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$16.40 list($14.95)
1. Sayonara
$29.95
2. The Happiest Days of Your Life
$12.98
3. Island in the Sun
$9.98 $6.10
4. The Fly
list($19.99)
5. The Law and Jake Wade
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6. Hell to Eternity
$27.25 list($19.98)
7. Sayonara

1. Sayonara
Director: Joshua Logan
list price: $14.95
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: B000035P7S
Catlog: Video
Sales Rank: 16857
Average Customer Review: 4.75 out of 5 stars
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Reviews (28)

5-0 out of 5 stars Wonderful love story, great acting, beautiful scenery.
This movie was nomiated for Best Picture, Best Actor(Marlon Brando), Red Buttons won Best Supporting Actor. Very moving love story, Brando is an Air Force pilot who is sent to Japan to rest up during the Korean War. He meets a Japanese actress (who hates Americans) and falls in love. The background is beautiful, some big stars had roles in this film. Brando is wonderful, as well as his co-stars.

5-0 out of 5 stars An under seen masterpiece!
When I mention the film Sayaonara to anyone who likes a good flick, the first thing they say is "never heard of it". Then I lend it to them and and they are simply speechless! Sayonara is a film that made such a strong impression on me the first time I saw it some 15 years ago, that I never forgot it and till this day I can recall the dialogue, scenery, and characters like it was yesterday. This film has always been a favorite of mine. I have a soft spot for a well made epic love story and the plot of a G.I. in a foregin land falling for a mysterious and beautiful woman. Then the realization of both characters knowing that their love may not be possible and may cause nothing but anguish and harm is simply amazing and heart felt! This film is up there with the "Love Is A Many Splendored Thing" (AND THAT MOVIE IS AMAZING!!!) as a total tear jerker. The scene where brando must follow Japanese custom and remove his shoes in his lovers house for the first time is just an all around exhale of human emotion. I cry till this day and can't wait to cry over the film in a more clearer transfer of the characters facial expressions of their emotions on screen-a CLASSIC!

5-0 out of 5 stars Sayonara
This is Brando at his very best. I loved this movie from beginning to end. It is sentimental without being sappy, it is simply a great love story without any of the modern day 'scenes'. Red Buttons is simply superb, along with James Garner. Marlon was able to do the southern accent seemingly without any variation. This movie was excellent from beginning to end and left me feeling extremely happy to have a copy. The Japanese actresses fit the roles without exception. Would recommend this movie to anyone who loves a great love story with an exceptional ending

5-0 out of 5 stars Watch it for this one scene, if nothing else.
This is a well done, enjoyable, and interesting film, and those qualities make it worth watching, but there is one scene in this film that is a high example of the filmmaker's art. This scene, in its perfection, is the most powerfully romantic movie scene I have ever beheld. This scene transcends story telling with film; it is literature.

It evokes thoughts of something from Madame Bovary (Gustave Flaubert), or Anna Karenina (Leo Tolstoy). That is to say, the scene portrays something vital about the human experience. At least it does for me; but then, I admit I'm a sucker for stories of love between American men and Asian women.

The scene to which I refer is when Lloyd Gruver (Marlon Brando) encounters Hana-ogi in Joe Kelly's (Red Buttons) house. It begins when he opens the sliding door and sees her kneeling, erect, serene, and dignified, waiting for him to arrive. If not on the first watching, then on the second, fourth, or eleventh watching, one will become aware that the lighting, the sound, the furnishings of the room, her hair, her kimonos, her makeup (especially her painted lips) are all perfect. What an ambiance! What a setting for a man and a woman to fall in love!

Gruver is immediately struck by her presence; this is plain to see. Nevertheless, he recovers his usual demeanor and proceeds to try to make small talk, his mind and body regarding this lovely creature with respect and admiration, but also lust. She just sits there, regarding him without moving, without even blinking, betraying no thoughts or emotions. His discomfort rises.

Then, when it is time and not before, she begins to speak. She speaks word of deep humanity, compassion, wisdom, and sincerity. The power of her words is greatly enhanced by the quiet dignity with which she speaks them. Gruver is dumbfounded, and Brando plays this role very well. You can see on his face (Flaubert or Tolstoy would have painted the picture with words) that his life, unexpectedly, has just been bifurcated. There is now the life before this encounter, and what will come after. He can never again be the same man. He can never again regard women the same. Hana-ogi is a new paradigm, and his lust, far from being extinguished, has maybe even been elevated, but is now part of an ethereal, not just corporeal experience. He never looked for such a thing before, because he never imagined such a woman or such a feeling could exist.

This scene is for me the climax of the film, and if the story ended there, it would be satisfyingly complete. The purpose of the rest of the story is to set the table for this connection between two immortal souls. Nevertheless, what goes before, and what ensues is still interesting and worthwhile.

Some people continue to insist such love themes are racist. That is absurd. It is the antithesis of racism. This is the profoundest love flourishing in spite of different races and cultures, and the inevitable perils incumbent with this relationship in this place at this time. This is love between a man and a woman, as unfettered by affectations and expectations as love can be. This is the raw, real thing.

Your humble correspondent was raised as far from the Enchantment of the East as one can get, and like the protagonists of this story had no expectation of being enchanted when I first traveled there. But, through experience, I can attest the irrepressible bond this film portrays between the lovers is real, and is not exaggerated. Also, the perils are real, although nowadays not the same ones.

I have been in love in Japan, China, and Southeast Asia-married once among these encounters. When a man knows love in the East, he may also know tragedy, but he'll know he's alive. This film tells this tale, exquisitely done.

5-0 out of 5 stars I love this film
I`ve seen this movie many times on cable and am always charmed by it.The delightful way the japanese women talk and Brando`s southern accent and dialogue is both charming and funny.James Garner and Red Buttons both give great supporting performances.This film will make you laugh and tug at your heartstrings.Recommended. ... Read more


2. The Happiest Days of Your Life
Director: Frank Launder
list price: $29.95
our price: $29.95
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 6303038514
Catlog: Video
Sales Rank: 2224
Average Customer Review: 5 out of 5 stars
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Description

The brilliantly droll Alastair Sim (A Christmas Carol) and the imperious Margaret Rutherford (Murder Most Foul) become reluctant allies in this madcap farce about a British girls' school that is accidentally billeted at a boys' school.The Happiest Days of Your Life, which spawned the popular St.Trinian's film series, builds from sweet chuckles to feverish laughter as children fight, teachers romance, and bungling bureaucrats sink into chaos. ... Read more

Reviews (3)

5-0 out of 5 stars GOOD BRITISH CINEMA
Waiting for a dvd release for this one.
looks dated but still funny.no dorky special effects so the actors and actresses had to act which is something you can't say today.These british films could always put a smile on your face that's why true british culture will always be ours.

5-0 out of 5 stars One of the very best of British comedies
This is a hilariously funny film, made in the early 1950's during the hey-day of England's Ealing Studios. Set in World War II England, an Academy for Young Ladies is accidentally evacuated to boys' school by the Ministry of Education. The story is a classic, however it is two of the top Ealing actors who make this film so very memorable. Alastair Sim and Joyce Grenfell are incredible as the incompetent headmaster and the never grown-up schoolmistress, respectively, who are gamely trying to cover up the potentially disasterous consequences of the Ministry's error.

For those who love old movies, old British movies at their best, or are just plain fed up with a fare of slick, expensive, plot-less Hollywood movies, I guarantee this will delight and entertain.

5-0 out of 5 stars One of the best British Comedies
This is a hilarious and funny film set in World War II England, when a girls school is accidentally evacuated to a school for boys. The story is a classic, however it is the top players who make this film so very memorable. Alastair Sim and Joyce Grenfell are incredible.

For those who love old movies, or are just plain fed up with a fare of slick, expensive, plot-less Hollywood movies, I guarantee you will love this. ... Read more


3. Island in the Sun
Director: Robert Rossen
list price: $12.98
our price: $12.98
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Asin: 0793927714
Catlog: Video
Sales Rank: 2702
Average Customer Review: 4 out of 5 stars
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Amazon.com

This race-relations film from 1957, based on a novel by Alec Waugh and set on a West Indies island, stars James Mason as a wealthy man who runs against a local union leader (Harry Belafonte). The rest of the players, one way or another, deal with the consequences of their rivalry. Mason and Belafonte leave a strong impression, but the film overall doesn't live up to its own sense of significance. Joan Collins is good as Mason's sister, who worries that the contest will cost her an engagement to the governor's son. --Tom Keogh ... Read more

Reviews (6)

4-0 out of 5 stars A PRETTY GOOD SOAP with A GREAT CAST!
After many years of trying to finally catch this one on "the telly", I recently was afforded the opportunity. As a "period piece" and "social commentary", the film works fairly well. One most realize that miscegenation was still a taboo in the 50's when this film was made; thus, it was considered a violation of "the natural order of things" in much of the Deep South. While the "romance" between Dorothy Dandridge ("Margot Seaton") and John Justin ("David Archer") was displayed, all that Harry Belafonte ("David Boyeur") and Joan Fontaine ("Mavis Norman") could muster were some occasional glances and a verbal exchange about the pros and cons of interracial relations.

In light of the controversy surrounding the recent "Monster's Ball", we may not have matured as much as we think.

Many of the other roles are filled by those that were under contract to Twentieth Century-Fox, the releasing company: Joan Collins (Jocelyn Fluery"), previously seen in "Land of the Pharoahs", Michael Rennie ("Hilary Carson"), earlier featured in "The Robe" and the classic "The Day the Earth Stood Still", and Patricia Owens ("Sylvia Fluery")from"The Fly".

Even James Mason ("Maxwell Fluery") had been featured in the Lucille Ball-Desi Arnaz vehicle for Fox "Forever, Darling".

Future "Ben-Hur" villain Stephen Boyd ("Euan Templeton") is on hand as the romantic interest for Collins.

While the acting is equal to the talented cast, it is character veteran John Williams that steals the show. As "Colonel Whittingham", the police investigator of a character's demise, he seems as a precursor to television's "Columbo". Crafty, witty, and verbally adept, his "flatfoot" is not one's typical cop.

In all, the film is enjoyable, not only for the performances but for the lush scenery and the glimpse at how movies "dared" to do something different in the 50's.

3-0 out of 5 stars Way too much going on here!
Race-relations film that just has too much going on--this is based on Alec Waugh's book and is a prime example of the difficulties of adapting a novel with many complex themes and characters into only a 2-hour film (it should have been more like 3) since it felt as if they tried to cram as much people and story lines in as possible and as a result some of the characters lacked essential development. The ensemble cast includes a whole roster of name-stars: James Mason, Joan Fontaine, Harry Belafonte, Joan Collins, Dorothy Dandridge and Stephen Boyd. The story takes place in the beautiful Caribbean on the small island of Santa Marta--and as we soon discover, it is a hotbed of race relations (and interrelations!). Mason stars as Maxwell Fleury, the prodigal son of one of the island's oldest and most prominent families. Despite having no shortage of money, living in an impressive villa-like home by the sea (but then again, on a tiny isle like this I'm sure every home is pretty much near the sea!) with a lovely young wife, he's an intense, insecure and embittered middle-aged man who makes himself miserable believing wifey is cheating and (understandably) angered over his father's favoritism with Max's deceased older brother. Joan Collins is eye-catching in both appearance and performance as Max's very beautiful sister Jocelyn, an enchanting young woman under whose calm, unruffled surface runs conflicting emotions and smoldering passions that are ignited when she falls for the governor's dashing son (Boyd)--resulting in unintended consequences and surprising revelations. The very handsome and charismatic Belafonte plays David Boyeur, a fiery union leader-populist who wants to usher in a new era of change for his people and is scornful of the old guard which families like the Fleurys represent.

Tensions flare when Max decides the island "is going to the dogs" and since he has a well-known name and nothing much to do with his time, he decides to make an ill-conceived run for the legislature against David. Further complications ensue when Max discovers that he has mixed blood, or as they say in the quaint vernacular, "a touch of the tar brush." Fontaine and Dandridge's characters I felt were lacking character development in their peripheral roles as two women--one white, the other black--who get involved in interracial affairs. Fontaine plays Max's sister-in-law Mavis Normand, an unmarried and older society woman, who becomes David's lover; and the ravishing Dandridge plays Margot Seaton and catches the eye of an ambitious governor's aide. Too bad more screen time wasn't spent exploring them--instead it seemed as if they were "used" as examples of one mixed relationship being "successful," the other not. Oh yeah, besides these matters of race, romantic entanglements, adultery, premarriage pregnancy and politicking, there's murder too. I'm surprised the makers of this movie didn't include incest, rape and natural disaster as well! But in fairness the film handles the subject matters in a nonjudgemental and nonlurid fashion and was enhanced by the gorgeous color cinematography, beautiful island scenery and lovely tropical title tune sung by Belafonte.

5-0 out of 5 stars A Film That Captures the Turbulence of its Time
"Island in the Sun" is a beautiful film that was partially filmed in Barbados. It includes scenes of the sugar mill where my mother played as a child, which is now owned by my aunt, Shirley King, who, at present, is Secretary to the country's Prime Minister, Owen Arthur, and it gives the viewer a splendid shot of the beach where my parents walked with my older sister and me when I was a toddler.
The interracial romances may have raised a few eyebrows at the time, and I am all too familiar with life in the state that banned this film upon its original release. The majority of Americans probably couldn't relate to an educated Black populace
struggling for its independance, or shouting down the orations of a white politician they didn't trust, as was played by James Mason. But the charismatic character, David, played by a strapping Harry Belafonte, is typical of many Blacks in the Carribean. What Americans often fail to appreciate is the fact that the slaves of the Carribean were freed and educated sooner than they were in the United States, and that few who understand the culture of most Carribean Islands would bat an eyelash at the thought of their being in positions of leadership.This film was made to entertain an America that still had a long way to as far as improvement in race relations was concerned. Consequently, Dorothy Dandridge's Margot could not kiss her White lover.
But in showing the corruption of the White establishment, exemplified by Joan Collins, James Mason, et. al, we see the justification for the fight for the full citizenship of the Blacks of the island. Joan Fontaine is Harry Belafonte's love interest who is sympathetic to his plight, but still condescending towards the people he represents. Ultimately David sacrifices their relationship to appease those who would consider him a sell-out if he married a White woman while fighting on behalf of Blacks. Dorothy Dandridge, who is free of similar preasures, although not free of criticism, marries the man she loves.
This is a terrific presentation, filled with beautiful tropical scenery, and multiple tales about jealousy, murder,bigotry, scandalous behavior, sacrifice, of the rising status of some, and the declining status of others.It is also a tale of finding one's proper place in life, and remaining true to oneself.--A great movie! One of the best of 1957!

5-0 out of 5 stars Island in the Sun
Island in the Sun makes you wish you where on the that Island. What can I say, Dorothy Dandridge, Harry Belafonte, and Joan Collins were youngest and most attractive in this movie. This movie displays interacial relationships, pre-marital sex, marital affairs, and even murder. There's so many scandals going on in this movie you can hardly keep with all of them. The movie ending is so peaceful....almost like it started.....with a view of the Island.....It's a must see!

4-0 out of 5 stars Island in the Sun
I've not yet seen the movie, but i'm dying to do so. If anyone out there can tell me how to get a copy of the movie, I would really appreciate it. I'm starting a new collection of movies and this one is on my list. (also on the list: Cotton Club, Porgy and Bess) I'm having trouble finding these as well. :) ... Read more


4. The Fly
Director: Kurt Neumann
list price: $9.98
our price: $9.98
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 6300247589
Catlog: Video
Sales Rank: 11912
Average Customer Review: 4.39 out of 5 stars
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Amazon.com

A dashing scientist's foolhardy experiment with matter transferenceleads his wife to seriously consider investing in No-pest strips in this deservedly classic melding of the horror, sci-fi, and mystery genres. The marvelous Vincent Price (as the good guy for a change!) leads an admirably straight-faced cast through this taut tale of man intruding on God's domain, presented in reverse flashback order. (Somewhat surprisingly, paid-by-the-pound novelist James Clavell was responsible for the atypically lean screenplay.) This well-paced, blackly humorous yarn can't hold a muck-encrusted candle to director David Cronenberg's ultra-visceral 1986 reimagining, but still contains some remarkably daring imagery for the time period. Squirmy, shuddery fun that still carries an icky jolt, particularly during its justifiably famous final scene. --Andrew Wright ... Read more

Reviews (18)

4-0 out of 5 stars Hellllp Meeee!
The film opens on the scene of a man who has been crushed in a machine and his wife said she is the one who pushed the lever, but something does not fit and her brother in law (Vincent Price) doesn't think she did it. This launches us into into a re-telling of how the women's scientist husband was obsessed with a matter dis-integrater he was working on. Something goes wrong with his work and he winds up with a fly head and hand. Now his wife is quickly trying to find the fly with her husbands head so that they can put him back together. This is better than the majority of science fiction during the 50's because the story tries to focus on the invention instead of falling into the old mad scientist routine. The film also shows the scientist as a tragic victim instead of as rampaging monster (which is what happened in way too many 50's films). The special effects are good enough and the acting is solid.

5-0 out of 5 stars The original sci-fi/horror classic....."help me! help me!"
What makes "The Fly" a classic of Horror/Science Fiction is not when we finally see that Andre Delambre (David Hedison) has the head of a fly, but when we see the screaming face of his wife Helen (Patricia Owens) multiplied by the insect's multi-faceted eye. But even that scene is nothing compared to when Francois Delambre (Vincent Price) and Inspector Charas (Herbert Marshall), discover a fly with the head and arm of a human, trapped in a spider's web and screaming "Help me!" over and over again in a high pitched voice of terror. Francois had been helping Andre with his teleportation experiments, which were going well until Andre used himself as the test subject and never noticed there was a fly in the chamber with him. David Cronenberg remade this film to show how this would have "really" happened, but this is one of those films where most of us willingly suspend our disbelief and go along for the ride. The story is told in flashback as a distraught Helen, accused of having crushed her husband's head and arm in a press, frantically insists no one in house hurt a fly--especially if it has a white head. With a script by James Clavell based on the story by George Langelaan (it appeared in Playboy with the artwork of a white page on which there was one small fly), this 1958 film was directed by Kurt Neumann. Do not even talk to me about the sequel, "The Return of the Fly," which shows how laughable such a story can be when the writing and acting is second-rate. If you want a double-feature, do this and the original version of "The Thing," one week and their remakes the next.

4-0 out of 5 stars THE FLY, THE ORIGINAL FLY.
1958's "The Fly" is the main inspiration of the 1986 version, the version that most of the people know. Not as flashy as the 1986 David Cronenberg's version, but the original "Fly" remains very intriguing. "The Fly" is more a mystery film than a thriller.

More storytelling oriented, "The Fly" is a very interesting movie, it's really hard to ignore the power of the film, because the "monster" has human feelings and human fears. You can't help but feel sorry for this unlucky scientist and his family

And yes, the final scene is very disturbing, after almost 50 years, still is a very shocking image.

5-0 out of 5 stars The Fly: Sight + Sound = Despair
One of the best horror films of any age is the 1958 version of THE FLY. What director Kurt Neumann has created is a film that includes the shock moments required of any horror movie, but to these moments he adds a disturbing montage of sight and sound that grab at the reader to yank him into the minds of the actors so that the viewer can see and hear the horror up close. Only the best science fiction movies can do this.
The movie begins in a flashback when Francois Delambre (Vincent Price) discovers that his sister-in-law Helen (Patricia Owen) has been accused of murdering her husband Andre (David Hedison) by squashing his head in a compressor. Her story forms the basis of the film. She insists that she is neither insane nor a cold-blooded murderer. Helen tells Francois that her scientist-husband Andre had been experimenting with a matter transportation device as in STAR TREK, but in this case, he had inadvertently allowed a housefly to enter the transportation chamber with himself. The result of the experiment was a man with the head and arm of a fly and a fly with the head and arm of a man. Scriptwriter James Clavell of SHOGUN fame had apparently never heard of a pattern buffer that could allow for simultaneous transport of dissimilar DNA hosts. What makes THE FLY click is Andre's reaction to his new form and Helen's acceptance of that reaction. At first, Andre is grief stricken, and tries to hide his condition from her. He places a scarf over his head and keeps his fly-claw in his pocket. There is no need for any fancy special effects here. The simple use of a scarf is all that is required to generate suspense. Later, when it is time to eat, Helen brings soup which he loudly slurps. This soup scene is one of a series of images that are all the more horrible for their morphed simplicity. The viewer can nearly literally taste what life is like for a man/fly hybrid. Andre communicates to Helen by using his human arm to scrawl messages, leaving her puzzled and anguished over her inability to help. She determines to see the face under the scarf and rips it off. This scene is one of the two indelible unions of sight and sound that cause viewers to remember THE FLY as some surreal mixture of a paradoxical link of disgust with an unwillingness to turn away their heads. As she sees Andre's head, the camera shifts perspective to Andre, who sees her as only a fly can: as a infinity of kaleidoscopic images of a screaming woman with each of an infinity of mouths howling an infinity of pain. Once she can gather herself together, she tries to help by recapturing the fly with Andre's head. Since a fly's lifespan is quite limited, the only hope she has to regain her husband is to find that fly, an unlikely prospect at best. In despair, he asks her to kill him with that compressor. She does so, and the movie reverts to the present with Francois discussing the case with Inspector Charas (Herbert Marshall). Each is sure that Helen has gone quietly mad, thus legally preventing her from trial. As Francois and Charas exit the house, the movie's second unforgettable grafting of sight to sound occurs when they see that a strange-looking fly has become entangled in a spider's web, and the spider, looking as large and ferocious as the monster in TARANTULA, looms ever closer. The camera zooms on the fly which has Andre's head attached. The viewer can see his eyes bug out as the spider approaches. He shouts a squeaky HELP ME over and over, but Francois is too slow to react. The spider kills the fly just before Francois kills the spider with a large rock.
The horror of THE FLY does not diminish with repeated viewings nor can the later remakes and sequels detract from its suggestion that the most ordinary things in nature can change into something so terrible as to cause the audience to squirm in its seat and think that the weirdness on the screen is not so far fetched at all.

5-0 out of 5 stars Intelligent Sci Fi thriller that packs a punch
I hate it when reviewers state that these types of films "still hold up quite well" or worse still "are quite dated". Dated compared to what? They weren't being made with 2002 audiences in mind and any film is "dated" after the year it is released. These types of Sci Fi efforts dont need to be viewed according to how films are made now. Simply appreciate them for the imagination they show in their special effects and story telling.

There is certainly alot to appreciate and enjoy in 1958's classic "The Fly". It is a film which I think is amazing in the story it tells which is both horrifying and very sad and at times very touching. The production as a whole is lush with beautiful Fox colour and a cast of fine, restrained performers who deliver thoughtful performances and who have an obvious respect for the material they are working with.

Heading the cast is one of my favourite actors Vincent Price playing Francois Delambre in a restrained performance which I feel is one of his finest. David (Al) Hedison who later found fame on the "Voyage to the Bottom of the Sea" TV Series in the early sixities plays his brother Andre, a brilliant scientist and delves into the area of matter transfer with horrifying results. He makes the fatal mistake of using himself as a Guinea Pig in his experiments with the result that his own matter becomes entangled with that of a fly unwittingly involved in the transfer experiment. The result is one of the very best special effects efforts to come out of the 1950's in that Andre acquires the head and arm of the fly and his head and arm is transferred to that of the fly. It is a horrific look which still scares me to this day so effective is it in its depiction. The unveiling scene where Andre's wife Helene (played very effectively by Patricia Owens) pulls the black sheet off Andre's head is still one of the classic scenes in Science Fiction drama as her horrified reaction is multipled on screen as she screams in discovering the terrible truth of what has happened to her husband.

Andre's descent into desperation and madness as the fly's characteristics take him over are tragically done. His efforts to eat a meal from under his black sheet, his out of control "Fly" arm taking on a life of its own, and his frantic efforts to try to communicate with others using a type writer are graphically portrayed and are very disturbing. Never though is he really viewed as some sort of deranged monster out to harm anyone, rather an unfortunate individual who was careless in his experiments for one split second. When he scrawls on the blackboard that he still loves Helene while trying to control the horrible fly claw, for one moment an essentially horrific story takes on that of a great love story and our sympathy is totally with Andre in his dilemma.

Patricia Owens also deserves special mention for her performance in "The Fly" as well. Hers could have been a thankless love interest role however she infuses her character with real strength and the scenes of her and her son Philippe trying desperately to catch the fly with the human head in the house and garden are real edge of the seat suspense.

"The Fly" is intelligently written, very smoothly produced and has a good balance between story/character development and the essential horror tale. It is without a doubt one of the very best of the Sci Fi efforts to come out of the 1950's along with the original "Invasion of the Body Snatchers", "Them" and "It Came From Outer Space". Enjoy it as intelligent drama that doesn't strick for sensation in every frame. I get new things to appreciate from it with every screening. ... Read more


5. The Law and Jake Wade
Director: John Sturges
list price: $19.99
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 6302604931
Catlog: Video
Sales Rank: 22737
Average Customer Review: 4 out of 5 stars
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Reviews (4)

3-0 out of 5 stars Quality western
The Law and Jake Wade is an entertaining western about a reformed outlaw trying to escape his past. Jake Wade, played by Robert Taylor, is trying to go straight only to run into his former gang led by Richard Widmark. A past incident involving hidden money leads Widmark to kidnap Wade and his fiancee. He leads them into the desert where they fight off Comanches as well as themselves.

This is a good movie that most western fans will enjoy. Taylor and Widmark are very good as ex-partners who reunite. As another reviewer points out, there seems to be a real friendship between the two men. The showdown at the conclusion is very well done if a little predictable. Nevertheless, this is a good movie that looks better in letterbox as I saw it on TCM. Very entertaining and well worth the watch!

5-0 out of 5 stars Violence and Regrets
This neglected Western is one of John Sturges best. Richard Widmark and Robert Taylor are compelling as former partners now on opposite sides of the law. There is a lingering sense of regret between the two protagonists that is rare in movies. And for all his villiany, there is something very likable about the Widmark character. This is a character driven Western at its best. Except for the Boetticher and Mann films, there is not much better. Another great Western with this theme that is hard to find (because it is out of print) is Last Train from Gun Hill.

4-0 out of 5 stars 'Modest' Western worth of all Sturges' bigger famous films.
'The Law And Jake Wade' came out in the same year as Anthony Mann's last Western, 'Man Of The West', with which it shares many narrative, thematic and visual affinities. Both centre on ex-outlaws who have tried to turn away from a life of crime, but who are violently dragged back by companions from the past; the struggle in both is intensified by the presence of a woman as hostage/prize. Both feature aging Hollywood stars at or near the end of thir careers, and both climax in the heavily symbolic arena of a ghost town. The difference in quality between both films can be seen in the contrasting stature of their stars - Gary Cooper was one of the great icons of the Western, and a potent projection of America's self-image - his face scarred with age, and body wracked with cancer added to the phantom surroundings to create a genuine, austere, end-of-the-genre atmosphere. Robert Taylor, a matinee idol, brings no such baggage with him - void of iconic presence and resonance, 'Law' seems comparatively shallow.

The film is still terrific entertainment, particularly in its second half, with the tensions within bad guy Richard Widmark's crew threatening violence; a fierce Indian raid, with the best-ever use of arrows in a Western, seeming to swoop down from a great distance at the viewer; and the long, mythical shoot-out. The film's characters and themes develop predictably - Taylor, who wants to rejoin civilisation by working as a lawman and marrying the daughter of a rich capitalist, must exorcise his violent, blood-stained past - and there are the usual homoerotic and Oedipal complications. There are interesting inflections - the crew's criminal activities are seen as extensions of their 'legal' duties as soldiers during the Civil War; while Taylor is one of the genre's more dim-witted heroes, a plan dodge a pursuer by taking convoluted by-ways is foiled by the fact that he has given the pursuer his horse - all Widmark has to do is let him go and follow him!; the great ritual of (moral) rebirth is cynically set in a ghost town's cemetary.

What is most interesting about the film is its visuals. Sturges may lack the true intellectual rigour of a Mann or Boetticher, both of whom he imitates, but there is a compositional care in 'Law' absent from his more famous blockbusters. The widescreen patterning of characters against the landscape contributes to the film's meaning, and often works against the script; the central interior scene, as kidnappers and abductees wait for a Commanche attack, is like a very skip of civilisation. Although the relation between individual and landscape is not telegraphed, there are three brilliant Boetticher-like shots when the camera tracking Taylor slowly descends, levelling the ground and revealing the impassively monumental mountains behind him, exposing both his lack of solidity and a natural world indifferent to his fate. There is hardly a shot of a character that is not in some way framed by its environment; the disorienting mix of breathtaking location shots and deliberate backdrops furthers the theme.

4-0 out of 5 stars A nearly classic
Taylor and Widmark are a good team in this classic western. They also have very good supporters, like Robert Middleton in the cast. One of the great films by John Sturges. ... Read more


6. Hell to Eternity
Director: Phil Karlson
list price: $14.98
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 6301802411
Catlog: Video
Sales Rank: 4896
Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars
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Reviews (5)

4-0 out of 5 stars I too would like to clear a couple of things up...
This movie is about an American in the Pacific War. This American has a special history or relationship with the Japanese, and his adoption by a good Japanese-American family, the effect of Pearl Harbor on himself and that family, and his experience of the Japanese he has both lived-with and had to fight against on Saipan Island battle are what make this above-average Pacific-war saga based on US Marine Guy Gabaldons personal story and war experience a little different from the run of the mill genre. Good supporting-cast with David Jansen, his gambling and broads loving buddy whose luck runs out finally on Saipan, sadly.
This man Guy Gabaldon would proudly agree with my description of him as an American, Im pretty-confidant.This movie is about Americans and Japanese,
its not about Germans, or Polish people,
or Swedes, or Russians,
or Italians,
or British or Irish or even, would you believe,and this may be more than you can handle, but its not about wonderful Spanish or Mexican people, or modern race-politics in the US and trivial PC touchiness, its about an American Marine and the Japanese.
I tell you this as a non-American myself, if I can see it, so should practically anybody else.

5-0 out of 5 stars Set the record straight
I would like to point two things out.

In "Hell to Eternity" although Jeffery Hunter's character should have been depicted as a Mexican-American and should have been portrayed by one (Anthony Quinn comes to mind), the truth is, his character was depicted as a Italian-American portrayed by a classically white Western European (Jeffery Hunter).

In the years prior to "Hell to Eternity" being made, in California, the home of Hollywood, the agricultural industry expereinced a work shortage and recruited illegal immigrants to pick up the slack. Later during the time "Hell to Eternity" was made they became a burden to deal with and President Eisenhower ordered them rounded up in "Operation Wetback" and sent them back to Mexico. Additionally, during the making of "Hell to Eternity" the rise of the United Farm Workers took place and even though the UFW was a positive force for change for the Mexican-American community, others (bigots and racist) saw the union as an infernal trouble maker. Hence, it was unfashionable and politically incorrect for Hollywood to depict or portray either Mexican or Mexican-Americans as heroic figures let alone the subject of a major motion picture. Consequently, circumstances being what they were (prejudice, bigotry and selective memory and history), artistic license was used as an excuse to deviate from the actual true story. The result was an untrue and inaccurate depiction in a movie that was supposed to be about a true Mexican-American hero, Guy Gabaldon, a hero that the Mexican-American community has been deprived of celebrating for many decades now.

My second point is that, with the recent popularity of war movies these days, since 1960 when this movie was made, there never has been an attempt to right this wrong and depict and portray the true story of Guy Gabaldon, the true Mexican-American hero of this movie. Hollywood continues to focus exclusively on white heros of our wars in their movies to the detriment of our country's diverse history.

The movie should be remade with a Mexican-American playing the role of Guy Gabaldon (Esia Morales comes to mind) and should be more accurately told rather than sensationally and selectively told.

4-0 out of 5 stars Hell To Eternity: Hatred Is A Three-Edged Sword
Most movies about the Second World War either deal with brave men performing heroically as expected or less heroic men doing the unexpected. In HELL TO ETERNITY the focus is on a man who is neither brave nor cowardly. He is no Henry Fleming dreaming of great exploits. Rather he is a man driven by hate for the same people whom earlier he had once called his own. He is Guy Gabaldon, a real life U. S. Marine who won several decorations for valor fighting the Japanese on Saipan.
The movie begins with Gabaldon as a boy living in a troubled street in Los Angeles. He is homeless, friendless, and more than a little filled with rage at a world that has no place for a poor boy of mixed Hispanic origin. A Japanese family sees worth in him, and much as Don Corleone did with Tom Hagen in THE GODFATHER, agree to take him in and raise him as one of their own. The adult Gabaldon is played by Jeffrey Hunter, who has the uneviable task of playing Gabaldon at varying times in a psychologically varying condition. Gabaldon learns to speak fluent Japanese and his face beams with delight as he addresses his adopted matriarch as 'Mama-san.' Life in the United States is indeed sweet, at least until Pearl Harbor, when he is swept up into the maelstrom of war. He does not relish the thought of fighting his adopted people, and he suffers greatly from the image of shooting at Japanese soldiers. During his initial introduction to training, he is befriended by a pre-Fugitive David Janssen, who shows him the ropes of being a soldier. Gabaldon learns to count on Janssen as a soldier, a friend, savior. During a vicious battle, Gabaldon sees Janssen gunned down right in front of him, and at that point, his world view is turned upside down. He now hates the Japanese with a ferocity that amazes even his friends. He uses his fluency in Japanese to lure them out of their lairs, and he guns them down by the hundreds. His hate drives him on until he meets a Japanese officer played by the immensely dignified Sessue Hayakawa, whose personal bravery restores Gabaldon's emotional equilibrium.
HELL TO ETERNITY is the rare war movie whose focus on killing is not to showcase either the fighting skills of the individual soldier or to build a national sense of patriotism and warlike fervor. Instead, director Phil Karlson uses the confusing images of war to mirror the equally confusing turmoil of one man who is called on to shift mental gears once too often.

4-0 out of 5 stars The Marine who inspired the movie Hell To Eternity
Hell to Eternity depicts an unconventional manner of battling the enemy. A young Marine utilizes his foreign language skills in Japanese that he learned from his adopted family to influence and convince the enemy to surrender. This is a great WWII movie that shows a humanistic point of view of the war in the South Pacific.
This movie was insipred by a real-life Marine, Guy Gabaldon , a Mexican-American Marine from East Los Angeles. PFC Gabaldon " Maverick Marine" was credited with the capture of 1500 Japanese soldiers. He was initially awarded the Silver Star then later upgraded to the Navy Cross. Efforts have been made to petion for him to be awarded the Congressional Medal of Honor.
More interesting reading can be found in Guy Gabaldon's autobiography book "Saipan, Suicide Island".

4-0 out of 5 stars Life is a struggle and war is hell, a different perspective
Hell to eternity is a touching film, Jeffrey Hunter plays a young man with a poor home life who is adopted by a Japanese family prior to WWII. He is surrounded by people decrying the "japs" and endures a struggle of conscience. The only goodness and kindness he has ever experienced in his life was the gift of this Japanese family. His adopted family is placed in a relocation camp and his adopted brother proudly goes off to fight for the U.S. but he is left to struggle with his identity. He eventually does go to fight for the U.S. It is nice to see a different perspective, not all "Japs" are bad, war is never easy and a person must make a moral choice. ... Read more


7. Sayonara
Director: Joshua Logan
list price: $19.98
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 6301670132
Catlog: Video
Sales Rank: 26850
Average Customer Review: 4.75 out of 5 stars
US | Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France | Japan

Reviews (28)

5-0 out of 5 stars Wonderful love story, great acting, beautiful scenery.
This movie was nomiated for Best Picture, Best Actor(Marlon Brando), Red Buttons won Best Supporting Actor. Very moving love story, Brando is an Air Force pilot who is sent to Japan to rest up during the Korean War. He meets a Japanese actress (who hates Americans) and falls in love. The background is beautiful, some big stars had roles in this film. Brando is wonderful, as well as his co-stars.

5-0 out of 5 stars An under seen masterpiece!
When I mention the film Sayaonara to anyone who likes a good flick, the first thing they say is "never heard of it". Then I lend it to them and and they are simply speechless! Sayonara is a film that made such a strong impression on me the first time I saw it some 15 years ago, that I never forgot it and till this day I can recall the dialogue, scenery, and characters like it was yesterday. This film has always been a favorite of mine. I have a soft spot for a well made epic love story and the plot of a G.I. in a foregin land falling for a mysterious and beautiful woman. Then the realization of both characters knowing that their love may not be possible and may cause nothing but anguish and harm is simply amazing and heart felt! This film is up there with the "Love Is A Many Splendored Thing" (AND THAT MOVIE IS AMAZING!!!) as a total tear jerker. The scene where brando must follow Japanese custom and remove his shoes in his lovers house for the first time is just an all around exhale of human emotion. I cry till this day and can't wait to cry over the film in a more clearer transfer of the characters facial expressions of their emotions on screen-a CLASSIC!

5-0 out of 5 stars Sayonara
This is Brando at his very best. I loved this movie from beginning to end. It is sentimental without being sappy, it is simply a great love story without any of the modern day 'scenes'. Red Buttons is simply superb, along with James Garner. Marlon was able to do the southern accent seemingly without any variation. This movie was excellent from beginning to end and left me feeling extremely happy to have a copy. The Japanese actresses fit the roles without exception. Would recommend this movie to anyone who loves a great love story with an exceptional ending

5-0 out of 5 stars Watch it for this one scene, if nothing else.
This is a well done, enjoyable, and interesting film, and those qualities make it worth watching, but there is one scene in this film that is a high example of the filmmaker's art. This scene, in its perfection, is the most powerfully romantic movie scene I have ever beheld. This scene transcends story telling with film; it is literature.

It evokes thoughts of something from Madame Bovary (Gustave Flaubert), or Anna Karenina (Leo Tolstoy). That is to say, the scene portrays something vital about the human experience. At least it does for me; but then, I admit I'm a sucker for stories of love between American men and Asian women.

The scene to which I refer is when Lloyd Gruver (Marlon Brando) encounters Hana-ogi in Joe Kelly's (Red Buttons) house. It begins when he opens the sliding door and sees her kneeling, erect, serene, and dignified, waiting for him to arrive. If not on the first watching, then on the second, fourth, or eleventh watching, one will become aware that the lighting, the sound, the furnishings of the room, her hair, her kimonos, her makeup (especially her painted lips) are all perfect. What an ambiance! What a setting for a man and a woman to fall in love!

Gruver is immediately struck by her presence; this is plain to see. Nevertheless, he recovers his usual demeanor and proceeds to try to make small talk, his mind and body regarding this lovely creature with respect and admiration, but also lust. She just sits there, regarding him without moving, without even blinking, betraying no thoughts or emotions. His discomfort rises.

Then, when it is time and not before, she begins to speak. She speaks word of deep humanity, compassion, wisdom, and sincerity. The power of her words is greatly enhanced by the quiet dignity with which she speaks them. Gruver is dumbfounded, and Brando plays this role very well. You can see on his face (Flaubert or Tolstoy would have painted the picture with words) that his life, unexpectedly, has just been bifurcated. There is now the life before this encounter, and what will come after. He can never again be the same man. He can never again regard women the same. Hana-ogi is a new paradigm, and his lust, far from being extinguished, has maybe even been elevated, but is now part of an ethereal, not just corporeal experience. He never looked for such a thing before, because he never imagined such a woman or such a feeling could exist.

This scene is for me the climax of the film, and if the story ended there, it would be satisfyingly complete. The purpose of the rest of the story is to set the table for this connection between two immortal souls. Nevertheless, what goes before, and what ensues is still interesting and worthwhile.

Some people continue to insist such love themes are racist. That is absurd. It is the antithesis of racism. This is the profoundest love flourishing in spite of different races and cultures, and the inevitable perils incumbent with this relationship in this place at this time. This is love between a man and a woman, as unfettered by affectations and expectations as love can be. This is the raw, real thing.

Your humble correspondent was raised as far from the Enchantment of the East as one can get, and like the protagonists of this story had no expectation of being enchanted when I first traveled there. But, through experience, I can attest the irrepressible bond this film portrays between the lovers is real, and is not exaggerated. Also, the perils are real, although nowadays not the same ones.

I have been in love in Japan, China, and Southeast Asia-married once among these encounters. When a man knows love in the East, he may also know tragedy, but he'll know he's alive. This film tells this tale, exquisitely done.

5-0 out of 5 stars I love this film
I`ve seen this movie many times on cable and am always charmed by it.The delightful way the japanese women talk and Brando`s southern accent and dialogue is both charming and funny.James Garner and Red Buttons both give great supporting performances.This film will make you laugh and tug at your heartstrings.Recommended. ... Read more


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