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1. Romeo and Juliet
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2. Dream Team
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3. Romeo and Juliet (Widescreen Edition)
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4. The Verdict
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5. Theater of Blood
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6. Barbarella
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8. Opportunity Knocks
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9. Sacco & Vanzetti
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10. The Matchmaker
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11. Ulysses
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13. Angel in Green
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16. Once a Hero
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17. The Verdict
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18. The Matchmaker
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19. The Angel Levine
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20. The Playboys

1. Romeo and Juliet
Director: Franco Zeffirelli
list price: $9.95
our price: $9.95
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 6300216039
Catlog: Video
Sales Rank: 695
Average Customer Review: 4.61 out of 5 stars
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Reviews (142)

5-0 out of 5 stars A sumptuous Renaissance feast!
Franco Zefirrelli's 1967 film was revolutionary in using teenaged actors to play the two most famous lovers of all literature. Olivia Hussey is heartbreakingly beautiful, a vulnerable and courageous Juliet, while Leonard Whiting's poetic good looks make him a sensitive and appealing Romeo. Zefirrelli's career as an opera director is put to spectacular use here--each scene is meticulously crafted to be an exact replica of the Renaissance. Stunningly beautiful clothing, jewels, furniture, food, glass, sculpture--it is an overwhelming feast for the eyes. The preserved medieval towns of Tuscany, and the lovely Borghese palace where the balcony scene is set, give the film the look of an animated Renaissance painting. Zefirrelli took some liberties with Shakespeare's original script for the sake of brevity, but unless you are a die-hard purist, this is a minor flaw. I saw this film a dozen times in the theater, and never without the sound of girls weeping by the end--I was often one of them. Leslie Howard was a better actor, and Leonardo DiCaprio/Clare Danes more modern, but if you love beauty, this is THE quintessential Romeo and Juliet on film. END

5-0 out of 5 stars Zeffirelli's Quintessential Version! Every Aspect Excellent!
This is THE must see version of Romeo and Juliet. Zeffirelli's 1968 masterpiece stars 17-year-old Leonard Whiting and 15-year-old Olivia Hussey with great music by Nino Rota. Filmed "on location" in Italy this version also has the fingerprints of the 1960s all over it, from moddish long hair, the debut of Michael York as Tybalt, John McEnery as Mercutio, the lush balcony scenes, the nude scene, and an emotional intensity throughout. McEnery brings just the right comic touch to the comi-tragedy and screenwriters Franco Brusati, Maestro D'Amico, and Zeffirelli keep true to Shakespeare with a take on the story that's easily accessible to a wide audience, thereby making this one of the most popular films of the '60s.

Especially effective is the ambiguity of intent of the Tybalt-Mercutio duel, and the overall editing of dialogue just enough to keep it succinct and believable yet retain the poetic and philosophical virtuosity of the playwright's playwright. The music is used effectively and as it rises during the love scenes it's a manipulation that's an enhancement to rather than distraction from the emotion--a rare successful pull-off of this. And that balcony scene is extraordinary, the lush dark atmosphere, Romeo's giddiness, Juliet's beauty...I believed it.

Milo O'Shea (who later played the Judge in "The Verdict") does a believable Friar Laurence and Robert Stephens (I)(with a long list of Shakespearian roles to his name) an intensely serious Prince of Verona. It's hard not to fall in love with Olivia (watch for her new film role as Mother Theresa).

Some bits of trivia: Before 1968 Romeo and Juliet was not generally taught in US high schools and this film's popularity changed all that as most of you reading this had it in high school. Michael York turned down the role of Oliver in Love Story--one may read into this he felt it was a poor man's Romeo and Juliet...just a thought. Also Olivia Hussey briefly dated Prince Charles. And here's the clincher: Paul McCartney got the original offer to play Romeo. I'm glad he turned it down, as Whiting is perfect here. And for those who wonder, the story did not originate in historical fact, though one may wish it so. The story came from mythical legend starting in 5th century Greece, later evolving into "The Tragical History of Romeus and Juliet" translated into English in 1562 by Arthur Brooke and originally written about 1530 by Luigi da Porto., 'til Shakespeare got a hold of it (circa 1594) and breathed into it the life that will last as long as humanity does most probably.

This towers over the 1st film version with a 34-year-old Norma Shearer and a 43-year-old Leslie Howard, and as for the 1996 mess sorry guys; American accents, present day gang violence, over-the-top overacting, LA locales, and Leonard DiCaprio do not great Shakespearean tragedy make. This 1968 one is the one to see over and over.

5-0 out of 5 stars Excellent movie...Great actors
Watching this as part of a highschool assignment, the teacher only allowed us to watch about 15 minutes of it. When I saw it playing on cable, I sat down to finish it. This, I must say, is the best version of Romeo and Juliet. In the '68 version The actors are young and even though it was made in '68, you can relate to them in this day. The acting is superb, no one better could have been picked for the parts. It was a real tearjerker. Not to mention the soundtrack...the songs were just amazing to hear. Just watch the movie once, you'll fall in love with it.

5-0 out of 5 stars The Defintive R & J
I could watch this version of Romeo and Juliet over, and over, and over. The performances are dead on, especially John McEnry's turn as Mercutio (you understand the reason why he's killed off: people would have cared more about him than about the tragic heroes if he'd been around too much longer!). I would advise teachers, however, that this is not the first version they show students of the show. While most ninth graders read this play, the giggling that can abound in a classroom watching Romeo in tights often distracts from the meaning of the film.
So, for with the exception of ninth graders, this is the Romeo and Juliet to see.

5-0 out of 5 stars Zeffirelli and Shakespeare: A Perfect Match
There is nothing worse than bad Shakespeare but not to worry here-- Franco Zeffirelli and Shakespeare come together here in a lavish, opulent production of ROMEO AND JULIET, just when we thought there was nothing fresh to say about them. Zeffirelli has broken new ground by casting Leonard Whiting, who is 17, and Olivia Hussey, who is all of 15 but looks even younger, in this timeless classic story about "star-crossed" lovers. With the possible exception of some parts of the musical score-- although much of it soars-- this film is as good today as it was when first released in 1968. (The musical theme was beautiful the first 50 times I heard it on the radio. Then it became trite.)

There are no bad actors here. In addition to the two lovers, Michael York as Tybalt and Pat Heywood as the nurse give outstanding performances, just to name two. My only negative comment about the acting is that Romeo always seems to run to and from an event or meeting; he never walks. Perhaps that is what a seventeen-year-old, testosterone-laden lad does, however. On the other hand, Romeo and Juliet's tragic story is completely believable and will put chills on your spine. Additionally, the dance scenes and duel scenes are quite wonderful. The wardrobe department got everything right as well.

A word about the language-- it goes without saying that Mr. Shakespeare is and ever shall be the greatest writer in English. Hearing his words again is a transcendent experience. ... Read more


2. Dream Team
Director: Howard Zieff
list price: $19.98
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: B000005XXZ
Catlog: Video
Sales Rank: 3140
Average Customer Review: 4.74 out of 5 stars
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Reviews (19)

5-0 out of 5 stars Nothing quite like four crazies on the streets of New York!
This movie is hilarious. Michael Keaton, Peter Boyle, and Christopher Lloyd all give career comedy perfomances. The whole idea of four totally crazy psychiatric patients roaming the streets of New York looking for their doctor is great. Michael Keaton is perfect as the leader of the group who's view of reality is way off. Peter Boyle is great as the former executive Jesus Christ messiah. Christopher Lloyd's character (the patient who thinks he's a doctor) adds the perfect spice to the movie to make a great two hour film. I can't wait until the DVD comes out.

5-0 out of 5 stars One of the funniest movies ever made
A side-splitting comedy about four mental patients: Michael Keaton as a habitual liar who has violent tendencies, Christopher Lloyd as an obsessive-compulsive who thinks he runs the hospital, Peter Boyle as a former advertising executive with a messiah complex who likes to take his clothes off, and Stephen Furst as catatonic couch potato. Against the wishes of the hospital administration, their compassionate doctor takes the four patients to New York City to watch a major league baseball game. When the van reaches the city, the doctor has to exit the van - with patients still inside - only to witness a murder committed by two corrupt cops. The doctor is attacked by the cops, leaving him hospitalized and unable to help his patients. The patients then find themselves framed for the murder. Now the patients have to not only act "sane" to prove their innocence, they also have to save the life of their doctor who is still a target of the two cops.

What makes this movie work is the relationship of the patients. It is so much fun watching Keaton, Lloyd, and Boyle bicker all the time about the littlest things. Boyle has a really funny scene in which he leaves the van while Lloyd tries to block him. Boyle then muscles his way past Lloyd, tells him that He shall have no false gods before Him, and finally he tells Lloyd to get out his way before calling him a seven-letter word. There might only be so much you can do with a catatonic character, but Furst is quite memorable. Even though the doctor must have the patience of a saint when dealing with them, he probably has a harder time suppressing a laugh. Quite simply, this is a movie that gets better every time you watch it.

5-0 out of 5 stars the second best movie about schizos ever!
this movie is awesome,but borrowed heavily from one flew over the cuckoos nest.4 mental patients are taken on an outing and thier doc gets mugeed.they wander about new york for the next few days.the 4 are:michael keaton with a low frustration tolerance-he beats people up a lot over anything,2-the crazy doc from back to the future as guy who is convinced hes a dr.3-a guy who thinks hes jesus christ and finaly,a chubby little man who only communicates in baseball terminology.children wont understand this but its pretty harmless.it is the second best movie starring mental patients ive ever seen.it is sad in one spot but it goes past quickly.keatons girlfriend is not all that sexy.but i guess you cant be picky when youre an escaped schizo.the guy who acts like a dr is obnoxious with his by the book attitude.michael keaton however does an excellent job in this one.its his best performance.there is a mess up in the film.at the hospital,the real dr has aq cast on a foot of his.later yet,he is helped out of a van with the cast on the other foot.a great film.

5-0 out of 5 stars What would happen if four insane men were loose in NYC?
This story is a creative, hilarious story about 4 insane men loose in NYC, trying to solve a crime. They find that they can behave in a relitively sane manner and they learn how to work as a group. It is extremely funny. A must see!

5-0 out of 5 stars "Ah, It's Great To Be Young And Insane" - Michael Keaton
The Dream Team is just another one of those killer comedies that no one went to see when it was originally released, but has now found a nice following on home video. I actually saw the film in theaters and thought it was hands down the funniest movie of the year!

First you have a great comedy ensemble who also can play drama just as effectively. Michael Keaton is Billy Caufield ("I'm an escaped mental patient with a history of violence"), Christopher Lloyd is Henry Sikorsky, an overly organized person ("Why don't we bring this up in group? Or maybe we should just hug?"), Peter Boyle is Jack McDermott who has a Messiah complex ("Arise and walk, my son"), & Stephen Furst is Albert Ianuzzi, who only speaks in TV ads and baseball jargon ("Nobody doesn't like Sara Lee").

If you don't already know by now, these guys are four mental patients, whose doctor, played by Dennis Boutsikaris ("One more afternoon in the rec room and I'm gonna have to go on Thorazine myself"), decides to take them to a baseball game in New York. Only things don't go as planned, as the good doctor ends up getting knocked unconscious and whisked away to a hospital, leaving his patients all alone on the streets of New York City. And the comedy ensues! As the gang tries to figure out a way to find their doctor, they end up finding "themselves" in the process. Add Lorraine Bracco (of "Goodfellas" and "The Sopranos" fame) as Keaton's girlfriend ("So am I walking home with an escaped mental patient or what?") and you know you're set to have a good time.

What makes the film memorable is that it has the perfect blend of laugh outloud humor ("We're a special combat unit with the United States Marine Corps and we've been tracking some Libyan terrorists. In fact I think we've got 'em trailed to a bagel shop around the corner.") combined with some tender dramatic moments, that work together seamlessly.

The DVD is your typical standard DVD. No extras, other than the original theatrical trailer. Happily the film is presented in Anamorphic Widescreen in its original aspect ratio of 1.85:1, which looks pretty good. A little dark in some spots, but not too much to complain about.


So if you're looking for a comedy that's full of great laughs as well as a good story with some dramatic moments thrown in for good measure, pick up The Dream Team today. It's the sanest choice to make!

The Dream Team - a very funny movie.

Henry - "We're directly under the Hudson River now".

Billy - "Yeah. You guys see those tiles up there, all those individual tiles? Doc, isn't true that if even one of those tiles were to come loose, like millions and millions of gallons of water would come pouring down on us and crush us like tiny little bugs? (pauses) Is that a leak up there? You see those tiles? They're leakin' water! Oh, my God!"

Jack - "I will hold back the waters".

Billy - "Thanks, Jack". ... Read more


3. Romeo and Juliet (Widescreen Edition)
Director: Franco Zeffirelli
list price: $9.95
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 6304145217
Catlog: Video
Sales Rank: 26201
Average Customer Review: 4.61 out of 5 stars
US | Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France | Japan

Reviews (142)

5-0 out of 5 stars A sumptuous Renaissance feast!
Franco Zefirrelli's 1967 film was revolutionary in using teenaged actors to play the two most famous lovers of all literature. Olivia Hussey is heartbreakingly beautiful, a vulnerable and courageous Juliet, while Leonard Whiting's poetic good looks make him a sensitive and appealing Romeo. Zefirrelli's career as an opera director is put to spectacular use here--each scene is meticulously crafted to be an exact replica of the Renaissance. Stunningly beautiful clothing, jewels, furniture, food, glass, sculpture--it is an overwhelming feast for the eyes. The preserved medieval towns of Tuscany, and the lovely Borghese palace where the balcony scene is set, give the film the look of an animated Renaissance painting. Zefirrelli took some liberties with Shakespeare's original script for the sake of brevity, but unless you are a die-hard purist, this is a minor flaw. I saw this film a dozen times in the theater, and never without the sound of girls weeping by the end--I was often one of them. Leslie Howard was a better actor, and Leonardo DiCaprio/Clare Danes more modern, but if you love beauty, this is THE quintessential Romeo and Juliet on film. END

5-0 out of 5 stars Zeffirelli's Quintessential Version! Every Aspect Excellent!
This is THE must see version of Romeo and Juliet. Zeffirelli's 1968 masterpiece stars 17-year-old Leonard Whiting and 15-year-old Olivia Hussey with great music by Nino Rota. Filmed "on location" in Italy this version also has the fingerprints of the 1960s all over it, from moddish long hair, the debut of Michael York as Tybalt, John McEnery as Mercutio, the lush balcony scenes, the nude scene, and an emotional intensity throughout. McEnery brings just the right comic touch to the comi-tragedy and screenwriters Franco Brusati, Maestro D'Amico, and Zeffirelli keep true to Shakespeare with a take on the story that's easily accessible to a wide audience, thereby making this one of the most popular films of the '60s.

Especially effective is the ambiguity of intent of the Tybalt-Mercutio duel, and the overall editing of dialogue just enough to keep it succinct and believable yet retain the poetic and philosophical virtuosity of the playwright's playwright. The music is used effectively and as it rises during the love scenes it's a manipulation that's an enhancement to rather than distraction from the emotion--a rare successful pull-off of this. And that balcony scene is extraordinary, the lush dark atmosphere, Romeo's giddiness, Juliet's beauty...I believed it.

Milo O'Shea (who later played the Judge in "The Verdict") does a believable Friar Laurence and Robert Stephens (I)(with a long list of Shakespearian roles to his name) an intensely serious Prince of Verona. It's hard not to fall in love with Olivia (watch for her new film role as Mother Theresa).

Some bits of trivia: Before 1968 Romeo and Juliet was not generally taught in US high schools and this film's popularity changed all that as most of you reading this had it in high school. Michael York turned down the role of Oliver in Love Story--one may read into this he felt it was a poor man's Romeo and Juliet...just a thought. Also Olivia Hussey briefly dated Prince Charles. And here's the clincher: Paul McCartney got the original offer to play Romeo. I'm glad he turned it down, as Whiting is perfect here. And for those who wonder, the story did not originate in historical fact, though one may wish it so. The story came from mythical legend starting in 5th century Greece, later evolving into "The Tragical History of Romeus and Juliet" translated into English in 1562 by Arthur Brooke and originally written about 1530 by Luigi da Porto., 'til Shakespeare got a hold of it (circa 1594) and breathed into it the life that will last as long as humanity does most probably.

This towers over the 1st film version with a 34-year-old Norma Shearer and a 43-year-old Leslie Howard, and as for the 1996 mess sorry guys; American accents, present day gang violence, over-the-top overacting, LA locales, and Leonard DiCaprio do not great Shakespearean tragedy make. This 1968 one is the one to see over and over.

5-0 out of 5 stars Excellent movie...Great actors
Watching this as part of a highschool assignment, the teacher only allowed us to watch about 15 minutes of it. When I saw it playing on cable, I sat down to finish it. This, I must say, is the best version of Romeo and Juliet. In the '68 version The actors are young and even though it was made in '68, you can relate to them in this day. The acting is superb, no one better could have been picked for the parts. It was a real tearjerker. Not to mention the soundtrack...the songs were just amazing to hear. Just watch the movie once, you'll fall in love with it.

5-0 out of 5 stars The Defintive R & J
I could watch this version of Romeo and Juliet over, and over, and over. The performances are dead on, especially John McEnry's turn as Mercutio (you understand the reason why he's killed off: people would have cared more about him than about the tragic heroes if he'd been around too much longer!). I would advise teachers, however, that this is not the first version they show students of the show. While most ninth graders read this play, the giggling that can abound in a classroom watching Romeo in tights often distracts from the meaning of the film.
So, for with the exception of ninth graders, this is the Romeo and Juliet to see.

5-0 out of 5 stars Zeffirelli and Shakespeare: A Perfect Match
There is nothing worse than bad Shakespeare but not to worry here-- Franco Zeffirelli and Shakespeare come together here in a lavish, opulent production of ROMEO AND JULIET, just when we thought there was nothing fresh to say about them. Zeffirelli has broken new ground by casting Leonard Whiting, who is 17, and Olivia Hussey, who is all of 15 but looks even younger, in this timeless classic story about "star-crossed" lovers. With the possible exception of some parts of the musical score-- although much of it soars-- this film is as good today as it was when first released in 1968. (The musical theme was beautiful the first 50 times I heard it on the radio. Then it became trite.)

There are no bad actors here. In addition to the two lovers, Michael York as Tybalt and Pat Heywood as the nurse give outstanding performances, just to name two. My only negative comment about the acting is that Romeo always seems to run to and from an event or meeting; he never walks. Perhaps that is what a seventeen-year-old, testosterone-laden lad does, however. On the other hand, Romeo and Juliet's tragic story is completely believable and will put chills on your spine. Additionally, the dance scenes and duel scenes are quite wonderful. The wardrobe department got everything right as well.

A word about the language-- it goes without saying that Mr. Shakespeare is and ever shall be the greatest writer in English. Hearing his words again is a transcendent experience. ... Read more


4. The Verdict
Director: Sidney Lumet
list price: $9.98
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 6301599896
Catlog: Video
Sales Rank: 11095
Average Customer Review: 4.89 out of 5 stars
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Amazon.com essential video

In this 1982 courtroom drama written by David Mamet and directed by Sidney Lumet, Paul Newman found the perfect role for a transitional period of his stellar career. As alcoholic Boston lawyer Frank Galvin, Newman shook off his screen persona as a handsome, blue-eyed hunk to portray an aging, weary man whose best years are behind him, with a shot-glass future that looks very bleak indeed. But when Galvin is given a chance to redeem himself--by proving medical negligence in the case of a comatose woman--he makes one final effort to regain his self-respect and tarnished reputation. He's an underdog against formidable odds, facing a powerful, politically connected lawyer (James Mason, slick as ever) who will do anything to win his case, regardless of professional ethics. Further complicating matters is a woman (Charlotte Rampling) who only appears to be worthy of Galvin's trust and love, until Galvin's best friend and colleague (Jack Warden) proves otherwise. Excellent as both courtroom drama and riveting character study, the film crackles with Mamet's sharp dialogue; and Lumet's direction is a brilliant example of forceful restraint. The film gave Newman one of the best roles of his career; many felt he deserved the Oscar (he lost to Ben Kingsley in Gandhi) that would belatedly be given to Newman for The Color of Money. Along with Hud, Cool Hand Luke, and Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid, The Verdict ranks highly as a signature performance by one of America's all-time greatest actors. --Jeff Shannon ... Read more

Reviews (37)

5-0 out of 5 stars An outstanding courtroom drama
I agree with the other reviewers that Paul Newman gives the best performance of his career in this intense, well-designed film. There are numerous scenes which are shown without a cut, providing the viewers with an uninterrupted examination of the actors' interactions. Some include (without giving away too much): Newman's character (Frank Galvin) in conflict with the judge's actions toward the court proceedings, Newman and Warden preparing for the trial and the circumstances weighing heavily against them.
All the supporting actors are excellent. Among the noteables: James Mason as the powerhouse defense attorney with a malicious underhand, Milo O'Shea as the unsympathetic judge, Jack Warden as Newman's friend, mentor, and seemingly sole supporter, Charlotte Rampling as Newman's girlfriend with a shady side to herself.
There are a few plotholes and moments of overly dramatic "courtroom hysterics" within the film. Overlook them and enjoy an otherwise very strong movie.

5-0 out of 5 stars The Very Best of Its Genre
Simply put there is no American film of this genre that comes close. Director Lumet darkly captures the naked power and corruption of the American civil trial system. Actors O'Shea (the judge), Mason (the 'prince of darkness' defense counsel) and Charlotte Rampling (whose shock is best left unrevealed) are the epitome of the seedy wheels of what passes for justice and 'love'. Newman, an alcoholic with one last prospect, struggles for redemption against mountainous odds, giving the most honest performance of his career. Warden is Newman's essential wiser alter ego. This film is no less than that rare cimematic device -- the allegory. Each character represents a larger truth -- in addition to Mason, O'Shea, and Rampling, Joe Seneca as a black, ancient (degraded) doctor for the vegetative plaintiff; Catholic archidiocese bishop Ed Binns up to his collar in fraud; a nationally-renowned physician with secret blood on his hands; and a simple honest woman who wanted nothing more than to be a nurse - Lindsay Crouse in a career performance. And there is the superb Mamet writing throughout. This is a courtroom thriller that will nail you to your seat to the very end. And absolutely true to life -- my view, at least, after 20 years as a lawyer. I also teach law and never miss a chance to show this film to my students. An amazing cinematic achievement, disturbing in its implications.

5-0 out of 5 stars A grand film of triumph over failure
This film is one of the best in Paul Newman's stellar career, and he carries it convincingly with a spare, taut, no-frills performance. His Frank Galvin, an alcoholic has-been attorney with a bleak future is a defeated and pathetic figure, reduced to appearing at funeral homes during visitation hours to hustle business from bereaved family members. Even when long-time friend Mickey Morrissey [Jack Warden] hands Galvin a lucrative case on a silver platter, his star witness disappears to an unknown Caribbean island after having promised to testify against the hospital and Catholic Church for malpractice. Galvin's determination to see the case through is the first step to his recovery from the bottle and self-pity. The comatose woman's sister and brother-in-law who he represents in court have lost confidence in Galvin, he seems overmatched by the glib and polished Ed Concannon [James Mason] who represents the interests of the Church, and he has incurred the wrath of a biased, mean-spirited judge [Milo O'Shea]. To make matters worse, his girlfriend Laura [Charlotte Rampling] is little more than a Trojan horse in the Galvan camp and her true intentions come to light only after Mickey stumbles on the truth quite by chance. The movie was filmed under Boston's gray, overcast skies and has a gloomy forecast for Galvin in his quest for redemption and reward for a man who has been defeated by life but makes one last attempt to get off the deck and regain his self-respect and stature in his profession.

3-0 out of 5 stars the film lets down the star
THE VERDICT is one of Paul Newman's most celebrated performances. He plays a down-at-the-heels lawyer named Frank Galvin who lucks his way into a big case involving two doctors who have been horribly negligent, sending a young woman into a coma.
Newman wonderfully gets at Galvin's desperation, and how he fights through an alcoholic haze. It's a thoughtfully worked out performance centered around Newman's wonderfully expressive eyes. Sadly, the rest of THE VERDICT could be taught in a Courtroom Movie Cliche 101 class. The lone lawyer vs the big firm (led by James Mason), altered documents, surprise witnesses, shenanigans by the hospital, it's all here. Even though I enjoyed the acting and the Boston atmosphere, I saw a lot of the plot coming.
The cast includes Jack Warden as Newman's only friend, Joe Seneca, Lindsay Crouse, Wesley Addy, and a chilly Charlotte Rampling as a mysterious woman who crosses Newman's path. The commentary by director Sidney Lumet is of the "everybody was great/this is where we shot" variety.

5-0 out of 5 stars A Monumental Cinematic Treasure
THE VERDICT may date back to 1982, but few courtroom films since then can come close to matching the powerful production in this near perfect film written by David Mamet and directed with tension, grit, and tenderness by Sidney Lumet. Paul Newman's performance as the alcoholic has-been lawyer called upon to try a case of medical malpractice is one of the finest acting performances in history. He is more than ably abetted by his sidekick Jack Warden. The lawyer for the defense is the haughty and evil James Mason and the real surprise in the cast is Milo O'Shea in a terrifyingly real role of a smarmy Judge. Charlotte Rampling, still one of today's finest actresses, plays the understated love interest. Minor roles become major when they are in the hands of such gifted actors as Lindsay Crouse and Julia Bravasso. But one unsung hero of this fine film is the cinematographer who manages to make every shot appear like a Renaissance painting, so sensitive is he to light and shadow and frame composition.

THE VERDICT is a powerful story of the underdog's struggle for truth in the judicial system and as such is a reminder of how the Law, when stripped to its essentials, is there to protect us. There is no pat ending, only a feeling of breathlessness as all of the details of the story are left to our imagination - well, almost. A strikingly powerful, meaningful, brilliantly executed film. ... Read more


5. Theater of Blood
Director: Douglas Hickox
list price: $14.95
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 6301977270
Catlog: Video
Sales Rank: 25400
Average Customer Review: 4.64 out of 5 stars
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Reviews (14)

4-0 out of 5 stars Vincent Price knocks 'em dead!
Vincent Price is Edward Lionheart, an aging and failed Shakesperean actor who is driven to the edge (of a building) when he is denied a vaunted stage-critics award in this darkly hilarious classic. Thought dead after an apparent suicide attempt witnessed by that circle of persnicketty critics - including the late-great Robert Morley - Lionheart survives and returns to exact a cruel revenge on his "enemies". Using an actor's mastery of disguise and improvisation, and knowing of his enemies weaknesses, Lionheart takes each critic out one by one. Resorting to ever elaborate means of murder - each suggested by works of Shakespeare - Lionheart deprives the British stage of one critic at a time, outwitting the surviving critics and the team of crack detectives sent to protect them. If you're thinking "waituminit - this is like one of those 'Phibes" movies, you're not off the mark. Unlike either of the Phibes movies, "Blood" is set in present day (okay, the 1970's!!) London and adds heaping spoonfuls of funky - witness Price as an afro-coiffed hair stylist!! And speaking of spoonfuls, I'm not even going to say explicitly what devilish and ironic end he saves for Morley's corpulent character. (The beauty of this flick is that you know what's going to happen - it's like a slow-mo car wreck). Between this flick, the Hammer films and "Psychomania", my (then) young mind envisioned London as a city of monsters and psychotics in love with its reputation for the macabre - no less enjoyable because I actually caught this movie while vacationing there. If you're a Price fan, or are just in the mood for some acid-tipped fun, this is your flick.

4-0 out of 5 stars Slaying the Critics
Hammy Shakespearean has-been Edward Lionheart (Vincent Price) threw himself into the Thames from a hotel balcony a couple years back, in despair over losing the coveted Critic's Circle Best Actor award. Now the critics who denied him the prize are dying horrible deaths, each death an ironic contrivance of a gory murder from one of Shakespeare's plays. Who but Lionheart has a motive? After all, they never found his body. Then again, his daughter (Diana Rigg) isn't any too fond of those particular critics either...

This is a great little mid-1970s Vincent Price shocker, made hot on the heels of his success in the Doctor Phibes movies and containing the same kind of quaint horrific charm and macabre humor. The slain critics are all played by famous British character actors, and the fun comes in spotting Price (and Rigg) in various theatrical disguises and attempting to second-guess which murder from which play is going to be applied to which obnoxious critic. Julius Caesar, Romeo and Juliet, Richard III, Henry VI Part I, Othello, and The Merchant of Venice all come into play. The best murder is from Titus Andronicus, to which Robert Morley succumbs, in a manner that simply has to be seen to be believed. One of the nasty fates in King Lear is reserved for chief critic Ian Hendry, as the piece de resistance - who manages the last laugh himself, in an unforgettable parting line.

Lovers of mysteries, horror films, macabre comedies, Vincent Price movies, or Shakespeare plays will have the time of their life with this one. So will any actor, who won't be able to resist a morbid chuckle at the skillful dispatch of so many nasty, obnoxious critics.

5-0 out of 5 stars a critical bloodbath
This is any entertainer's ultimate fantasy. The power to kill critics who you feel ruin your reputation and deny you legitimacy. Edward Lionhart {played by Price} was a ham actor on the theatre circuit who loved the works of Shakespeare so much that he devoted his career to various salutes and tributes to the playwright. London's top critics felt Lionhart wasn't being too original and they became annoyed at his Shakespeare tributes and so they always gave him terrible reviews simply because they wanted him to take the hint and do something other than Shakespeare. Well, Lionhart felt he deserved the Critics Circle Award but the critics gave it to a newcomer over legendary Lionhart. This prompted him to jump from a multi-story complex and be presumed dead. He comes back to life and aided by his demented daughter, the two kill the eight of the nine critics who were the most insensitive with their reviews. Each critic is killed using the murders from the Shakespeare plays they respectively panned by Lionhart. for example, in one play a hapless victim eats his own flesh and blood (Robert Morley appears as a homosexual critic who is force fed poodle soup...his character didn't have any children and so his two poodles were the closest thing he had to "family"). Another death came when Price plays 'Butch', a gay hairdresser who electrocutes furture wife, Coral Browne. This film is hilarious and it has two messages. The first: critics DO have power over public opinion and it's often their take on a movie, play, or record album that often persuades the public into investing their time or money into something. Second: no matter how personal and how awful a review might be, the offended party shouldn't kill his/her attackers. Ignoring bad reviews and denouncing the critics as dummies is the proper way to handle pious critics. Seek out this film and enjoy Lionhart's happiness in getting his revenge. The critics are so cynical and full of themselves that you have no sympathy for them {however, you will have pity for the one likable critic who is tasting wine and is drowned by Lionhart and dunked into a wine barrel}

5-0 out of 5 stars Edwin the Lionheart slices them up just as they deserved!
One of my favorite movie themes are tales of revenge. Perhaps it is because I have felt wrong so many times and would give anything to "repay favors." Another is the systematic elimination of a group of people, with the reader/viewer wondering who will be killed next and how. Call this second the Ten Little Indians theme popularized by Agatha Christie.

Theater Of Blood evokes both themes, taking the revenge theme of The Abominable Dr. Phibes, also starring Price, further, in terms of gore and violence. The tale of Edwin Lionheart, a hammy theater actor who seeks revenge after the critics who denied him the Critics Circle Award for Best Actor. He murders them in the manner of deaths performed in Shakespeare's plays. To this end, he is assisted by a group of drunks, billed as the Meth Drinkers, who obey their master and relish the killings as much as he. Vincent Price excels himself in the role of Lionheart and for this, he deserves a positive award of some kind.

Ian Hendry plays the harried head of the Critics Circle, Peregrine Devlin, Diana Rigg plays Lionheart's daughter Edwina, and Milo O'Shea (Duran Duran in Barbarella), plays Inspector Boot. Other familiar British faces include veteran actor Michael Hordern, Arthur Lowe (No Sex Please We're British, Dad's Army, Bless Me, Father) and Dennis Price (The Lavender Hill Mob, The Magic Christian) in one of his last films--he died the same year as the movie's release. John Morley, another veteran, plays a critic who is more than a bit camp, never without two poodles in his arms. Joan Hickson, who plays the wife of one of the critics, is seen here not only thinner but with red hair. A sharp contrast to her best known role as Miss Marple. British sexpot Diana Dors makes an appearance, still sensuous. And Coral Browne, who plays the critic Miss Moon, became Vincent Price's third and last wife, remaining with him until her death in 1991.

Contrary to Maltin's review, the gory killing do not adversely affect the movie in any way. Okay, the movie is macabre, but there are moments of humor in at least two of the killings. The first is my favorite scene, involving the decapitation of Mr. Sprout (Arthur Lowe) a la Cymbelline. He is executed with Lionheart and his assistant playing surgeons. The rubber sheet placed around When Lionheart repeats his command, to which the assistant finally hands him the basin. I expected the theme from Dr. Kildare to be played, but even better, some easy listening one expects in a love scene. Lionheart rolls his eyes and shakes his head. The head rolls off, causing his wife to scream. The maid recovers, only to see the head staring at her, eliciting another hysterical scream. Mr. Sprout's head goes through one final destination, and that I won't give away to the viewer.

The second involves the aftermath of a killing done a la Othello. Lionheart, affecting a thick accent, tells the constable, "Officer, if I am not mistaken, Mr. Saltery is murderin' his wife." To which the constable casually thanks Lionheart, who leaves, accompanied by a score of corny shopping mall muzak. Precious!

The recurring theme by Michael J. Lewis, played adds to the movie's ambience,

One tiny error is the shot of Lionheart carrying Edwina on top of the theater roof in the film's last moments. There is an close aerial view of the dark-haired scalp of Vincent Price's stuntman.

I reacted to Devlin's last words in the movie in the same way the inspector looked at him. After all that, hasn't he learned the words Lionheart spat at him during their fencing duel?

"How many actors have you destroyed? You destroyed me! How many talented lives have you cut down with your glib words? What do you know of the blood, sweat, and toil of a theatrical production? Of the dedication of the men and women in the noblest profession of all? How could you know, you talentless fools? You spew vitriol on the creative efforts of others because you lack the ability to create yourselves?"

The above does give credence to the well known statement that critics are failed writers or performers. Look what Joseph Goebbels ended up as.

In the flashback scene, it is revealed that Lionheart claimed the prize despite not getting it and had crashed the post-awards party at Devlin's house to get the statuette. Edwina also arrives and brings her father to his senses, ("You're only helping them to hurt you more.") and as he recites "To be or not to be..." on the balcony of, the critics mocked him. The cold-hearted bastards needed killing, all right. Small wonder Lionheart chose Hamlet as a pre-suicidal soliloquy before jumping. Lionheart, you've told it like it is!

5-0 out of 5 stars I loved it!
One of the best films Vincent Price has ever done. Greatly directed by Douglas Hickox. This movie is about a terrible crazed Shakespearean actor (Vincent Price) who gets repeated bad notices by a circle of critics. When the annual Critic's Award comes around this actor is sure he will win. Fully aware of this the critics go out to crush his ego by giving the award to some one else. Because of this it sets a homicidal rage within the actor, and he goes after them one by one in Shakespearean ways. This movie is a masterpiece that should be treasured. ... Read more


6. Barbarella
Director: Roger Vadim
list price: $14.95
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Asin: 6300216047
Catlog: Video
Sales Rank: 7770
Average Customer Review: 4.28 out of 5 stars
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Amazon.com essential video

Jane Fonda's memorable, zero-gravity striptease during the opening credits of this 1968 Roger Vadim movie is the closest the film comes to a liberated marriage of wit and sex. Based on a French comic strip, the story concerns the adventures of a 41st-century woman, who pretty much gets it on with whomever asks. The sci-fi sets were pretty interesting at the time, though they look rather anachronistic now. Appreciated today mostly as a camp classic, the movie is actually more trying than anything else. --Tom Keogh ... Read more

Reviews (50)

4-0 out of 5 stars Funny, Intentionally-Horrid Camp / Cult Sci-Fi Flick
Jane Fonda may regret opting Barbarella as one of her earlier films, but fans of bad camp and cult sci-fi are happy to see the actress in this horridly funny sixties film.

Fonda plays the title role of a spaice vixen / astronaut in the exceptionally distant yet sixties-fied future. When genius but mad scientist Dr. Duran Duran (presumably from whom the band took their name) disappears, Barbarella is sent to track him down and given weapons she has no clue how to use (war has been outlawed for ages) and little warning of the planet she'll be landing on.

Pursued by evil children with cannibalistic dolls and rescued by a tough man in furs, Barbarella finds out about real sex (thankfully not pictured) when she offers to use a mood-linking pill, the 41st century method of copulation. From there she's off to a city of evil, avarice, and sin, to be caught by the demented Dr. Duran and put through such tortures as a cage of pecking budgies to the doctor's notorious and sensual machine for execution by sheer pleasure to a lake of liquid evil whose effects look to have been done by lava lamp. Along the way she meets various helpers (most of whom she ends up sleeping with), including a blind angel named Pygar.

Barbarella's costumes vary with each scene, all skin-tight and definitely satirizing the garb of women of golden-age science fiction. On the whole, the movie pokes fun at the field of early science fiction rather well with a heaping helping of sixties hippie culture thrown in for good measure. The DVD doesn't include any exceptional special features.

Barbarella is by no means a good movie, but it is excellent fare for fans of campy sci-fi that would be right at home on MST:3K and quite humorous when taken with a grain of salt.

4-0 out of 5 stars The hottest hottie ever?
Okay, so these days Jane Fonda is weird, which is entirely understandable given that she is married to Ted Turner, who can often be found snoozing during Braves games, wearing a cap 3 sizes too big for his head. But in "Barbarella," Jane Fonda is unbelievably hot, to the point where I questioned whether this movie was real or a mere figment of my fantastical imaginations. Well, it's real, people, and you need to see it. Not only is Jane utterly flawless (which can be easily seen by comparing her to today's "hot" stars like Britney Speers, Jennifer Love Hewitt, and Denise Richards), she also invites every male character in the film to basically have his way with her. Um, waiter, check please? But seriously, we cannot be supporting this type of wanton behavior (primarily for the reason that the women who act this way in the real world look more like George Forman than Jane Fonda), so this type of vision is best left to the campy comedy known as "Barbarella." I am 21, mind you, so I am not biased towards the 60's, but I am telling you not to miss out on the world's perfect female--watch it.

4-0 out of 5 stars A trip
This movie is a trip. In spite of what agenda-driven, right-wingers have to say about it, based on their personal dislike for Jane Fonda and her oppinions of the Vietnam war, this movie is a true classic. It's campy to a point that it makes you think how serious, pragmatic and booring people have become over the past decades. It's a total groovie trip. It doesn't take itself seriously at any moment. And best of all, it actually has lines to read between.

1-0 out of 5 stars Hanoi Jane in her best role
The only movie she ever made that I can sit through.

1-0 out of 5 stars Ban Jane Fonda
Read up about her role in the Vietnam War before giving her your patronage. ... Read more


7. Ulysses
Director: Joseph Strick
list price: $19.98
our price: $16.99
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: B00004W1AR
Catlog: Video
Sales Rank: 31700
Average Customer Review: 4.25 out of 5 stars
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Description

Adapted from the brilliant novel by James Joyce, "Ulysses" portrays a stream-of-consciousness day in the life of Leopold Bloom, Molly Bloom, and Stephen Dedalus (the hero of Joyce's earlier autobiographical novel, "A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man"). Bloom is an ordinary man, a Jew whose odyssey through the streets of turn-of-the-century Dublin leads him through trials that parallel his classic prototype, Ulysses, on his epic journey home. Molly is his voluptuous, delightfully earthy wife whose infidelity is a major burden Bloom must bear. The intimacy of Joyce's language was without precedent in literature, and its flashbacks, dream episodes, sounds and visual montages translate freely into the language of cinema. ... Read more

Reviews (4)

5-0 out of 5 stars Whose Afraid of James Joyce?
AN EXCELLENT transfer from novel to film [to pristine DVD]!
This semi-intellectual excursion into the world of sexual frankness [THAT that final monologue about intimacy ...!]bordering on pornography - but always avoiding the issue .... along the lines of "What did He/She say?" or "Run that by me again".

This is a perfect example of the 'voice-over' film - images matched to the continuous 'stream of consciousness' - oddly set in the mid-sixties .....

The performances are uniformly excellent and the mood of brooding Dublin during THAT day - well set.

Quite timeless - especially the miscommunication between the sexes .....

5-0 out of 5 stars Joyce when you don't have time for the book
Wonderful visualization of the basic plotline. Yes, the book does have a plot. Filmed in Dublin, so you see the towers, river, and streets. The production is done with love, for those who couldn't imagine life without this book.

5-0 out of 5 stars An excellent representation of some aspects of Joyce's novel
Joyce's ULYSSES is one of the great works of literature of this century -- it is also a difficult novel to read. Most readers need help and there are various guidebooks available for this. Another way of accessing the novel is by listening to oral interpretations of it on tape or record or by watching Strick's excellent film tribute to the book. Of course, it could not be possible to get that whole massive work into a couple of hours film -- I doubt that Strick ever intended to. But this film is an excellent introduction to the book, one that I would recommend warmly.

2-0 out of 5 stars video serves a purpose, but...
AFter having read Joyce's novel, I thought that seeing a movie version of it would be interesting. In that case, I was correct. However, I believe the book was poorly represented. It is hard to capture a 66 page stream of consciosness dream sequence with film. It was an interesting idea, but... ... Read more


8. Opportunity Knocks
Director: Donald Petrie
list price: $9.98
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 630176305X
Catlog: Video
Sales Rank: 23193
Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars
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Reviews (5)

5-0 out of 5 stars This is a GREAT movie no one knows about !! GET IT !!
"Opportunity Knocks" is a cute, funny movie. I have this movie and without a doubt, it's one of my favorites. It is Dana Carvey's first "starring" role as something other than a Saturday Night Live character and he is excellent. This movie never got the accolades it deserved (perhaps not enough press coverage). This movie is MILES above "Clean Slate" (Dana's second movie). I have felt for years that this movie was a wonderful little secret that only I and a few others in the world knew about. Dana really shines here. If you like Dana Carvey...if you like really funny, sweet little movies...if you have a sense of humor and like a good laugh - buy this movie, PLEASE. I want to share it with you !!

5-0 out of 5 stars This is a GREAT movie no one knows about !! GET IT !!
"Opportunity Knocks" is a cute, funny movie. I have this movie and without a doubt, it's one of my favorites. It is Dana Carvey's first "starring" role as something other than a Saturday Night Live character and he is excellent. This movie never got the accolades it deserved (perhaps not enough press coverage). This movie is MILES above "Clean Slate" (Dana's second movie). I have felt for years that this movie was a wonderful little secret that only I and a few others in the world knew about. Dana really shines here. If you like Dana Carvey...if you like really funny, sweet little movies...if you have a sense of humor and like a good laugh - buy this movie, PLEASE. I want to share it with you !!

4-0 out of 5 stars Great movie, bad actress!
This movie is one of Carvey's best! He's very charming and as always funny. You can't help but start to love his charecter. It was an excelent movie, and I would give it a full 5, if it wasn't for Eddie's (Carvey) love intrest. I don't know if the charecter was played out perfectly, and it wasn't that interesting. Or the actress, Julia Campbell, didn't give it her best. She seemed very boring, and in many ways wrong for the part, and the guy. Other than that, this is an excelent film!

5-0 out of 5 stars The Carvey Review
A great movie, one of my favorites! Carvey does excellent acting and the karaoke scene is pure gold! Dana Carvey should consider acting again.

5-0 out of 5 stars Dana Carvey's best film
Dana Carvey plays a small time conman named eddie whos about to hit the big leagues. He breaks into a house and is mistaken for the housesitter. That's when the movie takes off. He has to play it cool to keep his cover and not let the girl he loves know he is a fraud. ... Read more


9. Sacco & Vanzetti
Director: Giuliano Montaldo
list price: $9.99
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 630577112X
Catlog: Video
Sales Rank: 42592
Average Customer Review: 2.6 out of 5 stars
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Reviews (5)

5-0 out of 5 stars VHS & DVD
why cannot I find Sacco & Vanzetti in DVD format?

2-0 out of 5 stars GREAT TALE, BUT A CRIME IT'S SO POORLY TOLD
"It happened before ... it can happen again!" Or so says the copy on the box. Gee, we hope not. The story of Nicola Sacco and Bartolomeo Vanzaetti -- avowed anarchists who could not prove their whereabouts the day a shoe factory was robbed in South Braintree in which two men were murder and so were charged, tried and convicted -- has inspired (almost) as much copy as Monica and Bill's "crimes." Great tale, tepid flick. But we love Joan Baez warbling the title track.

3-0 out of 5 stars A GOOD REMINDER
Anyone with a true interest in what makes America tick should have more than just a passing awareness of the Nicola Sacco and Bartolomeo Vanzetti case. Edmund Wilson was quite accurate when he said in 1928 that the case "raised almost every fundamental question of our political and social system." And this movie is a good place to start picking up that knowledge. And the more informed may welcome the chance to see the famous events played out.

Here is the skeleton of the story, all taking place a few miles south of Boston: As a result of some bad luck, the two Italian anarchists are picked up, May 5, 1920, for questioning about one of their comrades, Mike Boda. Boda is a suspect in a double murder and robbery at South Braintree on April 15, 1920 and an attempted robbery at Bridgewater on December 24, 1919. Upon their arrest, Sacco and Vanzetti lie to the police and generally act guilty, thereby presenting themselves as suspects. Both are tried and convicted of the capital crime in the summer of 1921. World-wide protests gradually build, engineered at first by defense attorney Fred H. Moore and later by the Communists, until the marches and embassy attacks reach a crescendo with the tragic execution of two on August 23, 1927.

I believe this movie is too close to a documentary to be compelling drama and too one-sided and with a few too many errors to be a satisfying documentary. After all, we know at the outset the two will end up in the chair, so why the many minutes of courtroom action? It seems as if it is to discredit Moore, for he is shown antagonizing Judge Thayer over and over. Some of this did occur early in the actual trial and Thayer did hate Moore, but Moore soon turned over most of the examining to his co-counsel. Also, the movie shows several intemperate outbursts by Moore. They never happened but again serve to make him the patsy and to blame for the conviction. This isue with Moore has been a long standing party line. The truth is Sacco and Vanzetti were convicted ninety percent because the jury and especially the judge had their minds made up before the trial, and ten percent because the attorneys did not have the time or money early on to mount a really good defense.

I believe a better treatment would be to present the tragic case through the eyes of one of the minor characters, such as Sacco's wife Rosina, and so dig more into the personal lives of the players. The story needs the John Sayles touch. By the way, Rosina is shown as sympathetic to Moore, which could not be further from the truth.

Since actual transcripts are used for some dialogue, it is surprising how many errors of fact creep in for no good reason. The moviemakers seem just too intent upon propaganda. For example, there were two men on a motorcycle with S & V the night they were arrested, not three. They were Boda and Orciani. And they did not see Mrs Johnson on the telephone at her neighbor's; they only saw the telephone wires. These boo-boos do not serve any purpose. But one that does is the oft-repeated falsehood about Vanzetti's speech at his sentencing - "good shoemaker and poor fish peddler, etc." The truth is easily found in the literature.

The movie is quite effective in showing the horrors of capital punishment, though not as good as THE MONSTERS BALL.

Personally, I believe Sacco and Vanzetti were both innocent, and there is still a movie to be made to dramatize that fact and more closely to relate their tragedy to the current day's injustices, using only the truth.

2-0 out of 5 stars Turn about is fair play
SACCO AND VANZETTI is not a terribly good movie, but it provides an interesting object lesson for American viewers. Although Hollywood has never had any compunction about turning the whole world's history into a highly Americanized struggle between good and evil, foreign films about America's past are pretty rare. If for no other reason than to see how another society views us, films like S&V are worth watching. The fact that the film dramatizes one of our less enlightened moments makes it that much more interesting.

I don't know enough about the Sacco and Vanzetti trial to assess the film's treatment of it, but the filmmakers certainly make no effort to conceal their prejudices. Given when it was made (1971), at the height of Radical Chic, it is hardly surprising that they indict the system that condemned the two Italian-American anarchists. Both are portrayed as helpless innocents. Riccardo Cucciolla's Sacco particularly exudes the saintly aura of all New Left victims. The director, Guiliano Montaldo, is no Pontecorvo or Bertolucci or Rosi. He doesn't have the gift of making leftist politics ravishingly beautiful, but he's a competent hypester who knows how to keep things jumping. He's helped considerably by Gian Maria Volonte's powerful presence as Vanzetti. (Volonte is probably best known to American audiences for his villainous performances in the first two Leone/Eastwood spaghetti westerns, first as Ramón, Eastwood's chief antagonist in FISTFUL OF DOLLARS, then as Indio, the psychopathic bank robber in FOR A FEW DOLLARS MORE. He was also the lead in Elio Petri's INVESTIGATION OF A CITIZEN ABOVE SUSPICION.)

I don't know where S&V was shot. At a guess, probably Italy and England. With one or two exceptions, there isn't a location in it that feels remotely like Massachusetts, but that's what makes the film fascinating. It may be wildly inaccurate--but what does that say about American movies set in other countries? If we assume that the people who made this are serious, talented individuals (and why doubt it?), then we have to conclude that the distortions we pick up in an American subject merely reflect similar distortions Hollywood imposes on the rest of the world. Or, to put it differently, there is no reason to believe that Italians have a monopoly on short-sighted, provincial visions of other countries. Remember that the next time you watch an American movie about World War II and all the Germans speak English with German accents.

1-0 out of 5 stars Strictly for Seattle radicals (all others need not apply).
This movie is in black and white (better still, in black and red!) and I don't mean colorwise. It's your standard politically-correct hagiography where good guys ooze beatitude, bad guys reek evil, and if you don't root for the former, you belong with the latter. Like history told this way? If so, then you're gonna love it; if not, at least you'll get some laughs.

Mind you, it's not that I object the fake look, dubbed dialogue, hammy overacting or holier-than-thou attitude of everyone concerned in this dated political flick from the sixties; I mean, we were all pretty much ridiculous ourselves back then. But Joan Baez's awful lyrics and worst wailing tear apart the movie's only redeeming asset: Ennio Morricone's beautiful music score. Now that's a true crime!

So you've been warned! ... Read more


10. The Matchmaker
Director: Mark Joffe
list price: $14.95
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 6304766742
Catlog: Video
Sales Rank: 23601
Average Customer Review: 4.42 out of 5 stars
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Amazon.com

As she does in The Truth About Cats and Dogs, Janeane Garofalo proves she's a capableleading lady--beautiful, charming, self-effacing, and what used to be referred to as sharp as a tack.Garofalo plays Marcy, aide to dim Massachusetts senator McGlory (Jay O. Sanders). Denis Leary isappropriately slimy as a fellow aide. The senator and Nick dispatch Marcy to the remote (and fictitious)Irish town of Ballinagra, where she's supposed to unearth relatives to use in the senator's PR campaign. Along the way, Marcy not only encounters the eccentric locals, but finds herself in the maelstromof the town's annual matchmaking festival. The single Marcy inadvertently catches the eye of the movie'seponymous matchmaker Dermot (a captivating Milo O'Shea). Dermot senses sparks between Marcy andthe equally cynical, recently returned local boy, Sean (David O'Hara), once a successful journalist who'sreturned home to work on a book. The intimacies of the small town, the relationships between the locals, and the dialogue are credible and engaging. Look for beautiful cinematography and music, too. Also notable is the movie's ability to convey the feel of a foreign film while injecting humor that's both sarcastically American and yet Irish in trademark. --N.F. Mendoza ... Read more

Reviews (81)

5-0 out of 5 stars Not The Quiet Man, Thank God
Someone called this movie a romantic comedy for people who don't like romantic comedies, and I think that's pretty accurate. The story of a hapless senator's aide (Garafalo) who is shipped to Ireland to search out Irish relatives (bogus or otherwise) of her dim boss, it is refreshingly funny, cynical and lighthearted. While there are, of course, some of the Irish stereotypes and cliches to be found, they are presented in a very sly, acidic, tongue-in-cheek manner, and some of the digs at tourists are particularly funny. The characters are charming, from the matchmaker(s)to the Kelly brothers who run one of the local hotels/pubs. David O'Hara is a find as a romantic leading man--no pretty boy but very sexy--and Jeananne Garafalo makes a great, offbeat romantic foil for him. The scenery is beautiful (it's Ireland, after all) and the dialogue very funny and, at times, touching. Even Murphy, the dog, is funny (note especially the scene in the home of the crusty and anti-tourist Aran Islander). In sum, this movie has some of the best comedic scenes I've seen and some of the most endearing characters as well. Highly recommended for light viewing.

4-0 out of 5 stars Refreshingly different romantic comedy
The Matchmaker is a romantic comedy with a twist - it has an orginal premise, funny characters, truly comic moments, and the leads look like real people, which only adds to their appeal.

Janeane Garaofalo, as the U.S. Senator's aide visiting a coastal Irish village during their annual matchmaking fair, is funny and caustic. David O'Hara, as the seemingly n'er do well bartender who turns out to have a bit more going for him, is sexy as all get out, without looking anything like a Hollywood pretty boy.

The two stars have great chemistry and timing with each other, and the supporting cast is excellent. The only false notes are sounded by Dennis Leary, who overacts a bit as the obnoxious Senator's aide, and the character of the Senator himself, who is too much of a caricature. Milo O'Shea brings a poignancy to the key Matchmaker role that could have easily sunk into a stereotype.

This film has some very funny moments, with one of the best being a desperate car ride by O'Hara and his brother, both sporting full leg casts and trying in vain to pilot a stick shift.

All in all, you could do worse than to spend a couple of hours with "The Matchmaker". It left me smiling, as well as wanting to see more of O'Hara in future lead roles.

4-0 out of 5 stars a sweet little sunday afternoon type of movie
having visited Ireland and flown into Shannon airport like Janeane Garofalo does at the beginning of this movie,it is a favorite.the scenery is beautiful,Janeane is adorable. i absolutely love the scene when she judges the singing contest!this movie is something you can simply enjoy-let it take you away to Ireland,its beautiful there!

5-0 out of 5 stars Worthy of a Deluxe Turbo Tan!!
Bollix to those of you who don't like this movie! It is filled with quirky off center humor and constantly had me asking, "Did I really just hear that?" As a very pale caucasion myself, I related particularly well to the various jokes about the lack of pigment in the Emerald Isle. Anyone who's ever been set up on a blind date will find the matchmaking humor particularly entertaining as well. The charachters are wild and eccentric, but entirely lovable. This is one of those movies that leaves you feeling warm fuzzys, and is not to be missed. Even if you end up hating it, I recommend that you watch it and decide for yourself.

2-0 out of 5 stars A Disappointment
This movie has beautiful scenery of Ireland but beyond that I can't recommend it. The acting is weak and the story hard to believe. There is a lot of offensive language that isn't really necessary to the story. The film never held my attention but did make me want to visit such a beautiful country. ... Read more


11. Ulysses
Director: Joseph Strick
list price: $29.98
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 630350454X
Catlog: Video
Sales Rank: 24370
Average Customer Review: 4.25 out of 5 stars
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Reviews (4)

5-0 out of 5 stars Whose Afraid of James Joyce?
AN EXCELLENT transfer from novel to film [to pristine DVD]!
This semi-intellectual excursion into the world of sexual frankness [THAT that final monologue about intimacy ...!]bordering on pornography - but always avoiding the issue .... along the lines of "What did He/She say?" or "Run that by me again".

This is a perfect example of the 'voice-over' film - images matched to the continuous 'stream of consciousness' - oddly set in the mid-sixties .....

The performances are uniformly excellent and the mood of brooding Dublin during THAT day - well set.

Quite timeless - especially the miscommunication between the sexes .....

5-0 out of 5 stars Joyce when you don't have time for the book
Wonderful visualization of the basic plotline. Yes, the book does have a plot. Filmed in Dublin, so you see the towers, river, and streets. The production is done with love, for those who couldn't imagine life without this book.

5-0 out of 5 stars An excellent representation of some aspects of Joyce's novel
Joyce's ULYSSES is one of the great works of literature of this century -- it is also a difficult novel to read. Most readers need help and there are various guidebooks available for this. Another way of accessing the novel is by listening to oral interpretations of it on tape or record or by watching Strick's excellent film tribute to the book. Of course, it could not be possible to get that whole massive work into a couple of hours film -- I doubt that Strick ever intended to. But this film is an excellent introduction to the book, one that I would recommend warmly.

2-0 out of 5 stars video serves a purpose, but...
AFter having read Joyce's novel, I thought that seeing a movie version of it would be interesting. In that case, I was correct. However, I believe the book was poorly represented. It is hard to capture a 66 page stream of consciosness dream sequence with film. It was an interesting idea, but... ... Read more


12. Only the Lonely
Director: Chris Columbus
list price: $9.98
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 6303394051
Catlog: Video
Sales Rank: 1498
Average Customer Review: 4.25 out of 5 stars
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Reviews (12)

4-0 out of 5 stars A forgotten movie that shouldn't be. O'Hara steals the show.
This movie has all the makings of a winner. A plot that is identifiable to almost any moviegoer, (everybody knows somebody in this situation.)A cast consisting of a fine comic lead, good supporting characters and two Hollywood legends. And a script that fits each actor like a glove.

John Candy pleases in this low key role of a lonely police officer tied too tight to his mother (O'Hara) who has very strong opinons about almost everything and who plays the mother guilt card like no other as he is pursuing his interest in an equally lonely lady (Sheedy). I watched this with my own mother who is O'Hara's age and saw her nodding in agreement all over the film. (until her full blooded Siclian fists clenched when O'Hara's character described us. The look on her face was worth the price of the movie alone.)

The story is plesant and worth your money, Candy & O'Hara work well together (who would have thought she would outlive him!) but the real power of the film is her interaction with Anthony Quinn. Classic film buffs like myself will get a real charge out of Quinn once again persuing O'Hara, but this time without an Errol Flynn as a rival. That sub plot is at least as interesting as the main one and for my money is better. It is classic Maureen O'Hara, the strong woman who is chased by the strong man and frankly is a great contrast to the the exact opposite situation between Candy & Sheedy.

In the end to nobodys surprise love conquers all and Candy's final immagined scene (contrasting with several ones eariler in the film) gives him closure. That final scene is my favorite and show O'Hara playing a character she has always excelled at. Considering the events of 9/11/01 the ending has even more meaning as we see a member of "The Greatest Generation" setting an example (albert a fictious one) that would be bravely followed in reality 10 years later.

I've said little about the good performances by Sheedy and Belushi, not to mention several other supporting characters in minor roles, they all add to the picture, but the stars make this film. Buy it.

4-0 out of 5 stars Subtle comic role really allows John Candy to shine
John Candy turns in a wonderful performance as Chicago police officer Danny Muldoon, in his late-30s and still living with his mother. He tries to pursue a relationship with a young girl working as a makeup artist in a funeral home, but his Irish mother won't seem to let go. Quite a charming story, with a few jolts coming from Danny's imagined fears of his mother being harmed when he's not there for her. The way Chicago is represented is hit-or-miss, possibly due to licensing issues for some of the more well-known Chicago images (most notably, the Chicago policeman's uniform and the design of the Chicago squad car), but those flaws notwithstanding the movie still has a Chicago feel to it. There actually are still a few remaining store-front funeral homes in Chicago, and of course the plentiful Irish pubs are captured perfectly. Probably the unheralded star of the movie is old Comiskey Park, which for 80 years was the home of the Chicago White Sox. The filming took place after the final baseball game was played there in 1990 (and a few months before its fateful date with the wrecking ball), and the first-date picnic on the playing field was a wonderful and touching sendoff for the old park. After going to many White Sox games there since age 5, it sure was nice to see the fireworks from the scoreboard one last time!

4-0 out of 5 stars When is This Going to get to DVD?
I have always liked this movie. I liked Only the Lonely when I saw it in a movie theater and I liked it when I watched it on HBO. I even taped it off of HBO but taped over it and I now regret doing that. I think this is a cute movie and I think John Candy, Anthony Quinn and Maureen O'Hara were wonderful even though her character was so mean. Also good are Milo O'Shea, Ally Sheedy and the rest of the cast and being Irish-American I loved the Irish and Irish-American characters and I loved the love story with John Candy and Ally Sheedy's characters and I think they had some great chemisty and I would love to see Only the Lonely transferred to DVD in a nice widescreen edition!

2-0 out of 5 stars Silly film, but Candy is enjoyable
A spinster who makes up corpses to look like movie stars and a cop who lives with his overbearing mother. A match made in heaven? Maybe, but there wasn;t much chemistry between Ally and John here. His mother does a good job and the neighbor nearly steals the film. not something to go out of your way to see.

5-0 out of 5 stars I saw the Movie on Pax tv.
I saw the movie on Pax tv, channel 16 here in Salt Lake City and it was very good. I like Maureen O'hara, she played in Miracle on 34th Street, I have that video. I am going to order Only the Lonley because it is very moving and entertaining, I thought that it was interesting when Maureen O'Hara "Tells it like it is" to John Candy's girl friend and almost ruins their plans for getting married. ... Read more


13. Angel in Green
Director: Marvin J. Chomsky
list price: $14.98
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 6302362873
Catlog: Video
Sales Rank: 64060
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14. Medicine Hat Stallion
Director: Michael O'Herlihy
list price: $69.99
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Asin: 6302035538
Catlog: Video
Sales Rank: 30606
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15. Ellis Island
Director: Jerry London
list price: $79.98
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Asin: 6300163997
Catlog: Video
Sales Rank: 22211
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16. Once a Hero
Director: Kevin Hooks, Win Phelps, Harry Hurwitz, Paul Schneider, Kevin Inch, Claudia Weill
list price: $14.99
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Asin: 6302247128
Catlog: Video
Sales Rank: 53063
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17. The Verdict
Director: Sidney Lumet
list price: $6.98
our price: $6.98
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Asin: B000063UVB
Catlog: Video
Sales Rank: 13734
Average Customer Review: 4.89 out of 5 stars
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Reviews (37)

5-0 out of 5 stars An outstanding courtroom drama
I agree with the other reviewers that Paul Newman gives the best performance of his career in this intense, well-designed film. There are numerous scenes which are shown without a cut, providing the viewers with an uninterrupted examination of the actors' interactions. Some include (without giving away too much): Newman's character (Frank Galvin) in conflict with the judge's actions toward the court proceedings, Newman and Warden preparing for the trial and the circumstances weighing heavily against them.
All the supporting actors are excellent. Among the noteables: James Mason as the powerhouse defense attorney with a malicious underhand, Milo O'Shea as the unsympathetic judge, Jack Warden as Newman's friend, mentor, and seemingly sole supporter, Charlotte Rampling as Newman's girlfriend with a shady side to herself.
There are a few plotholes and moments of overly dramatic "courtroom hysterics" within the film. Overlook them and enjoy an otherwise very strong movie.

5-0 out of 5 stars The Very Best of Its Genre
Simply put there is no American film of this genre that comes close. Director Lumet darkly captures the naked power and corruption of the American civil trial system. Actors O'Shea (the judge), Mason (the 'prince of darkness' defense counsel) and Charlotte Rampling (whose shock is best left unrevealed) are the epitome of the seedy wheels of what passes for justice and 'love'. Newman, an alcoholic with one last prospect, struggles for redemption against mountainous odds, giving the most honest performance of his career. Warden is Newman's essential wiser alter ego. This film is no less than that rare cimematic device -- the allegory. Each character represents a larger truth -- in addition to Mason, O'Shea, and Rampling, Joe Seneca as a black, ancient (degraded) doctor for the vegetative plaintiff; Catholic archidiocese bishop Ed Binns up to his collar in fraud; a nationally-renowned physician with secret blood on his hands; and a simple honest woman who wanted nothing more than to be a nurse - Lindsay Crouse in a career performance. And there is the superb Mamet writing throughout. This is a courtroom thriller that will nail you to your seat to the very end. And absolutely true to life -- my view, at least, after 20 years as a lawyer. I also teach law and never miss a chance to show this film to my students. An amazing cinematic achievement, disturbing in its implications.

5-0 out of 5 stars A grand film of triumph over failure
This film is one of the best in Paul Newman's stellar career, and he carries it convincingly with a spare, taut, no-frills performance. His Frank Galvin, an alcoholic has-been attorney with a bleak future is a defeated and pathetic figure, reduced to appearing at funeral homes during visitation hours to hustle business from bereaved family members. Even when long-time friend Mickey Morrissey [Jack Warden] hands Galvin a lucrative case on a silver platter, his star witness disappears to an unknown Caribbean island after having promised to testify against the hospital and Catholic Church for malpractice. Galvin's determination to see the case through is the first step to his recovery from the bottle and self-pity. The comatose woman's sister and brother-in-law who he represents in court have lost confidence in Galvin, he seems overmatched by the glib and polished Ed Concannon [James Mason] who represents the interests of the Church, and he has incurred the wrath of a biased, mean-spirited judge [Milo O'Shea]. To make matters worse, his girlfriend Laura [Charlotte Rampling] is little more than a Trojan horse in the Galvan camp and her true intentions come to light only after Mickey stumbles on the truth quite by chance. The movie was filmed under Boston's gray, overcast skies and has a gloomy forecast for Galvin in his quest for redemption and reward for a man who has been defeated by life but makes one last attempt to get off the deck and regain his self-respect and stature in his profession.

3-0 out of 5 stars the film lets down the star
THE VERDICT is one of Paul Newman's most celebrated performances. He plays a down-at-the-heels lawyer named Frank Galvin who lucks his way into a big case involving two doctors who have been horribly negligent, sending a young woman into a coma.
Newman wonderfully gets at Galvin's desperation, and how he fights through an alcoholic haze. It's a thoughtfully worked out performance centered around Newman's wonderfully expressive eyes. Sadly, the rest of THE VERDICT could be taught in a Courtroom Movie Cliche 101 class. The lone lawyer vs the big firm (led by James Mason), altered documents, surprise witnesses, shenanigans by the hospital, it's all here. Even though I enjoyed the acting and the Boston atmosphere, I saw a lot of the plot coming.
The cast includes Jack Warden as Newman's only friend, Joe Seneca, Lindsay Crouse, Wesley Addy, and a chilly Charlotte Rampling as a mysterious woman who crosses Newman's path. The commentary by director Sidney Lumet is of the "everybody was great/this is where we shot" variety.

5-0 out of 5 stars A Monumental Cinematic Treasure
THE VERDICT may date back to 1982, but few courtroom films since then can come close to matching the powerful production in this near perfect film written by David Mamet and directed with tension, grit, and tenderness by Sidney Lumet. Paul Newman's performance as the alcoholic has-been lawyer called upon to try a case of medical malpractice is one of the finest acting performances in history. He is more than ably abetted by his sidekick Jack Warden. The lawyer for the defense is the haughty and evil James Mason and the real surprise in the cast is Milo O'Shea in a terrifyingly real role of a smarmy Judge. Charlotte Rampling, still one of today's finest actresses, plays the understated love interest. Minor roles become major when they are in the hands of such gifted actors as Lindsay Crouse and Julia Bravasso. But one unsung hero of this fine film is the cinematographer who manages to make every shot appear like a Renaissance painting, so sensitive is he to light and shadow and frame composition.

THE VERDICT is a powerful story of the underdog's struggle for truth in the judicial system and as such is a reminder of how the Law, when stripped to its essentials, is there to protect us. There is no pat ending, only a feeling of breathlessness as all of the details of the story are left to our imagination - well, almost. A strikingly powerful, meaningful, brilliantly executed film. ... Read more


18. The Matchmaker
Director: Mark Joffe
list price: $14.98
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: B00007ELJY
Catlog: Video
Sales Rank: 17343
Average Customer Review: 4.25 out of 5 stars
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Reviews (4)

4-0 out of 5 stars Can't Help Falling in Love with the Story
This was a great movie. The ending was totally predictable, especially after you see Sean standing on the car door watching Marcy's plane fly overhead. You just know he's going to come to Boston after her. And Nick sure had it coming throughout the entire movie. It was a beautiful romantic comedy, one you could watch over and over again, and just keep falling in love with the characters.

5-0 out of 5 stars One of my favorites
When I saw this movie, I totally just fell in love with it. I guess I was already a romantic comedy type girl, but this one really is great. I love the scenery, and the mood of the movie itself. David O'Hara is perfect, and all the other cast members are delightful. You must see this movie.

5-0 out of 5 stars Cute Movie..
In the mood for a romantic light-hearted Irish movie, then the
Matchmaker is your best bet. The scenery is beautiful and the
cast is perfect. Garofalo is at her best. I bring this movie
out often especially on St. Patricks Day....

3-0 out of 5 stars A Pretty Good movie :)
This movie depicts a dedicated political assistant (Janene Garofalo) who goes to Ireland in search of a family, and finds much more.
Garofalo doesn't really break away from her typcasted role, being a jaded, cynical woman who doesn't really have time for love. She is convincing as always, and this movie has many humorous moments. It also has its share of moving moments, and the Irish background is perfect. ... Read more


19. The Angel Levine
Director: Ján Kadár
list price: $14.95
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 0792846370
Catlog: Video
Sales Rank: 53281
Average Customer Review: 4.33 out of 5 stars
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Reviews (3)

5-0 out of 5 stars interesting story line and historical too
I found the movie very interesting. I may be biased toward the film since actually I appear in the last scene of this movie (one of the boys at the study table in the black synagogue that Zero Mostel visits) The late Chief Rabbi W.A. Matthew (my grandfather)has an appearance in the movie leading the study group discussion in the historic landmark Harlem synagogue. Although not in the final edit, during filming it was an interesting scripted discussion.
-David Matthew Dore'

5-0 out of 5 stars Great Movie
I watched this on cable and loved it so much I had to buy it. Very different Kind of Movie. I really enjoyed it so much:-)

3-0 out of 5 stars Promise Unfulfilled
Zero Mostel plays a poor schlemiel by the name of Mishkin, who is visited by a Jewish angel named Levine. Levine is played by Harry Belafonte! This certainly promises some very clever and very amusing moments. Unfortunately, the promise remains unkept. In fact, the film never really gets started. I can remember thinking what a long time it was taking to get going, and then the closing credits started to scroll; it never got going. What is particularly disappointing is that this is a film I wanted very much to like. Alas, we don't always get what we want. ... Read more


20. The Playboys
Director: Gillies MacKinnon
list price: $9.94
our price: $9.94
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 6302497183
Catlog: Video
Sales Rank: 37941
Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars
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Reviews (5)

5-0 out of 5 stars delightful! Aidan & Robin are the picture of joyfull love.
I enjoyed this so much that I bought the video to watch over and over. Unfortunately, I lent it out once too often & did not get it back the last time. I am glad to see it is out on DVD & will order right away.

5-0 out of 5 stars very moving story, with parallels to Othello
This is a wonderful film, with terrific performances, especially from Albert Finney who nearly steals the movie with his portrayal of a on the wagon alcoholic cop who finally loses it when rejected by a young woman he got pregnant and humiliates himself.

4-0 out of 5 stars Irish love story.....
THE PLAYBOYS stars Albert Finney, Aiden Quinn and Robin Wright. I saw the film in the theatre several years ago and have been waiting to buy the DVD. I don't remember the characters names, but the gist of the story is this: Robin Wright plays a young woman living in a small village in Ireland. She is the mother of an adorable out-of-wedlock baby. She will not divulge the identity of the baby's father. Albert Finney plays the village constable. He wants to marry Wright, but she refuses to marry him or to identify her child's father. Many folks in the village feel Wright ought to marry the good cop.

One day, a very small traveling carnival arrives in the village. The carnival is so small all the members of the troupe perform multiple tasks. One of the troupe is played by Aiden Quinn. Quinn has a nifty motorcycle which he spins round and round the village green to impress Wright. Finney disapproves of Quinn's interest in Wright. When the carnival leaves the village, Quinn asks Wright to ride aways with him on his motorbike. Will she, should she? You'll have to watch the film to find out whether she chooses the good cop or the dashing young man, and you will discover the identity of the baby's father by the end of the film.

4-0 out of 5 stars Naive... fresh
I liked this movie a lot. It's just charming, fresh...delightful. I can't wait for the DVD!

4-0 out of 5 stars An Irish "Cannary Row"
Give this one a second chance. First time through, I thought plot was thin and weak. Second time through I picked up on the nuances of personal relationships in a rural Irish village, as intertwined as a Celtic knot. Good acting all around - even the stoic children do their part. When traveling players come to town, secrets are revealed and personalities clash, but in the repressed undercurrents common where small groups must live together. A global story with an Irish accent, told in the days before television homogenized the world. ... Read more


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