon's description, the story of twoaging sisters, each in her own way connected with show business.

    Now the good stuff. The sisters are played by Bette Davis and Joan Crawford (the only time the two ever acted together) to absolute perfection. Crawford is wonderful in the role of crippled sister Blanche, but Miss Davis absolutely walks away with the show as the former "Baby" Jane Hudson. The role is meatly and she revels in it! It is obvious that Miss Davis held the philosophy that, if you are going to go over-the-top, don't apologize. And she doesn't. She goes WAY over-the-top with a gleeful abandon that is infectious.

    The way she taunts her wheelchair-bound sister (the title quotes one of Jane's best lines), serves her meals of dead rodents and ex-pets, kicks her in the gut, mocks her ever-so-proper speech, etc. It's all so delicious. And check out the ballet that she does to one of the songs from her childhood vaudeville act. Bette Davis was obviously having the time of her life, and so do the viewers of this classic.

    For the DVD edition, there are disappointingly few extras, but Davis is credited with developing the absolutely hideous hair and makeup combinations she sports while slouching about the house in her scuffs and house coat (Director Robert Aldrich said that, while he loved the look, he never would have had the nerve to suggest such a thing to Bette Davis).

    Joan Crawford was in fine form, as well. But for Jane to be able to be credible doing the things she did, Blanche had to be the "straight man". Crawford or Aldrich knew this and Blanche behaves accordingly. Consequently, it is Bette Davis' Jane who has the best lines and the showier part in general.

    If you have never seen this movie, get it. If you have, go back and visit the Hudson sisters again. Then you might want to write a letter to YOUR daddy.

    5-0 out of 5 stars A Classic Psychological Thriller - Truly Sick!
    This is the ultimate is psychological thrillers starring two of the greatest "top-billed turned has-been" movie actresses in history.

    Betty Davis as Jane Hudson and real life nemesis Joan Crawford as sister Blanche Hudson make for comic and scary thrills. Quick retread: Jane was "Baby Jane Hudson", a child star who lost her popularity after puberty. Blanche Hudson was jealous as a child but becomes a top rated adult movie actress. Jane, of course, becomes an increasingly insane alcoholic. Trouble ensues when Blanche is mysteriously crippled in a car wreck forcing 'whack-job' case sister Jane to care for her. The plot thickens as quickly as Jane loses her mind. It's hilarious. But the sadistic scenes Jane carries out on Blanche are both scary and hilarious, making this film a true cult classic. The ending is a masterpiece of plot twists!

    I can't get into more details other than to tell you that every time I've shown someone this movie, they goes nuts over it! It's frightening and comedic simultaneously. It's no wonder these two characters have been Halloween favorites for years!

    Quality of 'black & white' is okay and sound is what you would expect from an early 60's nightmare, but it's worth it. Before you pick up your main course covered dinner plate, remember what Jane said to Blanche - "By the way Blanche, did you know we have rats in the cellar?!"

    5-0 out of 5 stars WHO the Hell is Norman?
    Check out the editorial review "Sadistic Jane and their servant Norman????" The only servant, err, make that housekeeper in this saga is ELVIRA [No, NOT THAT one!] who meets ..... [Clunk!~ Thud!]

    WELL, this utterly dark little Gem of Joy still pack many a wallop!

    No quite dated, but such an acidic picture of Tinseltown - as a matter of fact you can still see these old [er] Dolls and Guys on Hollywood Boulevard - or Rodeo Drive [botox-powered] for that matter.

    IT hasn't really aged that badly - Crawford is superb as the wheelchair bound glam queen Blance ~ utterly dependent on her increasingly insane sister Jane ~ Davis probably on a par with her turn in THE STAR. Davis sacrifices all for this role, including figure and looks, shuffling around the house in flip-flops, dragging on a cigarette and swigging booze has NEVER been this fun!

    Bring along a creepy VICTOR BUONO [debut role] as a grifter with an accent and his dear old Ma ... nasty little jewels they are - check out the scene with Davis and Buono and the sandwich plate ... then the booze scene later! Priceless [It's almost Norman Desmond and Joe - the later years].

    Superior lensing and direction etc. etc. etc.

    Davis daughter BD HYMAN plays the teen next door.

    Roaring fun for late at night viewing - double billed with Sunset Boulevard.

    [Now wasn't there a musical version of this one ....?]

    4-0 out of 5 stars Betty Grable and Ginger Rogers
    oh well it could have been betty and ginger
    both blonde both musical stars (grable was more popular)

    5-0 out of 5 stars Ohh.. But Cha AAH, Blanche, Ya AAH In That Chair!!!
    In "What Ever Happened To Baby Jane?" you really DO find out, indeed!

    But what horrors you have to endure to see the truth and consequences! With twists, turns, torture & anti-climactic scenes all played to the hilt by the Miss Hudsons (Bette Davis and Joan Crawford), respectively, you will never be able to look at your pet parakeet the same way again.

    Miss Baby Jane Hudson, played with great, grotesque gusto by Davis who was once the belle of the ball. Kind of a Shirley Temple of her era. Baby Jane was daddy's girl and Jane, therefore, has quite an Electra complex that is and has been exhibited her entire life.

    Her sister, Miss Blanche Hudson, played "aptly and sapply" by Crawford, has a long and lasting career as an adult movie star but is now wheelchair bound because of a little "accident" betwixt the sisters many years back. Jane is the caretaker of Blanche since the "accident" and they both live off of the residuals of Blanche's long and prosperous film career before she became crippled.

    After a local California TV station decides to run summer afternoon, back to back Blanche Hudson films, Baby Jane gets that ol' jealous feeling brewing again and wants desparately to revitalize her childhood career. Baby Jane hires pianist from the classifieds, Mr. Edward Flagg, played in a great understated role by Victor Buono, who has his own Oedipal yearnings and problems. They make a great and perfect pair of drunks and crazies, let me tell ya.

    Jane is certainly unstable and is likened to a gin and vodka guzzling 60 year old broad with a six year old spoiled brat mentality. SCARY combo, right there! Let alone Jane's guilt of the "accident", her shameless jealousy, and her expressions of the antithesis of "SISTERLY LOVE".

    Filmed in glorious black and white, it lends itself to the dark, somber and horrific things that happen to Blanche vis-a-vis Jane...

    "Whatever Happened To Baby Jane?" is a cult classic and a true and genuine classic in it's own right.

    Happy Watching! ... Read more


    15. Fried Green Tomatoes
    Director: Jon Avnet
    list price: $9.98
    our price: $9.98
    (price subject to change: see help)
    Asin: 6302468027
    Catlog: Video
    Sales Rank: 1357
    Average Customer Review: 4.81 out of 5 stars
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    Amazon.com essential video

    Kathy Bates stars as an unhappy wife trying to get her husband's attention in this amusing and moving 1991 screen adaptation of Fannie Flagg's novel Fried Green Tomatoes at the Whistle Stop Cafe. After befriending a lonely old woman (Jessica Tandy), Bates hears the story of a lifelong friendship between two other women (Mary Stuary Masterson and Mary-Louise Parker, seen in flashback) who once ran a cafe in town against many personal odds. The tale inspires Bates to take further command over her life, and there director Jon Avnet (Up Close and Personal), in his first feature, has fun with the film. Bates develops a real attitude toward her thickheaded spouse at home and some uppity girls in a parking lot, but dignity is generally the key to Avnet's approach with the story's crucial relationships. Tandy is a joy and clearly loves the element of mystery attached to her character, and Masterson and Parker are excellent in the historical sequences. --Tom Keogh ... Read more

    Reviews (88)

    5-0 out of 5 stars Fried Green Tomatoes
    Reviewed Date: October 2003
    Studio: Universal Studios
    Genre: Drama
    Exposure: Color
    Running Time: 130 Minutes
    Rating: PG-13
    Release Year: 1991
    Directed By: Jon Aunet

    Starring: Kathy Bates, Mary Stuart Masterson, Mary-Louise Parker, and Jessica Tandy.

    Co-Starring: Gailard Sartain, Stan Shaw, Cicely Tyson, Gary Basaraba, Grace Zabriskie, Richard Riehle, Grayson Fricke, Lashondra Phillips, Enjolik Oree, Nick Searcy, and Ginny Parker.

    If you want to see a good movie for the whole family, "Fried Green Tomatoes" is the movie for you. It shows friendship, compassion, humor, laughter, and real life encounters.

    The setting takes place in the late 1980's and takes you back in time a half century to the town of Whistle Stop, Alabama.

    "Fried Green Tomatoes" is a movie for anyone. It can make the best of us laugh and cry through the entire movie. "Fried Green Tomatoes" is a movie that gives you two different stories within itself. One story takes you back to the 1930's. The other part of the story takes place in the 1980's between Ninny Threadgooda, telling the story of her past to help her new friend Evelyn get her life together.

    The frienships made within the movie show that this woman do hold their friendships in very high regards. The friendship in the 1930's would help both women to get through some really tough times. The friendship in the 1980's between Ninny and Evelyn keep these two ladies on track.

    I give this movie 5 stars because it is a movie for anyone. Also because it shows how good friends will help a loved one in need of there help at a drop of a hat. This movie is just a well rounded movie, filled with emotion.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Better than Steel Magnolias
    Fried Green Tomatoes is two stories in one ---- depressed housewife Kathy Bates befriends an elderly woman (Jessica Tandy) who tells her the story of two best friends (Mary Stuart Masterson and Mary-Louise Parker) who ran a cafe in the 1930s. The tale of the friends depicts domestic violence, pregnancy, childbirth, and two accidents involving trains. But the courage and spirit that the women have, as told by Tandy to Bates, encourages Bates to stop being a victim in her own life, particularly to her all right but insensitive husband.

    The movie does a great job of showing the trials and tribulations of being a woman but how female friendship can conquer all. It is even more riveting to see it set in a time when women -- particularly unmarried women of dubious sexuality --- have to overcome obstacles set by society in general and its views of what a woman's role is. TOWANDA!!!!!

    5-0 out of 5 stars fried green tomatoes, food for the soul
    I have seen this movie probably 20 times in my life and I have to say it is definetly a personal favorite in my collection. This movie touches on so many emotions that it will have you angry, sad, touched, uplifted, empowered and roaring with laughter. This movie is told to a fed-up repressed housewife (kathy bates) by a sweet ,lonely ,vivacious old woman (ninny) during visits to a nursing home after a chance meeting. The intertwined story is about Idgy a Tom-boy who distances herself with the world due to a tragedy at a young age. As Idgy ages the only person she is close with is her "hired hand" Big George and his mother Sipsy. Idgy's mother becomes concerned with Idgy and decides to have Ruth ( a girl from idgy's past) come and stay with them to try to reach Idgy. At first Idgy is stand offish but soon they become best friends that is, until Ruth leaves because she marries. I dont' want to "spoil" the rest of the story so I'll leave that alone for the time being. As Ninny tells Mrs. Couch (kathy bates) they become close friends and Mrs. Couch begins to become empowered by the strong women in the stories and making some changes in her own life. It touches on tough topics such as racism, spousal abuse, death, tragedy, loneliness, fear of death, and fear of life for some. This dvd is a must watch and own for your dvd collection.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Great Southern Storytelling on the Screen
    I'm always surprised how badly great storytelling makes it to the screen. Particularly, great Southern stories, which tend to make it to the big screen replete with caricatures and stereotypes. I recall, with particular sadness, the movie adaptation of Midnight in the Garden of Good and Evil. While this adaptation to the screen of Flagg's tremendously moving novel does have its share of simple, stereotypical southern "archetypes", these are largely drawn from Flagg's book, and are largely essential to the story. It is, without a doubt, one of the most enjoyable movies I have ever seen and, ten years after first seeing it, it still brings raucous laughter and tears to my eyes. It's the classic "story within the story", and begins with the introduction of a tenacious elderly widow to a repressed younger southern housewife in a nursing home in rural Alabama. What starts off to the housewife as polite and indulgent small talk of past acquaintances with a likely senile elderly woman turns rapidly into an engrossing story with what must be the best "hook line" in storytelling ("Why anybody would have thought she killed that man is beyond me!"). This story then becomes a parable which the housewife uses to change her life for the better.

    While certainly a moral parable of the greater value systems of past times, and of loyalty and courage in the face of bigotry and oppression, the story never loses its infectious humor, despite some genuinely tragic events. The lesbian theme of the book is only mildly hinted at, and one would almost overlook it were one not to deliberately search for it. Some of the more brutal aspects of the book are retained, with the rampant racism and wife-abuse still harrowingly reflected, if toned down. Consequently, younger viewers may best appreciate the film in the company of an adult. Regardless, this is one of the best "feeling good" movies I have ever seen, and being a Southerner from an area very near that depicted in the book, makes me pine for the South in profound ways. It's a film about empowerment and, more importantly, the empowerment one gains through friends, and through standing up for one's friends, and through an unshakable belief in self-respect.

    No little credit for the success of the film goes to the incredibly strong performances of Masterson as the tom-boyish Idgie Threadgood, and Marie Louise-Parker as Ruth Jamison, along with the underrated performance of Stan Shaw, one of TV's great character actors, as Big George. However, the film's strongest performances come from three grande dames of the screen (and stage): Cicely Tyson, as Sissy, Jessica Tandy, as Ninny Threadgood, and Kathy Bates, as Evelyn Couch. While Tandy and Bates have received their due, Tyson's performance, as always, is often overlooked.

    5-0 out of 5 stars To Wander!!!!
    A story of friendship and love, and how they can both intertwin. Mary Stuart Masterson (Somekind of wonderful) and Mary louise-Parker (Boy's on the side) Displaying fabulous performance's along with Jessica Tandy (Driving miss Daisy) and Cathy Bates (Misery). The whole story surrounding a relationship that can not be defined. My Favourite film ever! However i think some people are wrong with one aspect surrounding Ninny and Idgie. That they are one and the same! Best Quote- " Face it girl's.... I'm older and have more insurance"
    A film for any Mary Stuart masterson Fan. ... Read more


    16. Duel
    Director: Steven Spielberg
    list price: $9.98
    our price: $9.98
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    Asin: 6300181987
    Catlog: Video
    Sales Rank: 2755
    Average Customer Review: 4.55 out of 5 stars
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    Amazon.com essential video

    This is the TV movie that put Steven Spielberg on the map, shortly before he made The Sugarland Express. Working from a script by Richard Matheson, the film stars Dennis Weaver as a mild-mannered traveling salesman who unintentionally angers the driver of a semi truck. Suddenly, the truck is not only riding his tail but trying to run him off the road. No matter what he does (pulling over, stopping at a diner, calling the cops), he can't get rid of it. Spielberg makes the wise decision of never showing the driver, even as he cranks the voltage on the film's suspense elements. As a result, the truck itself takes on an air of satanic menace--even a personality of sorts--as it seems to hunt its human prey. Spielberg made a lot out of a little, suggesting just how skilled a storyteller he would become. --Marshall Fine ... Read more

    Reviews (110)

    5-0 out of 5 stars High-octane suspense
    Traveling businessman David Mann (Dennis Weaver) encounters an enormous, rusty, slow-moving tanker truck on a lonely stretch of desert highway, and passes it. The never-seen truck driver, who is obviously "a few gallons short of a full tank," responds by turning his truck into a terrifying murder weapon, trying to run Mann's tiny Plymouth Valiant off the road. That's the entire plot of "Duel." In the hands of a young director named Steven Spielberg, it's all the plot that's needed.

    Spielberg got the green light to direct this made-for-TV movie because producer George Eckstein had seen and been impressed by Spielberg's directorial debut, the pilot episode of "Columbo." Working on a shoestring budget, Spielberg delivered a tale of suspense that puts many a big-budget Hollywood action thriller to shame. Equal credit has to go to Weaver, who superbly conveys David Mann's emotions to the viewer: His initial frustration when the truck passes him and slows to a crawl, his satisfaction when he thinks he's gotten the upper hand, his terror when he realizes the truck driver's intentions have turned deadly, his isolated helplessness as every person he encounters thinks he's crazy and/or refuses to get involved and, ultimately, his determination to survive his ordeal.

    There is a great moment in this movie which no one else has mentioned: Mann, thinking his ordeal is over, is flagged down by a bus driver whose bus has broken down. While assisting the driver, Mann suddenly notices the truck, waiting in the shadows under an overpass. Then, the truck's headlights come on. At this moment, the truck resembles a yellow-eyed demonic apparition straight out of David Mann's worst nightmare.

    Far less impressive is this film's monaural sound, although it does have its moments. This is a made-for-television feature film from 1971, so don't expect the aural impact of a modern-day surround-sound blockbuster. Anyway, the chances are good that you'll be so caught up in the movie itself, the (relatively) poor sound quality won't matter.

    But be warned: When you're out on the road, and you look in your rear-view mirror and see a large truck closing in behind you, this movie WILL come back to you.

    5-0 out of 5 stars 1971 classic
    this movie is both funny and thrilling at the same time. I always laugh everytime I watch this movie even the part when dennis weaver turns his radio back on and that early 70s funky country music starts playing. I think they should put this on dvd I bought jaws on dvd and on the directors comentary steven spielberg said that jaws was the sequel to duel but on water the elements are simliar.anyway duel is about a nerdy salesman david mann (dennis weaver) who is traveling across the state to a meeting driving in a new at the time plymouth valiant (NOT A DODGE DART)!!when all of the sudden he gets behind this oily old peterbilt tanker truck that looks like it hasn't been washed in about a year. so mann tries to pass the truck couple of times and the driver of the truck goes nuts and passes although it seems like a silly little game at first but soon it worsens the trucker who you never see tries to kill david mann or run off the road and through the movie its pretty much that but there are other elements through the movie that is funny so do yourself a faver and get this movie on vhs. PS you do catch glimpse of the driver of the truck watch closely as mann tries to pass the truck the second time look closely in the the cab you'll see him!!!

    5-0 out of 5 stars "Duel" Of The Fates
    "Come on you miserable fat-head! Get that fat-*ss truck outta my way!" - David Mann gets his road-rage face on & starts "Duel"

    Before the term "road-rage" was coined there was Steven Spielberg's first film. "Duel" still holds its punch 33 years after its movie of the week debut.

    David Mann is a simple business man, late for a convention thats taking him cross country to get there. It seems that he's making good time, that is, until, an old tanker truck gets in his path, and won't let Mann pass at any cost, except, with the cost of his own life. But, when Mann sees an opening and slips past the truck, an annoying situation escalates into a dangerous game of cat & mouse as the truck and its unknown driver hunts down, teases, & taunts Mann, & his crappy Dodge Dart, all over the Arizona highway.

    The film is still great. Its like a feature length episode of "The Twilight Zone". Dennis Weaver is at his best as David Mann, who seems confindent, one of the guys that seems to have an infinite amount of patience, at the films beginning, but, at films end he's a nerve-shattered shell of his formerself & you wonder if he would ever drive a vehicle again, let alone sit in one!

    Spielberg shows his first flair for suspense in "Duel" with the school bus sequence and the gas station attack (if you weren't at least on the edge of your seat when Mann was trying to help the kids & the school bus out while the truck ominously watched in the wings, you better check your pulse!).

    "Duel" is one of those films that makes you think twice about showing off your road-rage & flipping someone off after they cut you off on the highway. A must for the DVD collection. Not to be watched on long road trips.

    5-0 out of 5 stars THE CRAZY TRUCK
    I LIKE THIS MOVIE ALOT ITS ABOUT A MAN ON THE ROAD AND THIS TRUCK WONTS TO KILL HIM FOR NO RESON AT ALL I DON'T KOWN WHY I THINK THE TUCK DRIVER NEEDS HELP OR SOMETHING I THINK HES CRAZY THSAT WOULD BE SCARY TO BE DRIVING ON THE ROAD BEING CHEST BY A HUGE TRUCK.....

    5-0 out of 5 stars One of the first of its genre--and possibly the best
    Reviewers highlight the wonderful qualities of this must-see movie, but to me one of the most praiseworthy is that it is a pioneer--that other films since "Duel" are imitations of its suspense and edge-of-insanity horror. Spielberg, in his first try, gave cinema the prototype of an everyday situation that becomes a nightmare.
    He and Dennis Weaver made small moments perfect. The truck's death, like a great dinosaur, with Weaver capering like a Stone Age warrior celebrating his kill, then sitting exhausted and sober, throwing pebbles at the carcass. It is my favorite part. ... Read more


    17. Play Time
    Director: Dale Trevillion
    list price: $9.95
    our price: $9.95
    (price subject to change: see help)
    Asin: 6305500193
    Catlog: Video
    Sales Rank: 7250
    Average Customer Review: 4.47 out of 5 stars
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    Reviews (15)

    4-0 out of 5 stars Hot sexual fantasy
    There are only two reasons to watch this movie. The most compelling one for me is the explicit sex scenes between Jennifer Burton and Monique Parent. The other reason is to laugh at the dialogue. Don't bother with the edited version -- it's heavy on the implausible story and cuts the best sex.

    Monique Parent seems to get most of the attention on the Internet, but Jennifer Burton is hotter and a better actress in this movie. She seems to drive what story there is.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Monique and Jennifer SIZZLE
    I've become a big fan of Monique Parent -- mostly due to this movie which I consider to be a classic in erotica. The premise is not only interesting, but highly charged. Jennifer Burton relishes her role and essentially makes this film one of the best in its genre. A MUST see!

    4-0 out of 5 stars Energetic semiconductors transmit phermones!
    The continuous endeavor to reduce the geometry of semiconductor devices and eliminate defects requires not only ultra pure chemicals but ultra pure water (UPW) as well.  The water quality depends on how thoroughly the ion-exchange resin beds used in the production of UPW remove unwanted contaminants.  Boron is currently being used as the indicator of the need to regenerate the ion-exchange resin beds as it elutes before silica.  Previously at AMD, a quadrapole ICP-MS used for the analysis did not provide the sensitivity required to generate data needed to track low-level boron.  Most of the data had been reported as "less than detection" which ranged from 80ppt to 160ppt.  This made it difficult to determine when the resin beds were near depletion.

    With the Finnigan Element 2 (HR-ICPMS), boron can now be quantified at much lower values with a detection limit less than 1ppt using hot plasma and low resolution.  Arriving at this detection limit was not without its problems. Our HR-ICPMS is not a dedicated instrument, and is periodically used to analyze solution matrices with high boron, silicon, and phosphorous levels.  Boron has a tendency to exhibit memory effects, making it a challenge to measure boron at trace levels following other analyses.  Aspirating a dilute solution of nitric acid, hydrogen peroxide, and hydrofluoric acid has proven to be an efficient way to remove and control boron's memory effect in the nebulizer, spray chamber, and torch.  Other steps taken to improve the measurement of low-level boron in ultrapure water will be discussed in the presentation.

    5-0 out of 5 stars about the movie play time......
    This movie contains lots of actions(for those whom are interested in this genre of erotica movies). The story is basically about the sex life of two women and their sexual affairs with their friend's husband(not going to explain too much). I bought a copy of the VHS tape from videoflicks.com(canada) as Amazon.com no longer have any stock of this title(could be ceased).

    4-0 out of 5 stars simply the best
    I thought this selection was as I said in the title, simply the best video of its kind ever put out. I have the dvd in the uncut version. The action between Jennifer Burton and the b movie princess herself ( Monique Parent ) is the main focus of the flick.The b movie queen, by the way would be Shannon Whirry who not only is a better actress but has a killer body. Anyway Play Time goes where no other movie does.....right to the heart of multi-gendered erotica. It does not "pussy foot" around. Instead it gives the viewer a realistic look at the lives of two couples who ore totally immersed in each other's lives. Julie Strain makes a too short appearance. All 3 of the main female characters are great but the most underrated is Ms. Burton. Buy it and watch over and aver again. You won't be disappointed. ... Read more


    18. A Time to Kill
    Director: Joel Schumacher
    list price: $6.93
    our price: $6.93
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    Asin: 6304259131
    Catlog: Video
    Sales Rank: 1787
    Average Customer Review: 4.07 out of 5 stars
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    Amazon.com

    You wouldn't know it by watching the Batman movies they collaborated on, but this smart adaptation of John Grisham's novel proves that director Joel Schumacher and screenwriter Akiva Goldsman have some talent when the right project comes along. Schumacher had previously directed Grisham's The Client, and brought equal craft and intelligence to this story about a young Southern attorney (Matthew McConaughey, in his breakthrough role) who defends a black father (Samuel L. Jackson) after he kills two men who raped his young daughter. Sandra Bullock plays the passionate law student who serves as McConaughey's legal aide and voice of conscience in the racially charged drama. Added to the star power of the lead roles is a fine supporting cast, including Kevin Spacey, Ashley Judd, and Oliver Platt. --Jeff Shannon ... Read more

    Reviews (92)

    3-0 out of 5 stars Racism, violence, white trash, murder ("Jerry! Jerry!")
    "A Time to Kill" has good intentions. It stars:

    Matthew McConaughey as lawyer Jake Brigance

    Samuel L. Jackson as Carl Lee Hailey, a father who kills to avenge the rape of his little girl

    Kevin Spacey as the snide, sinister District Attorney

    Sandra Bullock as Brigance's law clerk, Ellen "Rork in Boston, but Row Ark in Mississippi"

    Ashley Judd as Jake Brigance's wife

    Oliver Platt is Jake's buddy Harry Rex

    Keifer Sutherland as a vengeful redneck

    and Donald Sutherland as eccentric, civil-rights-activist/disbarred lawyer/drunk/mentor Lucien Wilbanks

    With an all star cast like that, you can't go wrong, and the film, at least plot-wise, doesn't. Carl Lee Hailey's 10-year-old daughter is raped and left for dead by two white trash redneck dopeheads. Enraged, Hailey takes justice into his own hands and fatally shoots the two rapists as they leave the courthouse. Everyone in the small Mississippi town hears the news within minutes and takes sides, and Hailey hires a young ham-and-egger, Brigance, to defend him. As Brigance tries to avoid a conviction from the all-white jury, the brother of one of the rapists (played by Keifer Sutherland) gets together a couple of good ole boys to form a chapter of the Ku Klux Klan. Violence erupts, protesters march and chant, death threats and burning crosses abound, everyone is covered at all times with a sheen of oily sweat, and there's even an explosion.

    "A Time to Kill" is like the "Jerry Springer Show," but intelligent.

    The dialogue, however, could use work. It seems as if a good writer and a mediocre writer banged out the script, then cut it up and shuffled it together, intermingling the really well-written scenes with some really choppy dialogue.

    The same goes for the acting. Jackson, Spacey, and McConaughey are excellent and convincing in their roles. Platt is charming as Jake's best friend and a sleazy divorce lawyer.

    However, Judd is useless and even childish in her role as a trophy wife, and Bullock, as Jake's law clerk, sounds as if she's a shy girl in a high-school play who hasn't quite memorized her lines yet. (This really irked me because in the book version, her character was headstrong, outspoken, and very smart.)

    I encourage anyone to rent the movie for themselves. It's definitely worth seeing, even if the writing and acting is a little off in places. The story redeems the bad acting.

    5-0 out of 5 stars I Love This Movie!
    This movie is one of my favorites and I highly recommend that everyone see it because it is thought provoking and it forces you to put yourself in the character's shoes and think about what you would do. The movie begins with the brutal rape of a little black Mississippi girl by two white men. The girl's father Carl Lee, played by Samuel L. Jackson, then shoots and kills the guys- in the courthouse, mind you. Matthew McConaughey plays Carl Lee's attorney, Jake Brigance. The plot line continues with bouts including the KKK and the NAACP. Something notable that I really like is the exposing of the NAACP's arrogance and crookedness that happens all too often in real life. All of the actors do a great job in this film. Kevin Spacey is the prosecutor and Sandra Bullock plays Brigance's legal aid, whom he almost ends up having an affair when his wife (Ashley Judd) leaves town for her and their daughter's safety. If nothing else, you've got to see this movie for the fact that Matt McConaughey is the leading man. He is so hot! Even though I disagree with the verdict, A Time To Kill is a must see if you haven't viewed it yet. Bravo!

    5-0 out of 5 stars Grisham At His Best
    A Time to Kill is my favorite Grisham book, and the movie follows suit. The book, which was the first one published but did not become popular until The Firm becase a success, seems to be the most "grounded" with a "real" feel to it unlike some of the other ones which tend to stretch credibility a bit more (but are fun to read anyway.)

    4-0 out of 5 stars Closing Arguments
    A Time To Kill, is one of only two of John Grisham's legal thrillers that I have read, cover to cover. The other is The Chamber. I have to say, that while the book of ATTK is a bit better, then the film version, there's no denying the movie has a lot going for it...making for a very good film.

    In a small southern town, black man Carl Lee Hailey (Samuel L. Jackson) awaits trial for murdering the two rednecks who viciously raped his 10-year-old daughter. Jake Brigance (Matthew McConaughey) is a young, idealistic white lawyer, who decides to take on the father's defense. The incendiary case becomes a firestorm of racism and controversy, ripping the town apart. This, as Jake goes up against the community's most successful D.A. (Kevin Spacey), while reluctanly accepting help with the case from a law student (Sandra Bullock).

    It's amazing how good this film is, especially when one considers what director Joel Schumacher and its adapter
    Akiva Goldsman, would team up to do on Batman And Robin. At it's center, McConaughey gives his best perfomance to date. He captures the the escence of his novel counterpart to a tee. Jackson is also quite convincing as a man on trial. The rest of the all star cast is very good here--although Bullock shares nice moments with McConaughey--she seems out of step and is suprisingly the film's weakest link. Some have said the movie is over crowded with too many subplots, while that is true to a certain extent I guess, Goldsman's script and Schumacher somehow balance it all. The film takes a few liberties, but, basically stays true to the source material.

    Like most John Grisham books turned movies, the DVD lacks anything substantial, in the way of bonus material. Production notes and the film's theatrical trailer is all you get...Special Edition anyone?

    A Time To Kill offers fine performances and rock solid drama. The film is a winner and one of the best Grisham adaptations out there

    5-0 out of 5 stars Intense Grisham Drama
    Set in the deep south, where prejudice dies hard and bigotry still runs rampant, this intense crime drama finds the bright (although penniless) young lawyer Jake Brigance (Matthew McConaughey) fighting to keep a black man from the gas chamber, and struggling to protect the lives of his friends and family. When Carl Lee Haley's (Samuel L. Jackson) nine-year-old daughter is brutally raped and beaten by some local good-old-boys, he fears the court will not serve justice and takes matters in his own hands, gunning down and killing the two boys on the courthouse steps. Carl Lee calls for Jake to take up his defense, although he has never handled a murder case.
    The tension rises and intensity level of the plot increases as the local KKK is united, big wigs come in from the NAACP, Klu Klux Klan, and high dollar prosecutors. When the KKK sets a burning cross in their yard, Jake's wife and daughter flee town, only to have their beautifully restored Victorian home burned to the ground days later by the protestors. In the courtroom, Jake finds himself pitted against his worse legal-world enemy (Kevin Spacey) and the courtroom antics are nothing short of breathtaking. Donald Sutherland, Sandra Bullock and Oliver Platt make up Jake's patchwork defense team and provide fantastic character studies.
    This film earns the top rating for the reasons: 1)by staying true to Grisham's first legal novel of the same name; and 2) because of the deep understanding these characters give us to the world of the prejudice south, the love of a father, and the desperate yearning for justice. Ultimately, Jake must put himself in the place of each of the jurors to fight for Carl Lee's freedom. He must learn that he is not black, will never be black, but the issues are not always colored. ... Read more


    19. Separate But Equal
    Director: George Stevens Jr.
    list price: $9.98
    our price: $9.98
    (price subject to change: see help)
    Asin: 6302180899
    Catlog: Video
    Sales Rank: 1193
    Average Customer Review: 5 out of 5 stars
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    Reviews (13)

    5-0 out of 5 stars A Powerful American Epic
    Separate But Equal is a riveting portrayal of the struggle for desegration of the public schools. While some liberties are taken to enhance the story for television, it is still of reasonable historical accuracy. Sidney Poitier and Burt Lancaster turn in solid performances as opposing counsel. However, the real star of this video is the far lesser known Richard Kiley who turns in an excellent portrayal of Chief Justice Earl Warren. As a result, the stronger half of the story turns out to be the second part which provides a fascinating look at Warren's struggle to guide the court through the bitterly divisive issue of whether segregation in the public schools was unconstitutional. The intellectual battles among such strong willed men as Justices Douglas, Frankfurter, and Reed and the difficulties of the latter two to come to a resolution of the issue is masterfully portrayed. All in all, this is clearly one of the best historically based presentations I have seen in recent years.

    5-0 out of 5 stars First rate docudrama on Brown v. Board of Education
    "Separate But Equal" puts three names about the credits: Sidney Portier as Thurgood Marshall, Burt Lancaster as John W. Davis, and Richard Kiley as Earl Warren. This is significant because it helps to personify the three sides in the monumental Supreme Court decision of Brown v. Board of Education. Marshall headed the NAACP lawyers who challenged the legal doctrine that legitimized segregation in the South. Davis represented the interests of the states, not out of a sense of bigotry but out of legal principle; after all, it was the Supreme Court that had established the separate but equal doctrine. This becomes a key part of the dilemma that Chief Justice Warren faced because the law was obviously legal--it just also happened to be wrong.

    This excellent 1991 docudrama was aired in two parts. The first part looks at the segregated school system in Claredon County, South Carolina, one of the four cases that comprised the ruling, and the harm of segregation is captured in a memorable sequence in which young black children always pick the white doll rather than the black doll to describe who is smarter, better, etc. The second part of the film deals with the lengthy process by which the high court deliberated the case, doing a better job of capturing the process than any drama I have ever seen.

    Portier provides Marshall with all the dignity appropriate to the role, and it is a treat to see the actor play a lawyer arguing before the high court. Lancaster, in his final role, performs a key function: he is earnest and likeable, which means that in the context of this story our opposition has to be to his position and not to him personally. In other words, this is a legal matter that has to be determined on the point of law and not on our feelings about bigots and racism. However, writer/director George Stevens, Jr. has set us up, because for Kiley's Earl Warren it is a question of justice rather than the law, especially after the former Governor of California visits the battlefield at Gettysburg and discovers his driver had to sleep in the car because no local hotel would accept a black.

    For me this is Kiley's film and the most fascinating part of "Separate But Equal" is watching him rally the Court to make its landmark ruling. This is a long, hard, effort for Kiley, who insists that a unanimous ruling is important to make it clear to the nation that there is no longer two sides to this issue. I appreciated that Stevens simply has Kiley read the actual ruling at the film's climax. Again, Stevens using a simple image to bring home the significance of the ruling as the preacher and father who were at the heart of the case we watched in the first part hear the news on the radio, pull over their car, get out and kneel by the side of the road to give thanks.

    At 193 minutes this docudrama would consume a week of class, but it could be well worth the effort. Certainly screening it for students would produce some interesting questions and discussions. Final comment: Stevens uses irony throughout "Separate but Equal" (e.g., Marshall and the NAACP lawyers cannot get a cab to take them to the Supreme Court to hear the decision), but there is one delightful use of humor, when a young white lawyer who is helping with the appeal explains to the NAACP lawyers why he is there working with them.

    5-0 out of 5 stars They play in the streets together, they separate for school.

    "John, if this case goes before the Supreme Court. . . I'm gonna need you"

    It's the early 1950's, in America. The governor of South Carolina James Francis Byrnes, in his 70's at the time, pays a visit to his friend, the famous lawyer John W. Davis. Davis had argued 138 cases in front of the Supreme Court. Byrnes was turning to him for help.

    Byrnes was determined to show that discrimination and segregation in public schools were not the same thing. He wanted black school children to have equal schools. He was ashamed of the terrible condition the black schools were in, in his state of South Carolina. He even levied a three percent sales tax to fund the improvement of black schools. He was prepared to spend 75 million dollars to improve the public schools for black children in his state.

    But he knew, that the small case that a few courageous people (Harry Briggs, Reverand J.A. Delaine) had started in Clarendon county, SC, was too big of an issue for his efforts alone. The case was on it's way to the Supreme Court of the United States of America.

    The National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (the NAACP), had become involved. Their head lawyer, Thurgood Marshall had combined this case and four other similar cases (from Delaware, Kansas, DC and Virginia) into one called 'Brown v. Board of Education', and made it his mission to strike down segregation in public schools in America.

    The great thing about this movie is how it makes each side look respectable. The movie does not make this a 'bad evil white men against poor suffering black people' type of story. But rather, the film, portrays the white men as being highly respected, educated and willing to do the right thing. But at the same time, very concerned and perhaps even afraid of the consequences of their decisions.

    I also loved the humor in this film. For example when Byrnes is conversing with Davis and says 'I admit to past sins, our colored schools are a disgrace'. Or when one of the lawyers at the NAACP legal defense fund says about the South Carolina case "If we win this one, we'll only have 11,172 school districts left."

    The heart of this film is the uncommon courage of the people. Courage among so many involved. Of course, first from the blacks from those small towns, who risked their jobs and safety, and faced the hate of the Ku Klux Klan, by taking these complaints to their local lawyers. Then, to the NAACP, for climbing this long and expensive uphill battle. But also, to the judges on the Supreme Court, and in particular the Chief Judge Earl Warren.

    Warren was quoted as saying 'Everything that I did in life that was worthwhile, I caught hell for.' What a difficult decision, but what a remarkable effort on his part to unite the nine members of the Supreme Court to conclude the case with a unanimous decision to end segregation in public schools in America.

    It took a lot of brave people on both sides, to end separation of black and white school children in public schools. Perhaps Thurgood Marshall summed it up best, when he mocked the thinking of people in the south by saying 'you can have them attending the same State Universities and Graduate schools, but if they attend the same elementary and high schools together, the world would fall apart.'

    A wonderful treasured movie. Must see for all.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Great Film - Typical Rotten Artisan DVD
    This is one of the best films made for TV. It tells the story of the groundbreaking Supreme Court case that put Thurgood Marshall in the minds of most educated Americans.

    However, this is a terrible DVD. The colors are dark. There is no sharpness to the film at all. In effect, it is worse than what you saw when it originally came out. As usual, Artisan does not take advantage of the DVD technology. I tried to contact them, but their website has no email address. This DVD is cheaply made, which is a shame. This a film classic, much more deserving than the shabby treatment Artisan has given it. This ranks right up there with the horrible DVD that Artisan made of "The Quiet Man." Please Artisan, either give us good copies of these great films, or quit ruining them.

    FIVE STARS FOR THE FILM, 1 STAR FOR ARTISAN

    5-0 out of 5 stars Great historical/legal drama
    I thoroughly enjoyed this historical dama about Briggs v. Elliott. It was a great drama, seemed very accurate, portrayed a little-known legal "Super Bowl" between my hero, John W Davis, and Thurgood Marshall. Everybody should watch it. ... Read more


    20. The Crucible
    Director: Nicholas Hytner
    list price: $9.98
    our price: $9.98
    (price subject to change: see help)
    Asin: 079394144X
    Catlog: Video
    Sales Rank: 2252
    Average Customer Review: 4.44 out of 5 stars
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    Amazon.com

    The Salem witch hunts are given a new and nasty perspective when a vengeful teenage girl uses superstition and repression to her advantage, creating a killing machine that becomes a force unto itself. Pulsating with seductive energy, this provocative drama is as visually arresting as it is intellectually engrossing. Arthur Miller based his classic 1953 play on the actual Salem witch trials of 1692, creating what has since become a durable fixture of school drama courses. It may look like a historical drama, but Miller also meant the work as a parable for the misery created by the McCarthy anti-Communist hearings of the 1950s. This searing version of his drama delves into matters of conscience with concise accuracy and emotional honesty. Three passionate cheers for Miller, director Nicholas Hytner, and costars Daniel Day-Lewis and Winona Ryder. --Rochelle O'Gorman ... Read more

    Reviews (77)

    4-0 out of 5 stars It's About Time
    You'd be hard pressed to find a story more compelling than the one that inspired Arthur Miller's 1953 drama The Crucible. Except the one about how it became a movie. It's taken all these years to bring a full version to the screen, and the only thing that explains it is Hollywood's perpetual cluelessness. The Salem witch trials of 1692 destroyed nineteen lives and countless reputations. Hoodwinked by a bunch of flighty teenage girls who wished to escape a whipping for their frolics in the woods, the town brought in the colony magistrates to sort out the devils from the angels.

    Miller, who also wrote the screenplay, expresses his blatant contempt for hypocrisy in all forms through the character of John Proctor (Daniel Day-Lewis), a humble but once-adulterous farmer. Proctor's sexual escapades with the town's main accuser Abigail Williams (Winona Ryder) could, through the girl's treachery, end in his wife's hanging. He can either save himself with a lie or free Elizabeth (Joan Allen) with the truth about himself and Abigail.

    It's potent stuff any way you slice it, and the actors here aren't afraid to take big bites of their meaty roles. The film's pacing is fast and furious, hysterical like the history of the event it interprets. If it lacks the McCarthyist subtext it once had, so what. This here's a tragedy--a good old American one.

    The movie's inevitable ending won't satisfy those who want only fluff and feathers at the cinema, but the hard lesson won by those who refuse to compromise their principles can't be denied. The Crucible is a faithful testament to their sacrifice.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Great Adaptation of an American Masterpiece
    Since Miller helped write the screenplay and one of his sons produced or coproduced the movie, it shouldn't be a shock that the movie is so faithful to the original text where it needs to be and broadens the story where it needs to, as well. Miller knows how to write for the stage, and he apparently knows how to write for the screen, also. After seeing so many "classic" books and/or plays butchered by Hollywood, this movie is a real delight, despite its morbid and all-too-realistic story. This movie has become an essential to my Grade 11 American Literature classes, spectacularly complementing their reading of Miller's play and several pieces from the Salem Witch Trial era.

    Ignoring the play's historic flaws and inaccuracies (that's another debate for another time), Miller brilliantly captured the essence of the Salem Witch Trials in his play and has conveyed them to the screen. Hatred, fear, jealousy, hypocrisy, religious mania, attention-seeking, conviction, strength, determination, repentance, and a host of other emotions and character traits are vividly brought to life by a superb cast: Daniel Day-Lewis is a great John Proctor (nobody else could have done better), Winona Ryder is very good as the conniving and bitter Abigail Williams, Joan Allen was nominated for an Oscar for her portrayal of Elizabeth Proctor, and Paul Scofield should have won an Oscar for his cold-hearted portrayal of Justice Danforth. The conflict between Proctor and Danforth is what sustains the play's momentum for the second and third acts (about the last hour and fifteen minutes of the movie), and Lewis and Scofield bring that epic conflict to life: the classic good v. evil, with the sides getting somewhat mixed up as to who is who. . . . Lewis plays the flawed hero to Scofield's self-righteous and vindictive villain with palpable energy. How Scofield's performance was overlooked by the Academy is just another example of their oblivion. He gives me the willies with his methodical, calculating delivery of Miller's chilling dialogue: "Who weeps for these weeps for corruption" (among a bunch of great lines from the play/movie).

    This isn't simply a play enacted in front of movie cameras (like Death of a Salesman). The director uses his camera very effectively, capturing some great close-up moments, unique perspectives and camera angles, and bringing a sense of "bigness" to the whole story. The play can seem very isolated, with its sparse sets and black-and-white costumes. Miller also expands the movie to begin well before the play does (giving the movie-goer information that he must have assumed the play-reader would already have) and extending it beyond the conviction of Proctor to include his execution, along with that of Rebecca Nurse and Martha Corey. Just as a side note, each of those three was hanged in a separate group in the original trials--great symbolism from Miller, including each larger original group of victims in the final trio. Also great symbolism in Proctor's Christ-like physical placement in the middle of the two "sinners," as he takes their sins upon him--the crucifixion is represented very effectively.

    Bottom line: You won't see a better adaptation of a play to movie anytime soon. Nothing essential is left out, and some nice details are brought in to give the movie a distinction from its original source, the play. If you can make it through this play and not be outraged by the injustice and hypocrisy, then you have a heart as cold as Danforth's. What Miller would likely want you to do is apply that outrage to similar situations that go on every day, just as he intended with his original play (the McCarthy hearings, the "Red" Scare). At least watch the movie, though.

    4-0 out of 5 stars "Your justice would freeze beer."
    Although the playwright Arthur Miller was also the screenwriter for this production starring Winona Ryder and Daniel Day-Lewis, the film bears little resemblance to the play in tone and impact. Director Nicholas Hytner has abandoned the intimate, almost claustrophobic atmosphere of the dark, interior scenes in the play, in favor of an expansive setting, with many scenes set outside, including panoramic shots of Salem in 1692, full of costumed "citizens." The expanded setting makes the psychology and motivation of the witchcraft hysteria more difficult to determine, since the intensity of the settlers' repressed, interior lives is not obvious. The explanatory notes which Miller incorporates into the play about land disputes, religious controversies, and personal animosities, which led to specific individuals being accused and arrested for witchcraft, are seen only peripherally.

    As a result, we see Winona Ryder, as Abigail Williams, and her coterie of bewitched girls, screaming hysterically and accusing innocent women of witchcraft without the background which would make these accusations plausible. Her previous relationship with John Proctor (Daniel Day-Lewis), in the absence of other motivations, seems to be the primary reason for her behavior, but this thwarted love does not explain the extent of her rage and, especially, the involvement of the other girls. Day-Lewis is reduced to the role of victim, and one of the hallmarks of his acting, his subtlety, is absent here, except in a wonderful final scene with his wife, played by Joan Allen. Details of the scenery also ring false--houses in this period were very small because of the difficulty of heating, one third the size they are here, and the church/meeting houses were modest in accordance with religious restrictions against unnecessary display.

    This is a Hollywood version of the witchcraft trials, capitalizing on the sensational at the expense of the complex and subtle forces behind the accusations of witchcraft--the Indian wars which were just ending, the growing independence of individuals, the increasing resentment of hard-line theocratic rule, the abolition of traditional property laws, and most importantly, the lack of any societal role whatsoever for young women, who were not old enough to assume a woman's role and who, bored and left out of decision-making, were on their own in dealing with their adult feelings. The film is beautiful, and the acting, though one-dimensional, is as effective as it can be in the absence of fully-developed motivation for the girls' hysteria. The "witches" are reduced to cartoons here, and Miller's parallels between these trials and the McCarthy hearings of the 1950s, which give the play a modern context, are missing. Mary Whipple

    5-0 out of 5 stars A Superbly Directed and Acted Film
    It is rare nowadays that I come out of a movie feeling moved and enlightened. Suffice it to say that when I first saw The Crucible in the theatre several years ago, I left the movie understanding a bit more about human nature and a greater appreciation for the power of group hysteria. This film draws on the fine acting talents of Daniel Day-Lewis, Winona Ryder (in her best role ever), and Joan Allen. Not only is the dialogue brilliant, but the emotional content is incredibly affecting. I am so glad to see it finally on DVD. In this day and age of disposable art, it is heartening to see that movies of this caliber are still being made (even if it is with less frequency).

    5-0 out of 5 stars A great film
    I have seen this movie perhaps a dozen times, and never tire of it. It is one of the most compelling, well-written movies I can think of, and the acting is superb throughout, particularly from Day-Lewis, who gives a heart-stopping performance. Because of its theme about witches, the movie gets played a lot around Halloween, but it is by no means a horror movie. It's not even a thriller, really, yet it does manage to thrill and keep the viewer totally involved. I love this movie and can't wait for the DVD. ... Read more


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