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1. The Comancheros
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2. The Alamo: Original Uncut Version
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3. Operation Petticoat
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4. The Alamo
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5. The Alamo
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6. It Happened at the World's Fair
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7. It Happened at the World's Fair
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8. Operation Petticoat
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9. Alamo

1. The Comancheros
Director: Michael Curtiz, John Wayne
list price: $6.98
our price: $6.98
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Asin: 6301798090
Catlog: Video
Sales Rank: 5544
Average Customer Review: 4.15 out of 5 stars
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Amazon.com

Nobody made a fuss about The Comancheros when it came out, yet it has proved to be among the most enduringly entertaining of John Wayne's later Westerns. The Duke, just beginning to crease and thicken toward Rooster Cogburn proportions, plays a veteran Texas Ranger named Jake Cutter. When we first see him (in a tongue-in-cheek delayed entrance), he's catching up with a New Orleans dandy (Stuart Whitman) who killed a judge's son in a duel just after that gentlemanly practice was banned. Monsieur Paul Regret--or "Mon-sooor," as Jake insists on calling him--is not a bad fellow, let alone a badman, and it only follows that, after the requisite number of misunderstandings, he and Jake will join forces to subdue rampaging Indians and the evil white men behind their uprising.

The Comancheros was the last credit for Michael Curtiz, who, ravaged by cancer, ceded much of the direction to Wayne (uncredited) and action specialist Cliff Lyons. With support from Wayne stalwarts James Edward Grant (coscreenplay) and William Clothier (camera), the first of many rousing Elmer Bernstein scores for a Wayne picture, and a big, flavorful cast including Lee Marvin (the once and future Liberty Valance), Nehemiah Persoff, Bruce Cabot, and Guinn "Big Boy" Williams (in his last movie), they made a broad, cheerfully bloodthirsty adventure movie for red-meat-eating audiences of all ages. Even the liberal-pinko Time magazine had to second the salute from leading lady Ina Balin at film's end: "Take care of yourself, Big Jake ... we've sort of gotten used to you." --Richard T. Jameson ... Read more

Reviews (20)

4-0 out of 5 stars Lightweight but entertaining John Wayne western.
John Wayne rules in this big, sprawling western adventure film. The screenplay, co-written by western novelist Clair Huffaker, struggles with the historical accuracy of Texas in the 1840s and the rifles seem a little advanced for 1843, but, nit-picking aside, this is an entertaining film. Texas Ranger Jake Cutter (Wayne) and sometime gambler Paul Regret (Stuart Whitman) go under cover after a vicious army of outlaw raiders known as "Comancheros," led by the diabolical Graile (Nehemiah Persoff). Hard-hitting, large scale action sequences deftly directed by Michael Curtiz, who directd some of Errol Flynn's better adventure films, will please action-adventure fans. The movie includes a comfortable blend of action, suspense, and humor with occasional serious overtones of duty, friendship, and the love of a good woman. Taken within the context of the film that isn't as corny as it might sound. Great outdoor color photography adds to the appeal. A pulse-pounding musical score by Elmer Bernstein matches the excitement. Lee Marvin makes the most of his costarring role as Tully Crow, one of the West's wildest bad men. Watch for the hilarious vignette featuring Edgar Buchanan as a judge of dubious integrity. Ditto the comic relief segment with Guinn "Big Boy" Williams as a seemingly bewildered gunrunner. There is nothing intellectual or artistic to say of this movie, but it's good old fashioned fun. Recommended viewing.

5-0 out of 5 stars Classic, Crowd-Pleasing Duke!
You can see by the title that I am a John Wayne fan, and this rip-roaring Western is one of the reasons why. With equal portions of rousing action, humor, and drama, this film keeps your interest and, like the Duke's performance, never loses its authenticity. It's said that John Wayne took over direction of some of the action sequences, and they're great. There are well-drawn, clear differences between the good buys and bad guys, but the characters are human and developed enough for the actors to sink their teeth into, which all do with gusto. By this time in his career, the Duke only had to show up on screen to be the authentic Western hero, but as usual he goes 'way beyond that, giving a colorful, humorous, absolutely real and terrific performance as the Texas Ranger who helps a man on the wrong side of the law redeem himself and find the woman he loves--as well as stopping a motley, dangerous bunch of white renegades (Comancheros) who are selling weapons to warring Comanche Indians. It's great movie-making and a great couple of hours with the Duke, so check it out!

1-0 out of 5 stars Drunk Indians
This movie was good for the most part but then again if you dont want to see drunk indians shoot white people then dont worry about seeing it. There were some good parts in this movie but the whole movie was a rather large dissapointment. These Indains would kill people so they could get their Jollies off byy getting alcohol. This movie was very unrealistic(...). I take my reviews very serioulsly. John Wayne was a good actor props to my man Wayne, he's my man.

5-0 out of 5 stars A Real Entertaining John Wayne Western
THE COMANCHEROS is one of John Wayne's most entertaining Westerns. It has a great cast, story, photography and one of Elmer Bernstein's best scores. The widescreen DVD looks incredible. John Wayne and Stuart Whitman play off each other brilliantly. Lee Marvin as Crow has a small but effective and outrageous character part. There's plenty of action and heroics to go around in this great outdoor adventure. I wish they would make movies like this today.

4-0 out of 5 stars Excellent Duke western
The Comancheros is another great John Wayne western with a great supporting cast. The story follows Captain Jake Cutter, a Texas ranger, and his efforts to capture a prisoner, and then to infiltrate a group of gunrunners and bandits, the Comancheros. This group has been supplying the Comanches with repeating rifles who then wreak havoc on the area. There is plenty of action here with numerous shootouts, and also plenty of great characters. At parts during this movie, I wondered why the Duke never took more comedic roles since he is very funny in several scenes.

John Wayne plays Captain Jake Cutter, the big, brawling Texas Ranger who attempts to bring in a prisoner who keeps escaping his grasp, "Monsoor" Paul Regret, played by Stuart Whitman very well. Another notable performance is Lee Marvin's Crow, the contact between Cutter and the Comancheros. He doesn't have a very big part, but what is there is very good. The film also stars Ina Balin, Nehemiah Persoff, Michael Ansara, Patrick Wayne, Bruce Cabot, and Joan O'Brien. Elmer Bernstein also turns in another excellent score that has elements of the Sons of Katie Elder and The Great Escape. The DVD offers a widescreen presentation which looks very good, two trailers(one in Spanish), and also Movie Tone News about an award presented involving the movie. More John Wayne movies should be put out like this, and I give credit to the companies putting out so many new ones recently. A very exciting, enjoyable Duke western that all his fans will love! ... Read more


2. The Alamo: Original Uncut Version (1960)
Director: John Wayne
list price: $24.98
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 6303599052
Catlog: Video
Sales Rank: 5015
Average Customer Review: 3.84 out of 5 stars
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Amazon.com

John Wayne drew on what he learned from John Ford, Howard Hawks, and practically everyone who directed him during his long career when he made his own directorial debut on this labor of love. The Alamo is a sprawling, unabashedly patriotic epic of the sacrifice made by 187 men defending the Alamo from Santa Ana's bigger and better equipped army. Wayne stars as Col. Davy Crockett, the straight-talking, fun-loving frontiersman turned senator, with Laurence Harvey as the stiff, by-the-book Col. William Travis and Ricahrd Widmark as the legendary Jim Bowie who bristles under Travis's military protocol. The mix of regular army soldiers, Texican irregulars, scouts, and civilians makes for a volatile melting pot, but they all come together in a time of crisis in this metaphor for Wayne's heroic vision of America. Wayne spared no expense in this, one the last of the old fashion Westerns, re-creating the Alamo in exacting detail and corralling a cast of Western icons and old friends, including Richard Boone, Chill Wills (who earned an Oscar nomination), Hank Worden, Denver Pyle, Ken Curtis, and Olive Carey, in addition to teen heartthrob Frankie Avalon and Wayne's son Pat. Even old pal and spiritual godfather John Ford lent a hand shooting second-unit footage. Wayne is no Ford, but despite himself (and a talky script), he delivers an entertaining film full of intriguing characters and excellent action scenes, earning the film an Oscar nomination for Best Picture in 1960. Remember the Alamo! --Sean Axmaker ... Read more

Reviews (90)

5-0 out of 5 stars A Duke Classic
The Alamo is a true western/historical classic that John Wayne wanted to make for years before the actual release. The movie tells the story of the days leading up to and during the famous siege of the Alamo. Many people say it isn't accurate or its boring, but it is really anything but. The movie is full of patriotic speeches that at times slow it down, but they are still very enjoyable. As for historical accuracy, The Alamo goes on its own way. Many things seen in the movie never actually happened, but it contributes to the overall feeling of the picture.

All the performances are truly great. John Wayne portrays Davy Crockett with Richard Widmark as James Bowie and Laurence Harvey as William Travis. The cast is full of Wayne regulars who also give great performances; Chill Wills, Patrick Wayne, Ken Curtis, Denver Pyle, Hank Worden, Chuck Robertson and many others. Other good parts include Joan O'Brien as Susannah Dickinson and Linda Cristal as Flaca, the woman who captures Crockett's heart. The only out of place actor is Frankie Avalon as Smitty, the youngest of the defenders of the Alamo.

Overall, The Alamo is one of my all-time favorite movies. The set built in Bracketville is truly amazing. The final assault on the old mission is one of the best battle scenes ever made. The original, un-cut VHS version is much better than the DVD since it adds almost 30 minutes to the movie that are missing elsewhere. There are several scenes that are very interesting that I don't think should have been cut. However, the DVD does have an interesting documentary about the making of The Alamo. Excellent score by Dmitri Tiomkin, excellent performances, great battle scenes. Do not miss this movie!

5-0 out of 5 stars one of the best movies ever made on the Alamo
as far as historical reference, it's not a documentary, but this movie is awsome. i've been watching The Alamo since i was a little kid. i pratically have the entire movie memorized in my head. the music is great in film, the guitars and mexican sounding music is relaxing. my favorite part as music goes is when the Mexicans are surrounding the Alamo and all you hear is the drums for like 5 minutes. Sounds awsome.

as far as the movie goes, this was a huge production and the Alamo still stands today! The real Alamo of course is in San Antonio, but the Alamo for this movie stands in Bracketville, TX, where other movies have been made. John Wayne stars, produces, and directs this one of a kind film. truly a great film by a great man.

of course, in every Wayne movie, there is always a love story of some sort, and the Alamo has a short love story. The Alamo centers around 185 Texans and fellow men fighting for their independence from Mexico and General Santa Anna, ruler of Mexico. the movie stars Richard Widmark (Jim Bowie) and Laurence Harvey from The Manchurian Candidate as Colonel William Barrett Travis. great movie and great cast. the actual battle scene rocks. tons of explosions and action.

there are 2 sad parts in the movie.
the first sad part is the day before the battle. all the men are together talking about life, because they know tommrrow they are going to die. the background music sets the right tone and i like Davy Crocket's quote during this scene. one of the guys asks him "What ya thinkin Davy?" and John Wayne (Davy Crockett) replies, "Not thinking, just remembering."

the second sad part is after the battle is over, and Lady Dickinson is leaving with her child and the boy. all the Mexican Soliders are standing around, there are some bodies of the men on the ground, and then Santa Anna makes his soliders stand when she's leaving. he also takes off his hat as a sign of respect.

what i liked about this movie is that John Wayne makes both sides look galiant and brave. the men of the Alamo know they are going to die, but they still stay to fight for what they believe in. then he makes the Mexican soilders look honorable twice. the first time, Santa Anna asks that all women and children be evacutated before he attacks, and this takes place.
the second instance is right after the first attack, which happens right after the women and children are released. the Tennessian boys are standing around and one of them says "even though i was killing them, i was proud of them. men dying for what they believe in."

the DVD features include about a 40 mintue feature on the making of the Alamo. this is where you really get to see how much The Alamo ment to John Wayne and just how loyal of a man he really was.

The Alamo is a classic that everybody should watch at least one time in their life. great film that to me, will always be remembered as John Wayne's greatest work.

5-0 out of 5 stars Still Waiting For the 2-Disc Special Edition
One could easily say that seeing this film for the first time was a turning point in my life (it probably had a great impact on a lot of other 6-year old boys, too). To this day, John Wayne's "The Alamo" still has a firm grip on me emotionally.

True, the film is not accurate to history, but I dare anyone to name a movie that is! As I stated in my review of "The Messenger: The Story of Joan of Arc", Hollywood makes "movies", not documentaries (and most documentaries don't agree on the details of the Alamo, anyway). Movie producers, like John Wayne, try to make an "entertainment", to sell tickets and make money. Anyone who thinks film makers are honor-bound to tell the truth on the screen is kidding him or herself.

So the question is: Does this movie entertain? Speaking subjectively, I say a resounding "Yes!". I guess there's still a lot of 6-year old in me.

One suggestion I have for Ted Turner (or whoever makes the DVD decisions over at MGM) is to release the roadshow Director's Cut version on a 2-Disc Special Edition. Include the 40-minute documentary found on the current disc, and any other archival footage pertaining to the film (Oscars, premiere, interviews). I would also like to see the television special, "Spirit of the Alamo", that John Wayne hosted in 1960. A part of it was used in the aforementioned documentary, but it would be nice to see the program complete for a change. Perhaps the discs could also include a printed history of the Alamo and other events during the Texas Revolution, so viewers won't come away from the film thinking they just witnessed the truth.

2-0 out of 5 stars A few good scenes, mostly nonsense
The script of this movie is awful. There are so many historical inaccuracies. There's also a lot of schlock in the movie.

Frankie Avalon didn't disgrace himself, but why was he in the movie, anyway? Smells like pandering to the younger generation!

I couldn't believe The Duke as Davy Crockett. I always thought of him as Duke, rather than Crockett. You can't superimpose one big legend on top of another.

Richards Widmark and Boone were good in their performances.

Laurence Harvey as Travis was terrible! That accent was all over the place. Finally, in his last big speech he abandoned it altogether, sounding more like Laurence Olivier.

This movie was long and bloated. I kept checking my watch. I'm thankful that I don't have to sit through the director's cut!

Skip the first two-thirds of the movie and check out the last third, and you'll be just as well off!

5-0 out of 5 stars Frankie Avalon in one of his 1st movie roles
The movie is good and with Frankie Avalon in one of his 1st movie roles. ... Read more


3. Operation Petticoat
Director: Blake Edwards
list price: $14.98
our price: $14.98
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 0782006787
Catlog: Video
Sales Rank: 5729
Average Customer Review: 4.48 out of 5 stars
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Amazon.com

This lightweight World War II comedy is an amiable wade through the South Pacific buoyed largely by Cary Grant's effortless leadership as the commander of a crippled submarine and by Tony Curtis's blue-eyed wiles as his street-hustler of a supply officer. The crew dodges the enemy in a barely seaworthy vessel held together with chewing gum and baling wire (and, in one instance, a woman's girdle!) and painted a blushing bright pink. The close quarters get even tighter when the sub takes on five young army nurses, a couple of Filipino families, and a goat. Though it has little of the zany knockabout humor that marks later Blake Edwards hits like The Pink Panther and 10 and it almost wears out its premise at two hours, this easy-sailing comedy rolls along the gentle wakes from one fine mess to another with good humor and a bevy of coy close-quarters sex gags. --Sean Axmaker ... Read more

Reviews (33)

5-0 out of 5 stars One of the best
Operation Petticoat is one of those movies that makes you laugh no matter how many times you see it. The cast is led by none other than Cary Grant as the commander of a decrepit submarine, caught behind the Japanese advance in the Pacific, trying hard to sail her back to safety and repair at a US base. Grant makes a fine picture as a tough yet sentimental commanding officer. In counterpoint is Tony Curtis as a totally amoral rascal with a talent for getting things done, usually by breaking all rules. Despite their mutual dislike, the two have to work together to get the sub home and the result is a truly bizarre voyage. Curtis' expertise in scrounging supplies for the damaged sub extends to a group of stranded army nurses, who predictably create havoc on the submarine. And as the sub approaches safety, it improbably ends up as a maternity ward to the consternation of Grant and the delight of the crew. I would hate to spoil the surprises but let me say the manner of the sub reaching safety is simply hilarious. Of course, all ends well - this is a movie after all - and the right lessons are learned by all. A great movie to laugh over with some superb dialog lines for Grant in particular and a string of great one-liners all around. Highly recommended.

5-0 out of 5 stars All Hands will Emergency Surface with Laughter
My favorite part of this hilarious Cary Grant and Tony Curtis romp was when Tony Curtis reports for duty to a WW II submarine in his dress whites. The rest of the crew -- greasy and grimy from trying to get their critically damaged boat into good enough condition to limp to another friendly base laugh their heads off when looking through the periscope they spot Curtis looking a little out of place on the busy pier. However, much to their surprise, Curtis proves himself invaluable as the boats "Supply" officer who does an unequalled job in "procuring" the badly needed parts for the boat in early supply shortened portion of the war in pacific. Come to find out this smoozing, angle hunting "idea man" who had been on the Admiral's staff and "Champion Rumba Dancer" (with the Admiral's wife) really was a street-wise guy from wrong side of the tracks in NY City.

And to top it off the Boat ends up with stranded Army Nurses all this makes for a great movie -- how the submarine ends up pink and how they torpedo an enemy truck I will leave to you find out. Do yourself a favor and get this movie. What a hoot!-- K.K. Dunn (Submarine Veteran), Kansas City

5-0 out of 5 stars A must in Cary Grant Fans
This is a great comedy and a must for Grant Fans. Cary Grant as the commander of a very peculiar submarine sailing thru the Pacific with an even more peculiar crew. Great Movie

3-0 out of 5 stars The Cast
Tony Curtis and Cary Grant are at their handsomest. You should see Cary in his admiral outfit. But, in my opinion, you may disagree, a very obvious flaw is the weak cast of women. I was casting it in my mind as I watched. Marilyn Monroe would have been hilarious-- and Thelma Ritter as the mechanic. Of course, with a stellar cast, the parts would have had to be better for them. The pink sub is hilarious and the men seem very relaxed, glad to get non-challenging roles. This is a must for the 50's comedies collector and has that great super-bright photography.

3-0 out of 5 stars lightweight WWII comedy still worth catching
Like submarines, this flick really doesn't have that much keeping itself above the waterline. The USS Sea Tiger is almost completely destroyed when attacked by the Japanese in port in 1941. Through the pluck of its commanding officer, Matt Sherman (Cary Grant) and the scheming of his very un-military XO (Tony Curtis), the stricken sub is pulled together enough to make it out to sea, where it suffers a series of embarrassing misadventures - the crowning indignity being the coat of pink paint it must wear when their isn't enough gray. In between, the sub faces off against a squad of army nurses, a family of Filipino refugees, a goat, and a torpedoed jeep - all without killing a fly. It's not great comedy, but the flick gets by with Curtis as Holden who can always get what he wants, and never wants active-duty (when he tells Grant that he had seen action on a destroyer, Grant is dumbstruck that Curtis ever found time for it between golfing with admirals and dancing at the Royal Hawaiian Hotel). The flick actually belongs to Grant as the prim and perfect Sherman who tries to mold Curtis into a proper officer and finds himself being molded in his likeness instead. (When sailors find their port facilities stripped to provide replacement parts for Sea Tiger, a forlorn admiral concludes that they've witnessed "Sherman's march to the sea".) The leads aside, "Petticoat" is actually a great time capsule of a time in Hollywood when the military was still respected - in more modern flicks, the street smarts of Curtis's character would make him the hero and the wisest of all. But the script makes him a pathetic weasel to be whipped into shape by the proper Sherman, who of course sees right through Holden. ... Read more


4. The Alamo
Director: John Wayne
list price: $9.94
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: B00004WIBE
Catlog: Video
Sales Rank: 4973
Average Customer Review: 3.84 out of 5 stars
US | Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France | Japan

Reviews (90)

5-0 out of 5 stars A Duke Classic
The Alamo is a true western/historical classic that John Wayne wanted to make for years before the actual release. The movie tells the story of the days leading up to and during the famous siege of the Alamo. Many people say it isn't accurate or its boring, but it is really anything but. The movie is full of patriotic speeches that at times slow it down, but they are still very enjoyable. As for historical accuracy, The Alamo goes on its own way. Many things seen in the movie never actually happened, but it contributes to the overall feeling of the picture.

All the performances are truly great. John Wayne portrays Davy Crockett with Richard Widmark as James Bowie and Laurence Harvey as William Travis. The cast is full of Wayne regulars who also give great performances; Chill Wills, Patrick Wayne, Ken Curtis, Denver Pyle, Hank Worden, Chuck Robertson and many others. Other good parts include Joan O'Brien as Susannah Dickinson and Linda Cristal as Flaca, the woman who captures Crockett's heart. The only out of place actor is Frankie Avalon as Smitty, the youngest of the defenders of the Alamo.

Overall, The Alamo is one of my all-time favorite movies. The set built in Bracketville is truly amazing. The final assault on the old mission is one of the best battle scenes ever made. The original, un-cut VHS version is much better than the DVD since it adds almost 30 minutes to the movie that are missing elsewhere. There are several scenes that are very interesting that I don't think should have been cut. However, the DVD does have an interesting documentary about the making of The Alamo. Excellent score by Dmitri Tiomkin, excellent performances, great battle scenes. Do not miss this movie!

5-0 out of 5 stars one of the best movies ever made on the Alamo
as far as historical reference, it's not a documentary, but this movie is awsome. i've been watching The Alamo since i was a little kid. i pratically have the entire movie memorized in my head. the music is great in film, the guitars and mexican sounding music is relaxing. my favorite part as music goes is when the Mexicans are surrounding the Alamo and all you hear is the drums for like 5 minutes. Sounds awsome.

as far as the movie goes, this was a huge production and the Alamo still stands today! The real Alamo of course is in San Antonio, but the Alamo for this movie stands in Bracketville, TX, where other movies have been made. John Wayne stars, produces, and directs this one of a kind film. truly a great film by a great man.

of course, in every Wayne movie, there is always a love story of some sort, and the Alamo has a short love story. The Alamo centers around 185 Texans and fellow men fighting for their independence from Mexico and General Santa Anna, ruler of Mexico. the movie stars Richard Widmark (Jim Bowie) and Laurence Harvey from The Manchurian Candidate as Colonel William Barrett Travis. great movie and great cast. the actual battle scene rocks. tons of explosions and action.

there are 2 sad parts in the movie.
the first sad part is the day before the battle. all the men are together talking about life, because they know tommrrow they are going to die. the background music sets the right tone and i like Davy Crocket's quote during this scene. one of the guys asks him "What ya thinkin Davy?" and John Wayne (Davy Crockett) replies, "Not thinking, just remembering."

the second sad part is after the battle is over, and Lady Dickinson is leaving with her child and the boy. all the Mexican Soliders are standing around, there are some bodies of the men on the ground, and then Santa Anna makes his soliders stand when she's leaving. he also takes off his hat as a sign of respect.

what i liked about this movie is that John Wayne makes both sides look galiant and brave. the men of the Alamo know they are going to die, but they still stay to fight for what they believe in. then he makes the Mexican soilders look honorable twice. the first time, Santa Anna asks that all women and children be evacutated before he attacks, and this takes place.
the second instance is right after the first attack, which happens right after the women and children are released. the Tennessian boys are standing around and one of them says "even though i was killing them, i was proud of them. men dying for what they believe in."

the DVD features include about a 40 mintue feature on the making of the Alamo. this is where you really get to see how much The Alamo ment to John Wayne and just how loyal of a man he really was.

The Alamo is a classic that everybody should watch at least one time in their life. great film that to me, will always be remembered as John Wayne's greatest work.

5-0 out of 5 stars Still Waiting For the 2-Disc Special Edition
One could easily say that seeing this film for the first time was a turning point in my life (it probably had a great impact on a lot of other 6-year old boys, too). To this day, John Wayne's "The Alamo" still has a firm grip on me emotionally.

True, the film is not accurate to history, but I dare anyone to name a movie that is! As I stated in my review of "The Messenger: The Story of Joan of Arc", Hollywood makes "movies", not documentaries (and most documentaries don't agree on the details of the Alamo, anyway). Movie producers, like John Wayne, try to make an "entertainment", to sell tickets and make money. Anyone who thinks film makers are honor-bound to tell the truth on the screen is kidding him or herself.

So the question is: Does this movie entertain? Speaking subjectively, I say a resounding "Yes!". I guess there's still a lot of 6-year old in me.

One suggestion I have for Ted Turner (or whoever makes the DVD decisions over at MGM) is to release the roadshow Director's Cut version on a 2-Disc Special Edition. Include the 40-minute documentary found on the current disc, and any other archival footage pertaining to the film (Oscars, premiere, interviews). I would also like to see the television special, "Spirit of the Alamo", that John Wayne hosted in 1960. A part of it was used in the aforementioned documentary, but it would be nice to see the program complete for a change. Perhaps the discs could also include a printed history of the Alamo and other events during the Texas Revolution, so viewers won't come away from the film thinking they just witnessed the truth.

2-0 out of 5 stars A few good scenes, mostly nonsense
The script of this movie is awful. There are so many historical inaccuracies. There's also a lot of schlock in the movie.

Frankie Avalon didn't disgrace himself, but why was he in the movie, anyway? Smells like pandering to the younger generation!

I couldn't believe The Duke as Davy Crockett. I always thought of him as Duke, rather than Crockett. You can't superimpose one big legend on top of another.

Richards Widmark and Boone were good in their performances.

Laurence Harvey as Travis was terrible! That accent was all over the place. Finally, in his last big speech he abandoned it altogether, sounding more like Laurence Olivier.

This movie was long and bloated. I kept checking my watch. I'm thankful that I don't have to sit through the director's cut!

Skip the first two-thirds of the movie and check out the last third, and you'll be just as well off!

5-0 out of 5 stars Frankie Avalon in one of his 1st movie roles
The movie is good and with Frankie Avalon in one of his 1st movie roles. ... Read more


5. The Alamo
Director: John Wayne
list price: $29.98
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 6302453232
Catlog: Video
Sales Rank: 13877
Average Customer Review: 4.43 out of 5 stars
US | Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France | Japan

Reviews (7)

4-0 out of 5 stars excellent battle scenes.......wrong story & details
Although I've seen The Alamo many times and love it as a true war classic, it tells a fictional account of the battle. For instance, Col.Travis, played by Lawrnce Harvey, is too flamebryot in his character....The real Col.Travis wasn't like that. Second, the palisade wall between the Alamo church and the Lower Barracks is only built about 4 to 5 ft. high....the real palisade wall was about 10 to 12 ft. Third, when Bonham returns to the Alamo, he brings news that Fannin isn't coming because he was ambushed by part of Santa Anna's army....in the real story, Fannin is in Goliad and he said he couldn't come relive the Alamo because his wagons and other equipment broke down and he couldn't move, so he goes back to Goliad and decides to hold up there as long as he could. Fourth, when Travis tells the men that no help is coming, he simply tells them if they want to go out and maybe join up with Houston's small army, they can....in the real thing, he tells them what's really happening and he takes his sword and draws a line in the dirt and asks whoever wants to join him in the fight for freedom, come over to him. Fifth, in the real story, there was a big cannon known as the 18 pounder that was put at the south-west corner of the fort and it was the cannon that fired the thunderous 'No' at Santa Ann's request for surrender....in the movie, the 18 pounder wasn't seen at all. And finally, Jim Bowie's character, played by Richard Widemark, is okay, but in the real thing, Bowie was 6.ft 6.in tall and in the movie, Bowie looks like he's 6ft. 2in tall...........Despite these inaccuracies, this movie is great because of it's large battles scenes, which were really good. I loved the part where James Bowie fights to the end and takes a bunch of Mexicans with him, and I realy liked that 7-barreled shotgun that Bowie used in the end. All-in-all, this movie is a good one if you like a good western. I recemend it.

5-0 out of 5 stars This is the One to Get!
THE ALAMO is one of my top 10 favorite movies of all time. THE ALAMO is one of our nation's greatest cinematic icons of "Film Americana" ever made. Through word, song and picture the legend of the Alamo was handed down and stills lives today. Men and women of different religious, ethnic and social backgrounds came together and died or lost loved ones at the Alamo in a noble effort to overcome tyranny and preserve basic human freedoms. John Wayne preserved that legend on film. John Wayne produced, directed and starred in this epic mixing nobility with bawdiness resulting in a reverence for the ideals of the defenders seen through their personal lives and conduct. The cast, script, production design and score added to the richly textured look and feel to the film. John Wayne is effective in his portrayal of Col. David Crockett. However, John Wayne takes a back seat to the brilliant performances of Laurence Harvey as Col. William Travis and Richard Widmark as Col. James Bowie as they feud and bicker over the virtues of military protocol vs. and expedience. Wayne in turn approaches the role of Crockett as the levelheaded onlooker who interjects this legend with passages of homespun witticism to keep the defenders from losing focus of their reason for being there. The entire cast is very good. You get the feeling that the actors gave a little more of themselves to deliver this story. Ken Curtis as Capt. Dickinson, Chill Wills as Beekeeper, Richard Boone as General Sam Houston, Joan O'Brien as Mrs. Dickinson, Patrick Wayne as Capt. James Butler Bonham, Hank Worden as Parson, Denver Pyle as Gambler, Linda Cristal as Flaca, Ruben Padilla as General Santa Anna and Frankie Avalon as Smitty all deliver staunch or heartfelt performances. Cinematographer William Clothier's images are proud and majestic depicting the honor of the defenders. James Edward Grant's script is intelligent, energetic and moving. Equally energetic and moving is the eloquent and multi-textured score by Dimitri Tiomkin. Tiomkin's scoring of the final battle scene is brilliant and highly overlooked. Tiomkin integrates the nobility of the combatants with the fervor of the conflict and with simple queues he emotionally captures the falling of each defender in a brief moment of reflection as the battle rages on. His song "The Green Leaves of Summer" is beautiful, reflective and haunting and is effectively integrated into the context of why the defenders gave their lives. This director's cut version is incredible as it gives us further insight into the motivations of the defenders. This uncut version vastly explores many of the characters and their interwoven relationships especially between Laurence Harvey's Colonel William Travis and Ken Curtis' Captain Dickinson. This uncut version demonstrates definitively that THE ALAMO is one of America's greatest films and a vision come true thanks to John Wayne's determination and insight to what drives the American spirit.

4-0 out of 5 stars pure enjoyment.
I only recently saw the full version of the Alamo.I must say it was excellent.Great stuff.As a non American I am jealous of your heroes.Only flaw was the historical in accuracies.Why not tell it as it happened?Other than that,Mr.Wayne did a superb job.

3-0 out of 5 stars Boring story - rousing finale!
Final battle-scenes are second to none, but somebody should have wrote a storyline for Wayne to direct for the first two hours. With potential and fine production values, this movie could and should have been much better. Three stars are for final battle-scenes and a few good scenes in between. Wayne and Widmark are OK and so is Laurence Harvey -but why on earth did they have real "brit" playing col. William Travis?

5-0 out of 5 stars "The Alamo" with John Wayne, Richard Widmark, Richard Boone
Despite What the normal critics said about the film being below standard and losing money, it did not lose money in the average since. It far out- did Wayne's later performance in "True Grit" and should've won an oscar for both Wayne AND Widmark. ... Read more


6. It Happened at the World's Fair
Director: Norman Taurog
list price: $14.95
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: B00008FEC3
Catlog: Video
Sales Rank: 47893
Average Customer Review: 4.59 out of 5 stars
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Reviews (27)

5-0 out of 5 stars Elvis is an A+ and worth all 5 stars
After viewing this movie and a co-feature called "Girls! Girls! Girls!" in a double-feature recently, I am convinced that Elvis Presley was the greatest film actor of all time. I may only be 12, but I know a great movie star when I see one. Together, these two movies provided an extraordinary evening for me, especially when they were shown together on the same billing. I really enjoyed the songs; especially "One Broken Heart For Sale", and "Return To Sender". Thank you, Elvis!

5-0 out of 5 stars I love the old movies of the Space Needle
I would love to watch old movies of Elvis Presley and joan O'Brien who were in love and beautiful songs at the Space Needle's revolving restaurant.The old movie was made in Seattle World's Fair 1962 and the Space Needle when it was paint orange, red and yellow. The original paint was very short time from 1962 to 1968. I have Private collection of many original old color slides of the Space Needle when it was paint orange, red and yellow in 1962 Seattle World's Fair. I want let me know when the new DVD movie coming soon.

5-0 out of 5 stars ONE OF HIS BEST!
WB did a GREAT job on the cover! The film looks GREAT re-mastered and letter-boxed! One I was waiting for on DVD! EXCELLENT Soundtrack too!

5-0 out of 5 stars g.i.blues
It's the d.v.d's of all of them this is my favorite elvis movie of all why ???? you ask in this film this is where he sings the most.I own 13 of his movies I want to own them all I loved elvis since I was a kid and I'll always be in his debt for creating music in his image he may not be a good actor but when he sings he still can put tears in my eyes long live the king.........

2-0 out of 5 stars A VHS re-release would have been nice too!!
No complaints with the movie itself. The 2-star rating is for not making a VHS release also. We have all the other Elvis movies on VHS (except for Girls-Girls Girls). A VHS release for those Elvis fans who do not have a dvd player in their near future would have been nice. ... Read more


7. It Happened at the World's Fair
Director: Norman Taurog
list price: $14.95
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 6301969529
Catlog: Video
Sales Rank: 21475
Average Customer Review: 4.59 out of 5 stars
US | Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France | Japan

Reviews (27)

5-0 out of 5 stars Elvis is an A+ and worth all 5 stars
After viewing this movie and a co-feature called "Girls! Girls! Girls!" in a double-feature recently, I am convinced that Elvis Presley was the greatest film actor of all time. I may only be 12, but I know a great movie star when I see one. Together, these two movies provided an extraordinary evening for me, especially when they were shown together on the same billing. I really enjoyed the songs; especially "One Broken Heart For Sale", and "Return To Sender". Thank you, Elvis!

5-0 out of 5 stars I love the old movies of the Space Needle
I would love to watch old movies of Elvis Presley and joan O'Brien who were in love and beautiful songs at the Space Needle's revolving restaurant.The old movie was made in Seattle World's Fair 1962 and the Space Needle when it was paint orange, red and yellow. The original paint was very short time from 1962 to 1968. I have Private collection of many original old color slides of the Space Needle when it was paint orange, red and yellow in 1962 Seattle World's Fair. I want let me know when the new DVD movie coming soon.

5-0 out of 5 stars ONE OF HIS BEST!
WB did a GREAT job on the cover! The film looks GREAT re-mastered and letter-boxed! One I was waiting for on DVD! EXCELLENT Soundtrack too!

5-0 out of 5 stars g.i.blues
It's the d.v.d's of all of them this is my favorite elvis movie of all why ???? you ask in this film this is where he sings the most.I own 13 of his movies I want to own them all I loved elvis since I was a kid and I'll always be in his debt for creating music in his image he may not be a good actor but when he sings he still can put tears in my eyes long live the king.........

2-0 out of 5 stars A VHS re-release would have been nice too!!
No complaints with the movie itself. The 2-star rating is for not making a VHS release also. We have all the other Elvis movies on VHS (except for Girls-Girls Girls). A VHS release for those Elvis fans who do not have a dvd player in their near future would have been nice. ... Read more


8. Operation Petticoat
Director: Blake Edwards
list price: $14.98
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 6302990076
Catlog: Video
Sales Rank: 35704
Average Customer Review: 3.21 out of 5 stars
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Reviews (14)

4-0 out of 5 stars Where did the Construction Batallion (SeaBees) come from?
This movie provides one telling of their story. During WWII, there was a serious need for men in the military who had the know how and the determination to carry out essential construction work, particularly in the Pacific Theatre of operations.

In this movie we learn a bit about the plan and recruitment of men to serve as hybrid construction workers/soldiers. John Wayne was a natural choice to serve as the prototypical SeaBee -- an undisciplined individual, but determined, willing and able.

Join JW and his colleagues as they work and fight their way across the Pacific, building runways and roads, and anything else that needed to be made. During their spare time, they did some fighting, and JW finds time for some romancing (doesn't he usually?).

A good telling, and an interesting movie, but not quite 5-star material. Well worth a watch though!

4-0 out of 5 stars Navy Heritage - US Navy Seabees
This movie has become a part of lore among the men and women of the finest combat contstruction organizations of the US military. It is a nice Hollywood adaptation of the creation of the US Navy Seabees. And who can forget the best character in the movie -- Natasha! It's not often that you see JW's character make the ultimate sacrifice. I watch this and see the beginning of some traditions and attitudes still in practice today. "With Compassion for Others, We Build - We Fight, for Peace with Freedom," from the Seabee Museum. Remember their montra: Seabee Can-Do.

3-0 out of 5 stars Unintentionally comical
The few brief glimpses of William Frawley in boot camp are reason enough to make this movie worthy of viewing. A rather vanilla production, satisfactory if you're not going in with high expectations.

3-0 out of 5 stars Susan and the Duke.
This is probably only a 2 star movie, but I rounded up because susan Hayward was my fav actress of that era, and JW was my fav actor period.

3-0 out of 5 stars Fair DVD
I was disappointed with the quality of the DVD. The movie was not restored, it was copied from a fair print. I liked the movie. ... Read more


9. Alamo
Director: John Wayne
list price: $24.98
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 6305135134
Catlog: Video
Sales Rank: 65370
Average Customer Review: 5 out of 5 stars
US | Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France | Japan

Reviews (2)

5-0 out of 5 stars What???
You have got to be kiding me? Only 2 reviews for this wonderful movie? John Wayne kicks it in this movie set during the Texas War for Independence. The action is wonderful(though there is a famous Hollywood bluder during one the battle sceans.) The acting for the most part is also outstand

Overall-An all around good movie.

5-0 out of 5 stars One of the Best Films ever produced
John Wayne's THE ALAMO is one of my top 10 favorite movies of all time. THE ALAMO is one of our nation's greatest icons of film Americana. Through word, song and picture the legend of the Alamo was handed down and stills lives today. Men and women of different religious, ethnic and social backgrounds came together and died or lost loved ones at the Alamo in a noble effort to overcome tyranny and preserve basic human freedoms. John Wayne preserved that legend on film. John Wayne produced, directed and starred in this epic mixing nobility with bawdiness resulting in a reverence for the ideals of the defenders seen through their personal lives and conduct. The cast, script, production design and score added to the richly textured look and feel to the film. John Wayne is effective in his portrayal of Col. David Crockett. However, John Wayne takes a back seat to the brilliant performances of Laurence Harvey as Col. William Travis and Richard Widmark as Col. James Bowie as they feud and bicker over the virtues of military protocol vs. and expedience. Wayne in turn approaches the role of Crockett as the levelheaded onlooker who interjects with passages of homespun witticism to keep the defenders from losing focus of their reason for being there. The entire cast is very good. You get the feeling that the actors gave a little more of themselves to deliver this story. Ken Curtis as Capt. Dickinson, Chill Wills as Beekeeper, Richard Boone as General Sam Houston, Joan O'Brien as Mrs. Dickinson, Patrick Wayne as Capt. James Butler Bonham, Hank Worden as Parson, Denver Pyle as Gambler, Linda Cristal as Flaca, Ruben Padilla as General Santa Anna and Frankie Avalon as Smitty all deliver staunch or heartfelt performances. Cinematographer William Clothier's images are proud and majestic depicting the honor of the defenders. James Edward Grant's script is intelligent, energetic and moving. Equally energetic and moving is the eloquent and multi-textured score by Dimitri Tiomkin. Tiomkin's scoring of the final battle scene is brilliant and highly overlooked. Tiomkin integrates the nobility of the combatants with the fervor of the conflict and with simple queues he emotionally captures the falling of each defender in a brief moment of reflection as the battle rages on. His song "The Green Leaves of Summer" is beautiful, reflective and haunting and is effectively integrated into the context of why the defenders gave their lives. THE ALAMO is one of America's greatest films. ... Read more


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